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Case Studies (124)

IoT Developer Trends 2017 Edition

Guest post by Ian Skerrett

For the last 3 years we have been tracking the trends of the IoT developer community through the IoT Developer Survey [2015] [2016]. Today, we released the third edition of the IoT Developer Survey 2017. As in previous years, the report provides some interesting insights into what IoT developers are thinking and using to build IoT solutions. Below are some of the key trends we identified in the results.

The survey is the results of a collaboration between the Eclipse IoT Working GroupIEEEAgile-IoT EU and the IoT Council. Each partner promoted the survey to their respective communities. A total of 713 individuals participated in the survey. The complete report is available for everyone and we also make available the detailed data [xlsodf].

As with any survey of this type, I always caution people to see these results as one data point that should be compared to other industry reports. All of these surveys have inherent biases so identifying trends that span surveys is important.

Key Trends from 2017 Survey

 1. Expanding Industry Adoption of IoT

The 2017 survey participants appear to be involved in a more diverse set of industries. IoT Platform and Home Automation industries continue to lead but industries such as Industrial Automation, Smart Cities, Energy Management experience significant growth between 2016 to 2017.

industries

2. Security is the key concern but….

Security continues to be the main concern IoT developers with 46.7% respondents indicating it was a concern. Interoperability (24.4%) and Connectivity (21.4%) are the next most popular concerns mentioned. It would appear that Interoperability is on a downward trend for 2015 (30.7%) and 2016 (29.4%) potentially indicating the work on standards and IoT middleware are lessening this concern.

concerns2017

This year we asked what security-related technologies were being used for IoT solutions. The top two security technologies selected were the existing software technologies, ie. Communication Security (TLS, DTLS) (48.3%) and Data Encryption (43.2%). Hardware oriented security solutions were less popular, ex. Trusted Platform Modules (10%) and Hardware Security Modules (10.6%). Even Over the Air Update was only being used by 18.5% of the respondents. Security may be a key concern but it certainly seems like the adoption of security technology is lagging.

security

3. Top IoT Programming Language Depends…

Java and C are the primary IoT programming languages, along with significant usage of C++, Python and JavaScript. New this year we asked in the survey, language usage by IoT categories: Constrained Devices, IoT Gateway and IoT Cloud Platform. Broken down by these categories it is apparent that language usage depends on the target destination for the developed software:

  • On constrained devices, C (56.4%) and C++ (38.3%) and the dominant languages being used. Java (21.2%) and Python (20.8%) have some usage but JavaScript (10.3%) is minimal.
  • On IoT Gateways, the language of choice is more diverse, Java (40.8%), C (30.4%), Python (29.9%) and C++ (28.1%) are all being used. JavaScript and Node.js have some use.
  • On IoT Cloud Platforms, Java (46.3%) emerges as the dominant language. JavaScript (33.6%), Node.js (26.3%) and Python (26.2%) have some usage. Not surprisingly, C (7.3%) and C++ (11.6%) usage drops off significantly.

Overall, it is clear IoT solution development requires a diverse set of language programming skills. The specific language of choice really depends on the target destination.

4. Linux is key OS; Raspbian and Ubuntu top IoT Linux distros

Linux continues to be the main operating system for IoT. This year we asked to identify OS by the categories: Constrained Device and IoT Gateway. On Constrained Devices, Linux (44.1%) is the most popular OS but the second most popular is No OS/ Bar Metal (27.6%). On IoT Gateway, Linux (66.9%) becomes even more popular and Windows (20.5%) becomes the second choice.

The survey also asked which Linux distro is being used. Raspbian (45.5%) and Ubuntu (44.%) are the two top distros for IoT.

linuxdistros

If Linux is the dominant operating system for IoT, how are the alternative IoT operating systems doing? In 2017, Windows definitely experienced a big jump from previous years. It also seems like FreeRTOS and Contiki are experiencing growth in their usage.

 5. Amazon, MS and Google Top IoT Cloud Platforms

Amazon (42.7%) continues to be the leading IoT Cloud Platform followed by MS Azure (26.7%) and Google Cloud Platform (20.4%). A significant change this year has been the drop of Private / On-premise cloud usage, from 34.9% in 2016 to 18.4% in 2017. This might be an indication that IoT Cloud Platforms are now more mature and developers are ready to embrace them.

cloud

6. Bluetooth, LPWAN protocols and 6LowPAN trending up; Thread sees little adoption

For the last 3 years we have asked what connectivity protocols developers use for IoT solutions. The main response has been TCP/IP and Wi-Fi. However, there are a number of connectivity standards and technologies that are being developed for IoT so it has been interesting to track their adoption within the IoT developer community. Based on the 2017 data, it would appear Bluetooth/Bluetooth Smart (48.2%), LPWAN technologies (ex LoRa, Sigfox, LTE-M) (22.4%) and 6LoWPAN (21.4%) are being adopted by the IoT developer community. However, it would appear Thread (6.4%) is still having limited success with developer adoption.

connectivity2017

Summary

Overall, the survey results are showing some common patterns for IoT developers. The report also looks at common IoT hardware architecture, IDE usage, perceptions of IoT Consortiums, adoption of IoT standards, open source participation in IoT and lots more. I hope the report provides useful information source to the wider IoT industry.

Next week we will be doing a webinar to go through the details of the results. Please join us on April 26 at 10:30amET/16:30pmCET.

2017 IoT Survey - webinar 2

Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey, the individual input is what makes these surveys useful. Also, thank you to our co-sponsors Eclipse IoT Working GroupIEEEAgile IoT and the IoT Council. It is great to be able to collaborate with other successful IoT communities.

We will plan to do another survey next year. Feel free to leave any comments or thoughts on how we can improve it.

This post originally appeared here.

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Guest Contribution by Kenie Ho and Forrest Jones, Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP

Everyone at this point, even the most technology averse, has heard of the Internet of Things (IoT) or seen some of its products.  From “learning thermostats” like Nest to “wearable technologies” like the FitBit, the average consumer sees devices moving toward more integration in unexpected places.  And, like the proverbial iceberg, these consumer-facing technologies make up only the tip of a much larger wave of innovation, which is already reshaping how business, the economy, and society operates.  That rising wave is greatest in the Industrial IoT.  

The Tip

At its core, IoT is a simple concept.  It’s about inter-networking not just traditional computing devices, such as personal computers, laptops, or media centers, but also a host of other objects, such as thermostats, coffee makers, cars, lights, security systems, employee badges, watches, and toothbrushes—to name just a few that have been folded into the IoT world. 

The advantage of having each of these devices talking to each other is the same as it was for inter-networking computers: efficiency, communication, and automation.  Say you live in an IoT-connected house and wake up on a cold, snowy morning.  Your smartwatch detects when you wake up through your movement and heartbeat.  It sends a signal for the coffee maker to start and for the thermostat to warm up the house.  Once you’ve enjoyed your coffee, your smart car uses that as a cue to turn on its engine so that you can hop in an already-warmed car and ride to work. 

Before you leave though, the washing machine and dishwasher set themselves to do a load of laundry and dishes. The appliances and water heater talk to each other taking turns cleaning throughout the day, but with maximum efficiency because they know you won’t be home until dark.  With each of these devices connected together, they get the benefit of the information all the other devices collect, and so can do more with minimal additional expense.

The Industrial IoT

The Industrial IoT (IIoT) applies the same concept as the above consumer-facing example, only on a much larger scale and for more specific purposes.  Instead of a coffee maker in your home, the same concept is applied to a fleet of coffee makers in office buildings across a whole city.  Each one reports back to a central server on its inventory, allowing a beverage-supply company to efficiently plan its resupply route.  Or as another example, the component parts in a fleet of construction vehicles each regularly report on their respective wear and tear, allowing the manufacturer to automatically bill and send out replacement parts just before they are needed, saving construction firms time and money in downtime from worn-out equipment. 

IIoT systems tend to focus more on industry needs, with a specific efficiency in mind.  So we see a wide variety of specific, and often purpose-tailored IIoT systems in particular industries.  Compare this with the commercial IoT you see at home.  Home consumers seek integration across a large swath of household objects.  Without knowing precisely what functions they might like over the life of their IoT devices, consumers want to be able to enable whatever future feature they desire without needing to rebuy an entire system.

As IoT technology matures, disparate IIoT systems are merging towards each other similar to the consumer IoT world, leading to many potential conflicts.  For example, GE Predix and IBM Bluemix are already in a collision course as each expands into the analytics space of the IIoT, and the permeating presence of the lighting industry seems destined to spark a wave of litigations as each player vies to upgrade the existing lighting solutions to IIoT-compatible LED systems.

Standards-Essential Patents

In the past, industries have recognized the problems that multiple competing systems can cause.  This has been particularly acute in areas like telecommunications, where multiple devices made by different manufacturers must talk to one another.  Telecommunication companies have typically relied on a standard-setting organization (SSO) to set interoperability standards to ensure compatibility.  Standards will be just as important to IIoT because interoperability is its lifeblood.

Companies who help set a standard often have invested great time and money developing the technology on which the standard may rely, including securing intellectual property (IP) rights like patents to protect that investment.  To address this issue, SSOs typically require that SSO members license any patents essential to practice the standard on “fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory” terms (referred to as “FRAND” terms).

Sophisticated companies in each industry sector are keeping an eye on IIoT standard-setting efforts.  While it may be frustrating to be limited to FRAND terms when licensing a patent to a competitor, having competitors adopt your technology and pay you a royalty will promote your profile in the industry.  Further, if you don’t participate in the standard-setting process, a competitor’s technology could end up as the adopted standard, and you’d be the one paying license royalties instead of collecting them.

Large-Scale Litigation May Be Inevitable

While some industries may try to rely on technological standards and FRAND licensing terms to ensure ease of entry into the market, it’s likely that other industries will rely on ecosystem “buy-in” to provide customer loyalty.  Ecosystem buy-in is a species of “prospective cost” logic.

If a company has already outfitted its shipping fleet with trucks that use GPS locaters from System Y, then it makes more sense to buy the fuel monitors or load-reporting systems of System Y as well.  Consequently, multiple “System Y" compatible devices will be used across the fleet, making it inefficient to switch to another system.  At that point, the company has bought into the System Y ecosystem of products and won’t want to pay “prospective costs” to switch.

These ecosystem efficiencies will, over time, create a handful of large, powerful default standards, which will perform analogous functions but will have separate competing families of products.  If this sounds familiar, then it should.  This same storm of factors was partially the reason for the explosion in litigation between tech giants, Apple and Samsung, in the on-going smart-phone wars.  In a way, that was the first wave of large-scale IoT patent wars.

An important distinction for firms entering this expanding field, though, is that the smart-phone wars were constrained to mostly just phones.  The technological players were well defined, and each knew who the others were likely to be.  The wars were as much about carving out territory in the market as about placing entry barriers to new, disruptive firms that might challenge existing players.

IIoT seems destined to be much harder to control.  By its nature, it is set up to encourage disruption, as tech companies move into industrial areas they have never touched before, and industrial companies start developing technologies that widely apply beyond their industry.  Amazon’s constantly morphing role in the American tech space, from online goods purveyor to Amazon Web Services provider, is just one example of the power of the IoT.  As these industries are disrupted, it becomes harder, if not impossible, to predict precisely where the next major legal challenge will come.  Therefore, companies have fallen back to the conventional patent practice of developing or acquiring defensive patent portfolios as an essential part of expanding into IIoT.

Conclusion

IIoT is already changing the way industry operates, and this new frontier has pushed its way into the world of intellectual property law.  For pioneers in any field, monitoring and participating in any standards-setting efforts in their industry area becomes critical.  Further, maintaining a comprehensive IP portfolio will be vital to protecting against the waves of litigation to come.  Even with these legal hurdles, though, the IIoT is an area of massive opportunity and growth.

 

Authors’ Bio

Kenie Ho leads the IoT legal group at Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner LLP. He is a thought leader on IP issues for IoT and frequently speaks and publishes on IoT legal topics.  He has litigated well over 60 patents, primarily focusing on electrical, software, and consumer electronics technology.  In addition to enforcing and defending against patent infringement lawsuits, he helps startups and large companies strategically develop their patent portfolios and IP rights.

Forrest Jones is an attorney at Finnegan, focusing his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts and prosecution ofpatent applications. He has technical experience in electrical and computer engineering, including computer software, signal processing, power generation, consumer electronics, and business methods.

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Are You Real? Bringing Authentication to IoT

Serial entrepreneur Chris Ciabarra is at it again. The co-founder and CTO of Revel Systems, an iPad point-of-sale (POS) disruptor which has a valuation of more than $500 million and landed a global contract to replace all of Shell Oil’s PoS terminals with Revel’s, has helped launch Authenticated Reality, an authenticated secure community that fosters real interactions, comments and online conversations from real people on the internet.

Chris is an anti-hacker and data security expert with a strong background in PCI compliance and P2PE. He has presented across the globe as well as in front of the 5th Annual United States Homeland Security Conference on various security topics including how the Internet needs to change.

While his current company is aimed at getting consumers and business to identify themselves as “real,” we couldn’t help but ask him about what his current endeavor might mean for IoT.

What is Authenticated Reality?

Authenticated Reality is a secure community of users and devices. In order to be accepted into the secure community you must authenticate yourself. With all users authenticated this will keep the online community safe from hackers that often hide behind anonymity .  

You talk a lot about this concept of “The New Internet”. What do you mean by it?  

The New Internet is a secure community of users that connect and see each other's real identity while interacting. The biggest problem we face on the internet today stems from a lack of identification. This problem is widespread across multiple verticals when you look at what is wrong with the current internet. For example, IMDB.com recently disabled their movie boards where fans would comment and engage with other movie fanatics. Why would IMDB.com disable something so popular that millions of their users were actively engaging in? Because they felt it was not longer fostering a positive environment for their millions of users. Too much hatred and spamming from online trolls that hide behind a pseudonym and a computer screen. On The New Internet this hatred and spamming would for the most part go away because once you remove the anonymity, users are going to be much more positive if their comments and interactions will reflect on their reputation that is attached to their real name and identity. On The New Internet you can comment on every single page of the old internet but with your reputation on the line, you will be less likely to post something fictitious or negative.

Tell us how your technology works.

Just download the browser and you will get a sidebar to comment and rate every page on old and New Internet. On The New Internet there will be domains that have never before existed on the old Internet and you will be able to comment and rate those pages as well. Users can purchase any domain name they would like even if it is not available on the old Internet.

As our publication name suggests, we focus on the Internet of Things, specifically the Industrial IoT. How do you plan to roll your product out for IoT devices? Can you provide examples?  

On The New Internet every device will be attached to an authenticated user. This is particularly useful for drones and identifying the owner of the device. We will be able to monitor all IoT devices and if it is acting suspicious we can turn it off the network for further investigation.  

We’ve written about Bruce Schneier and his calls for government regulation to address security issues in the IoT. A part of your offering includes a solution for governments. What’s your take on regulation and where do you see Authenticated Reality playing a role?  

We would like to authenticate all users, entities and devices to enable a safe internet experience.

Do you see any authentication solutions in IoT at this time?  And at what point in the future do you think an IoT solution from Authenticated Reality will be available?   

Yes we have patented a IOT security device that we will release in a few months time that will allow IOT devices to get secured. This IOT security device will have a WiFi access point on it that IOT devices attach and register to and the device will keep them secure.

Anything else you’d like to add?

The New Internet is here and if you had the vision back in 80’s to take advantage of the old internet  you would be rich, now is your chance to have the vision and join the new internet early on.  Join at http://thenewinternet.com

Photo of and credit: Chris Ciabarra

 

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IoT Central Digest, April 4, 2017

Here are the latest featured articles from IoT Central members and contributors. In this issue we look at 5 cities that are doing right in smart city development, a fascinating infographic that will get you up to speed on the history of autonomous vehicles, explore who will survive the era of robots, and much more. 

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

5 Cities That Are Setting Trends in Smart City Development

Infographic: The Growth of the Autonomous Car Market

The invention of autonomous cars gained widespread public exposure in 1939’s world fair exhibition. Automakers had envisioned the car with an out of box abilities to drive through green valleys and palm trees on its own. Cars with a variety of techniques like radar sensors, video cameras, ultrasonic sensors and processing computers were to be designed to drive on roads.  

Managing the Risk of Dirty Data With a Pull-Based IoT Architecture

IoT Generalist vs IoT Specialist, Who will survive to the era of Robots?

Breaking Down the IDC Top 10 IoT Predictions for 2017

Guest post by Evan Birkhead.

A new IDC FutureScape offers top 10 predictions for the Worldwide IoT in 2017.  The research evaluates 10 emerging trends and ranks them in terms of their likely impact across the enterprise and the time it will take each prediction to go mainstream (meaning the middle of bellcurve of adoption). 

What is cognitive computing and how does it impact your future


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Infographic: Hotel Rooms of the Future

Today’s emerging technologies are likely to have a huge effect on many industries over the coming decades, hotel companies around the world are already taking advantage of some fairly game-changing devices such as robotic technology that will deliver luggage and room service quickly and efficiently to your hotel room.

But as yet, this kind of technology is not commonly seen in hotels, not just because of technological and cost limitations but also because of the period of mindset change required by consumers, people are used to having all of their queries and whims answered by a human, shifting that responsibility to a robot colleague can feel impersonal if not done well.

But some of the technologies that we are likely to see rolled out more universally will be in the actual rooms of the hotels themselves, this more unobtrusive IoT technology includes devices to display useful information quickly, help improve sleep and make sure in room tech and personal devices work in a truly connected, personalised and seamless manner.

To find out more check out this infographic put together by De Vere Hotels.

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"Trends in Smart City Development" is a new report from the National League of Cities featuring case studies about how five cities – Philadelphia, San Francisco, Chicago, Charlotte, N.C., and New Delhi, India – are using different approaches to implement smart city projects.

The report also provides recommendations to help local governments consider and plan smart city projects.

A "smart city" is one that has developed technological infrastructure that enables it to collect, aggregate, and analyze real-time data to improve the lives of its residents. The report suggests that any smart city effort should include explicit policy recommendations regarding smart infrastructure and data, a functioning administrative component, and some form of community engagement.

You can read the full report here. (PDF)

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The capital city of Ohio has proven to be a true innovator among U.S. Smart Cities, and has even been awarded the winner of the Department of Transportation’s Smart City Challenge. Columbus was chosen thanks to the city being a leader in innovative ideas that will transform the city to become greener, more efficient, and easier to live in. This is the first Smart City award in history, and it comes with some significant benefits for Columbus and its residents.

The most important, is a massive $40 million grant from the Department of Transportation. This will be supplemented by up to $10 million from Vulcan Inc., Paul G. Allen’s project and investment company. This $50 million will go towards a number of city initiatives, and is in addition to around $90 million that the city has already raised from private investors and partner companies.

Plans for the Future

The plans that secured Columbus the win are both ambitious, and holistically minded. Rather than just tackling one or a few different areas of the city for modernization, Columbus plans to invest in a number of different areas to benefit private residents, while supporting important sectors of the economy and attracting new investment.

A new rapid transit system will connect consumers to the main retail district of the city, and self-driving electric shuttles will be a major aspect of this system. This will not only provide easy access for consumers, but it will connect residents to jobs in the central districts of Columbus.

Healthcare is another major focus for smart innovations, and the new rapid transit systems will provide residents with easier access to facilities.

In addition to the rapid transit system, Columbus will implement new RFID technologies that will help to streamline toll payments, monitor traffic flow, and plan for future expansion and improvements based on road usage patterns.

A Worthy Winner of this Unprecedented Award

Columbus is the perfect city to be made the inaugural winner of the Smart City Challenge. Their innovations will help boost the economy and improve quality of life in one of America’s largest business and educational centers.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all.

For more info visit our website at IOT Recruiting

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The invention of autonomous cars gained widespread public exposure in 1939’s world fair exhibition. Automakers had envisioned the car with an out of box abilities to drive through green valleys and palm trees on its own. Cars with a variety of techniques like radar sensors, video cameras, ultrasonic sensors and processing computers were to be designed to drive on roads.  

People then were stunned and unable to believe whether this could be a reality. But today as technology is overpowering us, we can sense the future. Upcoming cars will be designed for a hassle-free ride and quick journey. According to Boston Consulting Group (after an in-depth study), global sale of autonomous cars might be more than 12 million till 2035.  

The infographic below by Get off road unveils the key points of autonomous cars. In order to understand brief about the history of autonomous cars, challenges faced by engineers during manufacturing and what the future holds for autonomous car market head on to the infographic.

There is a lot of IoT going into cars, and also a lot of code.

The Growth Of The Autonomous Car Market

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IoT Central Digest, March 22, 2017

IoT Central is currently at IBM's InterConnect Conference in Las Vegas. We will have a wrap up story later this week, but in the meantime we are tweeting about it here and here, and as well as posting here and here. Follow us!

In this issue, Ventana Research Director David Menninger looks at the technical and organizational challenges of IoT, Sandeep Raut continues his series on digital transformation, Fabrice Jadot goes deep with industrial communications, and Bill McCabe has five questions you should ask your IOT candidates before hiring them. Enjoy.

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

IoT Challenges Organization and Technological Readiness


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The Internet of Things (IoT) is a technology that extends digital connectivity to devices and sensors in homes, businesses, vehicles and potentially almost anywhere. This advance enables virtually any device to transmit its data, to which analytics can then be applied to facilitate monitoring and a range of operational functions. IoT can deliver value in several ways. It can provide organizations with more complete data about their operations, which helps them improve efficiencies and so reduce costs. It also can deliver a competitive advantage by enabling them to reduce the elapsed time between an event occurring and operational responses, actions taken or decisions made in response to it.

IoT utilizes what Ventana Research calls operational intelligence, a discipline that has evolved from the capture and analysis of data from instrumentation and machine-to-machine interactions of many types. We define operational intelligence as a set of event-centered information and analysis processes operating across an organization that deliver information to enable effective actions and optimal decisions.

The evolution of operational intelligence and its manifestation in IoT is encouraging companies to revisit their priorities and spending for information and other digital technologies. Ventana Research undertook benchmark research on The Internet of Things to determine the attitudes, requirements and future plans of organizations that use IoT and operational intelligence systems and to identify their best practices. We set out to examine both the commonalities and the qualities specific to major industry sectors and across sizes of organizations. We considered how organizations manage IoT, issues they encounter in the process and how their use of it and related technology is evolving.

While the Internet of Things may still be a novelty to many consumers, organizations participating in our research are well aware of its applications and implications. Four out of five (81%) said IoT is important to their future operations. Majorities said the use of IoT is very important to speed the flow of information and improve the responsiveness of individuals within business processes (61%) and to speed the flow of information to customers or consumers (58%).

The most common uses of IoT are associated with customers (as in sensors on products, by 43%), employees (in wearable technology, 35%) and sensors on devices in the supply chain (31%). At this point, however, more organizations are able to capture IT events (such as a network or system security breach, 59%) than business events (such as a customer contact, 45%). As organizations find more business uses, IoT and operational intelligence will become even more mainstream, and the research indicates that this will occur. Within two years, 95 percent of organizations said they expect to be capturing IT events and 92 percent to be capturing business events.

The research also finds that the intentions of organizations to embrace IoT and use operational intelligence often outpace their current capabilities. For example, many can capture data but face challenges in using it. More than two-thirds (68%) said they are satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their organization’s ability to capture and correlate data from events. After that, managing and using it become more complicated. Nearly one-third (31% each) reported difficulties with inadequate data or in managing external data. About half (48%) said they spend the most time reviewing event data for quality and consistency issues, which suggests a lack of standardization across the data sources that are collected.

Furthermore, most organizations are not ready to derive maximum value from IoT. The processes most commonly implemented, each by approximately half of organizations, are performing root-cause analysis, defining measurements and metrics, and monitoring and correlating activities or events. While these processes are necessary, they are only the first step in improving performance. Fewer have advanced to the point of automating processes, which will be necessary to make full use of the coming deluge of IoT data. For example, only about two in five use data from events to trigger automated processes such as predictive maintenance (38%) or automatic assignment of thresholds for alerts (39%).

This research overall finds strong momentum behind the emergence of the Internet of Things, but it also is clear that many organizations have not caught up to the trend. IoT is here, and its impact on business will only increase; almost all companies can benefit from paying attention to it. We encourage you to use this research to help educate and guide your organization through its IoT journey.


Regards,

David Menninger

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From early visionaries to futuristic applications, the Internet of Things was fueled by raw innovation in connectivity and robotics.

Guest post William Belk. This article originally appeared here.

~1900: Radio Control

~1985: Consumer Cellular Phone

http://mashable.com/2014/03/13/first-cellphone-on-sale/#EUMAjMjMcaqO

~1985: Electronic Toll Collection via Transmitter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_toll_collection

~2000: WIFI

~2000: RFID Passports

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_passport

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LinkedIn currently lists over 4000 jobs related to the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is built on many of the technologies that professionals are already familiar with including Internet Protocol (IP) experts, hardware engineers, and even GUI designers. This is an opportunity for many professionals to transition to new roles and projects directly related to IoT.  

Here are eight articles from long-time IoT Central contributor Bill McCabe that will help you find, recruit and advance your organization and careers in IoT.

How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

5 questions You Should Ask Your IOT Candidates Before Hiring Them

IOT Job Market/ Who is getting hired and Why?

The CIOTO is Your Next Must-Hire Role

The 5 Point Plan for IOT Recruitment

The Great IOT Recruiting Rush

Top Three Skills for Data Security Pros

Internet of Things: Job Killer or Job Creator?

Photo credit: Synapse Wireless

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IoT Central Digest, March 14, 2017

Here's the latest IoT Central Digest. We have cars, some final thoughts on Mobile World Congress, a look at LTE, Bluetooth 5 and a link to the top 100 Industrial IoT companies.  

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT-Connected Car of Today— Cases From Hertz, Nokia, NTT, Mojio & Concur Technologies

Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

Could it Be LTE? Identifying a Standard for the Internet of Things

MWC- The Great Illusionists Show

TOP 100 Industrial IoT Companies Index


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Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

I recently attended Mobile World Congress (#MWC17) in Barcelona where SAP announced its collaboration with Hertz, Nokia and Concur Technologies. The purpose of this new partnership is to leverage IoT to offer an intelligent, automated experience to car users. SAP also announced its collaboration with Mojio, the connected vehicle platform and app provider for T-Mobile USA and Deutsche Telekom. The integration of Mojio’s cloud computing capabilities with SAP Vehicles Network will make parking and fueling process a breeze for users. From enabling drivers to reserve a parking spot based on calendar events to expense management for business travelers, SAP’s collaboration with these companies is likely to accelerate the development of connected cars. 

In this article, I have discussed the cases that caught my interest and that, in my opinion, are likely to progress and evolve into something revolutionary. 

Mojio — The IoT Connected Car 

Mojio ‘s new smart car technology is set to create an automotive ecosystem that will allow the automotive, insurance, and telecom industry to thrive together. The recent news that Mojio plans to connect 500,000 vehicles to its cloud platform in the first phase gives us a clue about the technology is really taking off and the idea of ‘connected cars’ is likely to become a reality soon. 

Mojio’s Data Analytics Capabilities

The open connected car platform introduced by Mojio has advanced data collection and analytical capabilities. The data collected by the sophisticated telematics device can be categorized into three types — contextual, behavioral, and diagnostic. Using mathematical and statistical modeling, Mojio discovers meaningful patterns and draw conclusions from data to allow companies to better understand the needs, behaviors, and expectations of their customers and drive product and service improvements. 

Here’s how it all works. 

  • Behavioral Data — Mojio’s telematics device gathers information about speed, steering, and braking inputs to determine driver’s fatigue level and issue alerts. Long-term driving behavior data can also be used to help the user adopt a more fuel efficient driving style and calculate risk by insurance companies. 
  • Diagnostic Data — With the ability to access vehicle’s data remotely, car manufacturers can assess the health of a vehicle and combine this capability with in-car voice communication to notify customers when service is required. 
  • Contextual Data — Led by Google and Amazon, contextual targeting of advertisements based on the search data of an individual has become a usual practice in the digital world. Mojio is using the same principle to offer more personalized advice to car drivers. It enriches the behavioral and contextual data of a customer with geolocation data, posted speed limits, and updated traffic flow conditions to provide valuable recommendations to the driver.

Data Sharing Outside the Connected Car Ecosystem 

Mojio has evolved from being a ‘service provider’ to a ‘system integrator’ and it now works with Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and other companies to offer all the services a user may need in an integrated, unfragmented manner. Built on SAP Vehicles Network, the Connected Car Ecosystem introduces users to a new level of convenience and comfort. Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, users can now ask Amazon Alexa questions about their newly connected car, such as "Alexa, ask Mojio how much fuel my car has left."

Future Possibilities: A Value Chain in Flux

Mojio has partnered with a number of companies, including Amazon Alexa, Dooing, IFTTT, FleetLeed, and Spot Angels. The integration of the value chains of these companies will mean improved convenience and better personalized services to customers. While the possibilities are unlimited, I have listed a couple of examples here to help you get an idea of the potential of this technology. 

Logistical providers — Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, you can request Amazon/UPS/DHL/FedEx to deliver an order directly to the boot of your car. Amazon will find your car using the geolocation data, enter a security code to open the luggage compartment, and leave your parcel while you’re in a meeting or having your lunch at a restaurant.

IFTTT — The integration of Mojio and IFTTT means that your calendar will be automatically updated based on your travel habits. Not only this, you will be able to set triggers and actions as well, such as:

  • When my vehicle ignition turns on, mute my Android tone. 
  • Track new trips in a Google spreadsheet. 
  • Receive a notification when Mojio senses that my car’s battery is low. 

SpotAngel — Did you know that Mojio could save you money? The partnership of Mojio with SpotAngel will allow you to receive alerts for street cleaning, alternate side parking, or parking meters, helping you avoid parking tickets. 

The possibilities are virtually unlimited. For example, if Mojio partners with a call center, then businesses will be able to get voice recordings of calls made by customers for roadside assistance or directions and use this information to ensure quality control or for CRM. 

Hertz — The Rent-a-Car Company Ready to Use IoT to Improve Its Customer Experience

Hertz is set to become the first car rental company to use the Internet of Things to offer improved services to its customers. It announced its decision to join SAP Vehicles Network in the conference that I recently attended. Being a member of the SAP Vehicles Network, that currently comprises of leading names like Nokia, Concur Technologies, and Mojio, will allow Hertz to elevate the car-rental experience of its customers by providing them personalized advice and services. 

Hertz is likely to integrate travel and itinerary planning along with in-car personalization to deliver just what the client needs. In addition to this, the integration of Concur’s TripLink will be particularly beneficial for business travelers. The app will aggregate all the travel-related expenses, including fuel and parking fees to allow customers to generate a single expense report for the entire trip. Using Concur’s TripLink business travelers will be able to a single click to submit their trip expense report immediately after the trip is completed.

Nokia to Offer Robust, Multi-Layered Security to Connected Cars

Nokia has designed a horizontal solution to address the challenges posed by the fragmented and complex IoT ecosystem that comprises of disparate devices and applications. Titled ‘Intelligent Management Platform for All Connected Things’ (IMPACT), the new solution offers connectivity, data collection, analytics, and business application development capabilities across all verticals. 

Using IMPACT, service providers will be able to assume a competitive position in the market by offering them a number of value-adding options, such as:

  • IMPACT will monitor traffic flow to offer real-time updates to customers. 
  • Personalization of driver settings and entertainment systems. 
  • Remote monitoring of speed, fuel levels, and other metrics for vehicle diagnostics and predictive maintenance. 

Improved Safety with Live Transportation Monitoring 

Apart from Nokia, Hertz, and Mojio, SAP is also working with NTT to devise a state-of-the-art solution that can improve the safety of public transport. The solution, which is called Live Transportation Monitoring, has three components — NTT’s IoT analytics platform, SAP’s connected transportation safety portal, and hitoe® — a fabric that will used to manufacture drivers’ workwear. 

This fabric is coated with a conductive polymer which will help the service provider monitor the driving behavior and key health parameters of drivers from a remote location in a real time manner. The data will be presented on SAP’s connected transportation safety portal (as exhibited in the photo below). This way, public transportation companies will be able to ensure complete safety of their passengers, as well monitor the health of their employees and vehicles. 

Combined, all these technologies have the potential to make the driving experience of customers sager, more convenient, and less costly. Also, since this is a relatively new market, we can expect new players to join hands, gain a foothold, and push the boundaries of what’s possible with IoT.

What do you think of these new developments? Don’t forget to like the article, share your comments and insights. 

If you would like to read Ronald van Loon future posts then please click 'Follow' and feel free to also connect on LinkedIn and Twitter

This post originally appeared here.

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IoT Central Digest, March 6, 2017

We cover a lot of ground in this issue of the IoT Central Digest. Edge, fog, and cloud computing are all touched on by new and returning contributors. We also look at security and blockchain, as well as explore IoT use cases with Visa, Airbus, Bosch and SNCF. 

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT Architecture at the Edge

This article aims to focus on edge side of IoT Architectures where all things are. The edge is the place where all event data are generated and automated actions occurs, and because that it must be managed and secured. It also includes a wide array of sensors, actuators, and devices which interact and communicate real-time data each other and with cloud services.

Mobile World Congress and the Pain in Spain

Posted by David Oro

As Mobile World Congress kicks off in Barcelona this week, Avast, a security company, has a warning for the citizens of Spain: There are over 5 million vulnerable IoT devices across the country.

The Era of Machine Learning (ML), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robotics and Internet of Things (IoT) is Here.


Network Error: Challenges to IoT Adoption in Southeast Asia


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18 Articles on IoT and Security

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Guest post by Evan Birkhead.

A new IDC FutureScape offers top 10 predictions for the Worldwide IoT in 2017.  The research evaluates 10 emerging trends and ranks them in terms of their likely impact across the enterprise and the time it will take each prediction to go mainstream (meaning the middle of bellcurve of adoption). 

We took a close look and found that the list provides an excellent starting point for enterprises – particular industrials - that are steadily getting pulled toward the Industrial Internet and need to learn more.  Let’s break it down.

The diagram shows IDC’s 10 predictions. The size of the bubble provides a rough indicator of the complexity and/or cost that an enterprise will incur when acting on the prediction.  The X axis shows the time until a trend becomes mainstream; the Y axis shows the impact on the enterprise organization, with the upper tier showing company-wide impact.  So, for example, #10 IoT Analytics presents the most costly and complex technology issue for organizations and its departmental impact is limited, so its mainstream acceptance won’t occur for a couple more years.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 1: Open Data Platforms Emerge

By 2018, IDC says the "Open Data Platform" will emerge as the next frontier in platform discussions. We are already seeing this with organizations such as the Industrial Internet Consortium and the OpenFog Consortium, who are specifying open frameworks for IoT computing and communications. While this may cause confusion for early adopters, open platforms will pave the way for mainstream acceptance.

Prediction 2:  LPWAN Conflict

Despite hype on the benefits of Low-Power Wide Area Networks (LoRa, Sigfox, etc.), IDC predicts organizations won’t begin to adopt it for another year due to a lack of QoS – and then only for non-critical applications.  Keep an eye on this space though, as low-power WiFi for IoT sensor-based networks will make sense across many industries.

Prediction 3: Cycle Time Improvements

This one is farthest off in the future but could be the most important because it unlocks one of the key values of the Industrial Internet – more efficient production of products and services. According to IDC, by next year investments in operational sensing through IoT and situational awareness via analytics will deliver 30% in critical process cycle times.

Prediction 4: Blockchain Realized

By unifying data logs for a variety of industries, blockchained services, which typically leverage the cloud, promise to increase productivity and reduce downtime.  For example, manufacturers will be able to share production logs with OEMs and regulators, reducing the time to find information, resolve disputes, verify transactions and expedite deliveries.

Prediction 5: Security Evolves

As we at Bayshore know, industrial enterprises are now addressing the cultural divide between IT and OT. This will lead to a necessary investment in capabilities to protect their production processes and data from cyber attack and privacy breaches. IDC says that in two years more than 75% of device manufacturers will have improved their security and privacy capabilities.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 6: Industry Growth

IDC puts the initial worldwide IoT industry growth at the end of 2017.  Will that be the beginning of the “hockey stick?”  The initial markets driving the growth will be connected vehicles, insurance telematics, personal wellness, and smart buildings, accounting for $96 billion in spending.

Prediction 7: IoT/IT Services

As adoption of IoT grows, IDC predicts that 75% of IoT adopters will turn to outside firms for help in strategy, planning, development, implementation, and/or management of these initiatives.  Again, this is a trend we can verify from our experience at Bayshore.  We are seeing an increased customer reliance on carriers, cloud providers, systems integrators, machine vendors, and an emerging class of Industrial IoT architectural experts.

Prediction 8: The Edge

While we are still looking for a universally accepted definition of edge computing, there is consensus on its importance in the success of IoT.  IDC says that in two years at least 40% of IoT-created data will be stored, processed, analyzed and acted upon close to, or at, the edge of the network.

Prediction 9: Smart City Assets

At Bayshore, we are seeing the same thing. Metropolitan areas, paced by progressive CIOs in places as diverse as Barcelona, Chicago, and San Diego, are already reaping the benefits of sensor consolidation and analytics.  Look for more and more success stories in areas such as building automation, utilities, traffic management, and data center management. According to IDC, 40% of local and regional governments “will use IoT to turn infrastructure into assets Instead of liabilities” by 2019.

Prediction 10: Analytics and IoT Collide

We agree that this is the mother of all trends. While analytics is the most complex technical and cultural issue, it is clearly the #1 reason to move to the Industrial Internet.  IDC predicts that by 2019, all effective IoT efforts will merge streaming analytics with machine learning trained on data lakes, data marts, and content stores, accelerated by discrete or integrated processors.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions

The Bayshore IT/OT Gateway is used by industrial enterprises to provide IT with visibility into big OT data and to provide OT with access to applications such as advanced IT analytics. Transformation of OT data (Modbus TCP, DNP3, Ethernet/IP, and so on), into formats that can be interpreted by IT analytics programs (JSON, https, http, etc.) will be crucial to this adoption.

This post originally appeared here

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10 Articles on Manufacturing and IoT

This resource is part of a series of specific topics related to the Internet of Things. To keep receiving these articles, sign up on IoT Central

 

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