Subscribe to our Newsletter | To Post On IoT Central, Click here


Featured Posts (263)

You might have probably heard about the artificial intelligence being developed by some big researchers around the world. The current period of era is also about creating technology that not only process faster, but also works efficiently just like the human brain.

The innovation in such technologies has given rise to cognitive computing, which nothing but another miracle innovative development by a human brain to let the machine learn just like human being. Recently, IBM with its new cognitive system called as IBM Watson have entered into the segment of artificial learning to make system that is capable of learning and understanding knowledge to interact with human in a more natural way.

The cognitive computing is a self-learning technology platform that uses data mining and pattern recognition to simulate itself in a way that human brain works. The system is intended to solve some complex affairs involving big data with the power of natural learning and language processing mechanism. Cognitive computing has been claimed to be a future of artificial intelligence which has numerous application in robotics and VR.

The initiative of IBM to expand the cognitive computing adoption has been followed by IBM collaboration with SoftBank in which both the organization is trying to bring the IBM Watson in Japan. The collaboration is intended to let the Watson learn how to communicate in Japanese, and to exploit its capabilities.


The system will be in the hand of some developers and technology enthusiastic working on AI to create new services and apps in Japan which will be powered by the Watson. Japan is the one of largest country in terms of technology that is going to give a head start in the expansion of adoption of cognitive computing system around the world.

On the basis of IBM study, the cognitive computing system is going to shape the future in three following ways:

Engagement
Working with cognitive computing system will open the space of expert assistance that is not possible when human works alone. The capability of system to have a vast and deep insight will play an important role in consuming wide range of structured as well as unstructured data and knowledge. The recent announcement of USAA regarding usage of IBM Watson as an engagement advisor to military has confirmed that these systems are capable of shaping the future of humans.

Decision
Cognitive computing system works purely on evidence by processing new data and information and analysing the outcome of the action. It is going to help humans in taking better decisions using the recommendation provided by the system. The thought process of this system is backed by the quantitative confidence score that will generate the result based on the merit after evaluation of several options.

Discovery
There are several unlocked data and information which may not be discovered by human ever in the future. The adoption of cognitive system will help in discovering new research in various fields like cancer research to the life better for humans. Human researcher’s brain takes decades to formulate one single research, but the cognitive computing system can process the same data with much faster speed and deep insight of the topic.

Cognitive computing system is an amazing opportunity in transforming several industries. It’s just a matter of time and everything around us will be machine based.

Read more…

Guest post by Evan Birkhead.

A new IDC FutureScape offers top 10 predictions for the Worldwide IoT in 2017.  The research evaluates 10 emerging trends and ranks them in terms of their likely impact across the enterprise and the time it will take each prediction to go mainstream (meaning the middle of bellcurve of adoption). 

We took a close look and found that the list provides an excellent starting point for enterprises – particular industrials - that are steadily getting pulled toward the Industrial Internet and need to learn more.  Let’s break it down.

The diagram shows IDC’s 10 predictions. The size of the bubble provides a rough indicator of the complexity and/or cost that an enterprise will incur when acting on the prediction.  The X axis shows the time until a trend becomes mainstream; the Y axis shows the impact on the enterprise organization, with the upper tier showing company-wide impact.  So, for example, #10 IoT Analytics presents the most costly and complex technology issue for organizations and its departmental impact is limited, so its mainstream acceptance won’t occur for a couple more years.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 1: Open Data Platforms Emerge

By 2018, IDC says the "Open Data Platform" will emerge as the next frontier in platform discussions. We are already seeing this with organizations such as the Industrial Internet Consortium and the OpenFog Consortium, who are specifying open frameworks for IoT computing and communications. While this may cause confusion for early adopters, open platforms will pave the way for mainstream acceptance.

Prediction 2:  LPWAN Conflict

Despite hype on the benefits of Low-Power Wide Area Networks (LoRa, Sigfox, etc.), IDC predicts organizations won’t begin to adopt it for another year due to a lack of QoS – and then only for non-critical applications.  Keep an eye on this space though, as low-power WiFi for IoT sensor-based networks will make sense across many industries.

Prediction 3: Cycle Time Improvements

This one is farthest off in the future but could be the most important because it unlocks one of the key values of the Industrial Internet – more efficient production of products and services. According to IDC, by next year investments in operational sensing through IoT and situational awareness via analytics will deliver 30% in critical process cycle times.

Prediction 4: Blockchain Realized

By unifying data logs for a variety of industries, blockchained services, which typically leverage the cloud, promise to increase productivity and reduce downtime.  For example, manufacturers will be able to share production logs with OEMs and regulators, reducing the time to find information, resolve disputes, verify transactions and expedite deliveries.

Prediction 5: Security Evolves

As we at Bayshore know, industrial enterprises are now addressing the cultural divide between IT and OT. This will lead to a necessary investment in capabilities to protect their production processes and data from cyber attack and privacy breaches. IDC says that in two years more than 75% of device manufacturers will have improved their security and privacy capabilities.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 6: Industry Growth

IDC puts the initial worldwide IoT industry growth at the end of 2017.  Will that be the beginning of the “hockey stick?”  The initial markets driving the growth will be connected vehicles, insurance telematics, personal wellness, and smart buildings, accounting for $96 billion in spending.

Prediction 7: IoT/IT Services

As adoption of IoT grows, IDC predicts that 75% of IoT adopters will turn to outside firms for help in strategy, planning, development, implementation, and/or management of these initiatives.  Again, this is a trend we can verify from our experience at Bayshore.  We are seeing an increased customer reliance on carriers, cloud providers, systems integrators, machine vendors, and an emerging class of Industrial IoT architectural experts.

Prediction 8: The Edge

While we are still looking for a universally accepted definition of edge computing, there is consensus on its importance in the success of IoT.  IDC says that in two years at least 40% of IoT-created data will be stored, processed, analyzed and acted upon close to, or at, the edge of the network.

Prediction 9: Smart City Assets

At Bayshore, we are seeing the same thing. Metropolitan areas, paced by progressive CIOs in places as diverse as Barcelona, Chicago, and San Diego, are already reaping the benefits of sensor consolidation and analytics.  Look for more and more success stories in areas such as building automation, utilities, traffic management, and data center management. According to IDC, 40% of local and regional governments “will use IoT to turn infrastructure into assets Instead of liabilities” by 2019.

Prediction 10: Analytics and IoT Collide

We agree that this is the mother of all trends. While analytics is the most complex technical and cultural issue, it is clearly the #1 reason to move to the Industrial Internet.  IDC predicts that by 2019, all effective IoT efforts will merge streaming analytics with machine learning trained on data lakes, data marts, and content stores, accelerated by discrete or integrated processors.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions

The Bayshore IT/OT Gateway is used by industrial enterprises to provide IT with visibility into big OT data and to provide OT with access to applications such as advanced IT analytics. Transformation of OT data (Modbus TCP, DNP3, Ethernet/IP, and so on), into formats that can be interpreted by IT analytics programs (JSON, https, http, etc.) will be crucial to this adoption.

This post originally appeared here

Read more…

IoT Central Digest, March 22, 2017

IoT Central is currently at IBM's InterConnect Conference in Las Vegas. We will have a wrap up story later this week, but in the meantime we are tweeting about it here and here, and as well as posting here and here. Follow us!

In this issue, Ventana Research Director David Menninger looks at the technical and organizational challenges of IoT, Sandeep Raut continues his series on digital transformation, Fabrice Jadot goes deep with industrial communications, and Bill McCabe has five questions you should ask your IOT candidates before hiring them. Enjoy.

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

IoT Challenges Organization and Technological Readiness


Follow us on Twitter | Join our LinkedIn group | Members Only | For Bloggers | Subscribe
Read more…

Numerous Reasons Why Digital Transformation Fails

Many organizations today have realized that digital transformation is essential to their success.
But many of them forget that focus of a digital transformation is not digitization or even technology, it is the Customer!
Digital Transformation is not easy or small endeavor for any business. Several levers will need to be turned in unison just to ensure resources are aligned and budgets are not being wasted.
Many a times I have seen that the top boss is not digital savvy. In such cases without top leadership, they are unlikely to have real impact on their road to digital.
Another reason is, many companies focus on siloed, just few digital projects instead of overall business model transformation. Such independent, tactical initiatives, which are costly and create bad publicity inside and outside the organization.
I had a worst experience with one of the largest telecom company. While acquiring customers they go out the way to give everything free and promise everything digital. But their customer service is pathetic. I just wanted to disconnect my internet dongle and it was not possible online. I had to call customer service 5-6 times, every time I was kept on hold saying they are checking system status.  At one time, when I got frustrated I asked why it is painful just to disconnect, the rep told me sir your call has just consumed 39 seconds and we are trained to hold customer for more than a minute!!! See how they earn money at customer’s cost.
Finally they told me go and sort it out in one of their store. Again no digital there – I had to fill out a hard copy form, provide all my id proofs again, and I was told it will take 10 more days to just disconnect the service, so I have to pay for those 10 days.  What is worst is, I again get a bill after 1 month that I have not paid latest bill.
From the telecom’s perspective, they think they have done everything right for digital transformation:
1. They have provided online access to manage account; 
2. They have a sleek mobile app
3. They have provided access to a 24x7 customer support line
4. Their web site UX and design gives good online experience
5. They provide email updates letting customers know the status on their requests.
But if they had walked in customer’s shoes, to identify instances where things could do wrong and address them quickly, it would have been more successful.
If with everything at the end the customer experience is bad it is a failure.
Lack of clear vision - Often times, companies that are not succeeding simply haven't painted a clear picture of what they want or need to be, when they digitally "grow up."
Poor internal communication within employees is another critical reason to fail. All the customer touch points don’t communicate with each other to have single version of customer truth. A comprehensive use of Big Data Analytics is essential to have all the details of customer at service rep’s fingertips.
Amazon, Netflix and Uber digital success stories have the effective gathering, storing and leveraging of customer data at the core.
Forrester has cited example of digital transformation failure at BBC for weak project management, reporting, lack of focus on business change.
Which reasons resonate with you? Happy to hear your thoughts!
Read more…

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a technology that extends digital connectivity to devices and sensors in homes, businesses, vehicles and potentially almost anywhere. This advance enables virtually any device to transmit its data, to which analytics can then be applied to facilitate monitoring and a range of operational functions. IoT can deliver value in several ways. It can provide organizations with more complete data about their operations, which helps them improve efficiencies and so reduce costs. It also can deliver a competitive advantage by enabling them to reduce the elapsed time between an event occurring and operational responses, actions taken or decisions made in response to it.

IoT utilizes what Ventana Research calls operational intelligence, a discipline that has evolved from the capture and analysis of data from instrumentation and machine-to-machine interactions of many types. We define operational intelligence as a set of event-centered information and analysis processes operating across an organization that deliver information to enable effective actions and optimal decisions.

The evolution of operational intelligence and its manifestation in IoT is encouraging companies to revisit their priorities and spending for information and other digital technologies. Ventana Research undertook benchmark research on The Internet of Things to determine the attitudes, requirements and future plans of organizations that use IoT and operational intelligence systems and to identify their best practices. We set out to examine both the commonalities and the qualities specific to major industry sectors and across sizes of organizations. We considered how organizations manage IoT, issues they encounter in the process and how their use of it and related technology is evolving.

While the Internet of Things may still be a novelty to many consumers, organizations participating in our research are well aware of its applications and implications. Four out of five (81%) said IoT is important to their future operations. Majorities said the use of IoT is very important to speed the flow of information and improve the responsiveness of individuals within business processes (61%) and to speed the flow of information to customers or consumers (58%).

The most common uses of IoT are associated with customers (as in sensors on products, by 43%), employees (in wearable technology, 35%) and sensors on devices in the supply chain (31%). At this point, however, more organizations are able to capture IT events (such as a network or system security breach, 59%) than business events (such as a customer contact, 45%). As organizations find more business uses, IoT and operational intelligence will become even more mainstream, and the research indicates that this will occur. Within two years, 95 percent of organizations said they expect to be capturing IT events and 92 percent to be capturing business events.

The research also finds that the intentions of organizations to embrace IoT and use operational intelligence often outpace their current capabilities. For example, many can capture data but face challenges in using it. More than two-thirds (68%) said they are satisfied or somewhat satisfied with their organization’s ability to capture and correlate data from events. After that, managing and using it become more complicated. Nearly one-third (31% each) reported difficulties with inadequate data or in managing external data. About half (48%) said they spend the most time reviewing event data for quality and consistency issues, which suggests a lack of standardization across the data sources that are collected.

Furthermore, most organizations are not ready to derive maximum value from IoT. The processes most commonly implemented, each by approximately half of organizations, are performing root-cause analysis, defining measurements and metrics, and monitoring and correlating activities or events. While these processes are necessary, they are only the first step in improving performance. Fewer have advanced to the point of automating processes, which will be necessary to make full use of the coming deluge of IoT data. For example, only about two in five use data from events to trigger automated processes such as predictive maintenance (38%) or automatic assignment of thresholds for alerts (39%).

This research overall finds strong momentum behind the emergence of the Internet of Things, but it also is clear that many organizations have not caught up to the trend. IoT is here, and its impact on business will only increase; almost all companies can benefit from paying attention to it. We encourage you to use this research to help educate and guide your organization through its IoT journey.


Regards,

David Menninger

Read more…

Guest post by Fabrice Jadot. This blog originally appeared here

Some of us are old enough to remember the days just before the internet became a permanent fixture in our lives. At that time, the IT industry had been struggling for years to come up with a way to harmonize disparate proprietary communication protocols. The goal was to make it easier for computer systems to talk to each other and share data.  At first, unifying the protocols proved frustrating and costly workarounds were necessary to help facilitate the flow of communications.  Then, gradually, a tipping point was reached. The economics of connectivity changed dramatically, vendor and user attitudes became more open, standards bodies coalesced, and communications technology advancements (like TCP/IP) allowed the floodgates to open.

Today, manufacturing and process industries find themselves in a similar “pre-internet” dilemma. Within the context of control systems and field devices, proprietary protocols are the rule as opposed to the exception. Although some standardized protocols are beginning to emerge, many of these will not interoperate without configuring specialized gateways that add cost and complexity.

Such a situation places constraints on the ability of industrial organizations to cash in on the promise of the new Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) wave of technological and productivity advancements.

But there is hope.  Progress towards a converged communication protocol environment is being made on several fronts.  Consider the following…

Figure 1 Automation Pyramid

Some layers of the industrial automation pyramid are becoming more open– The theoretical layers of the industrial automation pyramid include field devices at the bottom (i.e., actuators, sensors, hardware), then a controller layer (i.e., PLCs), then a supervisory / control layer (SCADA, MES), and finally, a top enterprise-wide layer (i.e., ERP).

The good news is that, at the controller layer, a standard called OPC UA (Object linking and embedding for Process Control Unified Architecture) is emerging.  The OPC UA standard is a series of specifications that are being jointly developed by industry vendors, end-users and software developers. The OPC UA standards specify the communication of industrial process data, alarms and events, historical data and batch process data.  Key control systems vendors are beginning to build and design products that conform to OPC UA standards. OPC UA is platform independent and ensures the seamless flow of information among devices at the controller layer from multiple vendors. The OPC Foundation is responsible for the development and maintenance of this standard.

Unfortunately, at the layer below, where field devices communicate across to other field devices and up to controllers, the standardization situation is still murky. As a result of the dominance of separate, proprietary protocols, a “field bus war” has been fought for many years. End users are bearing the brunt of the resulting extra cost by having to install and support gateways in order to interpret the data based on the different proprietary protocols.

A new Time Sensitive Network (TSN) standard could inadvertently accelerate convergence at the field device level – TSN is a new standard that is currently under development by IEEE. It’s not yet completely finalized, but it is well advanced. One of the main purposes of the standard is to address the issue of time sensitive data (real time data).  TSN is exploring ways to standardize the definition of “real-time data” and to assure that mission-critical, time-sensitive data can be transferred and shared within strict bounds of latency and reliability. Also under consideration is how time sensitive data can avoid being held up on networks that will become increasingly congested with IIoT data.

Figure 2 Industrial Communication Stack

Although not a goal of TSN, movement towards more converged industrial protocol standardization at the field device level could result, with TSN working to harmonize all of the layers across the industrial communication stack (except for the application layer), as shown in figure 2.

Such a unified industrial protocol will allow organizations across the industry to accelerate the benefits they can derive from the data that they already have in-house and from the future data they process.

Read more…

From early visionaries to futuristic applications, the Internet of Things was fueled by raw innovation in connectivity and robotics.

Guest post William Belk. This article originally appeared here.

~1900: Radio Control

~1985: Consumer Cellular Phone

http://mashable.com/2014/03/13/first-cellphone-on-sale/#EUMAjMjMcaqO

~1985: Electronic Toll Collection via Transmitter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_toll_collection

~2000: WIFI

~2000: RFID Passports

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_passport

Read more…

Tripwire, Inc., a security company, recently announced the results of a study conducted in partnership with Dimensional Research.  The study looked at the rise of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) deployment in organizations, and to what extent it is expected to cause security problems in 2017.  

The big not so surprise: 96 Percent of IT Security Professionals Expect an Increase in Cybersecurity Attacks on Industrial Internet of Things.

Yes, you should expect to get hacked.  

Robert Westervelt, security research manager at IDC said in a statement: “As Industrial companies pursue IIoT, it’s important to understand the new threats that can impact critical operations. Greater connectivity with operational technology (OT) exposes operational teams to the types of attacks that IT teams are used to seeing, but with even higher stakes. The concern for a cyber attack is no longer focused on loss of data, but safety and availability. Consider an energy utility as an example - cyber attacks could disrupt power supply for communities and potentially have impact to life and safety.”

Key findings include:

  • 96 percent of those surveyed expect to see an increase in security attacks on IIoT in 2017 
  • 51 percent said they do NOT feel prepared for security attacks that abuse, exploit, or maliciously leverage insecure IIoT devices
  • 64 percent said they already recognize the need to protect against attacks against IIoT, as they gain popularity with hackers
  • 90 percent expect IIoT deployment to increase 
  • 94 percent expect IIoT to increase risk and vulnerability in their organization

The study was commissioned by Tripwire and carried out by Dimensional Research in January 2017. A total of 403 qualified participants completed the survey. All participants had responsibility for IT security as a significant part of their job and worked at companies with more than 1,000 employees. Survey respondents were based in the United States (278), the United Kingdom (44), Canada (28) and Europe (53). 

Read more about IoT and security on IoT Central. To receive these articles, sign up on IoT Central

Read more…

LinkedIn currently lists over 4000 jobs related to the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is built on many of the technologies that professionals are already familiar with including Internet Protocol (IP) experts, hardware engineers, and even GUI designers. This is an opportunity for many professionals to transition to new roles and projects directly related to IoT.  

Here are eight articles from long-time IoT Central contributor Bill McCabe that will help you find, recruit and advance your organization and careers in IoT.

How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

5 questions You Should Ask Your IOT Candidates Before Hiring Them

IOT Job Market/ Who is getting hired and Why?

The CIOTO is Your Next Must-Hire Role

The 5 Point Plan for IOT Recruitment

The Great IOT Recruiting Rush

Top Three Skills for Data Security Pros

Internet of Things: Job Killer or Job Creator?

Photo credit: Synapse Wireless

Read more…

IoT Central Digest, March 14, 2017

Here's the latest IoT Central Digest. We have cars, some final thoughts on Mobile World Congress, a look at LTE, Bluetooth 5 and a link to the top 100 Industrial IoT companies.  

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT-Connected Car of Today— Cases From Hertz, Nokia, NTT, Mojio & Concur Technologies

Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

Could it Be LTE? Identifying a Standard for the Internet of Things

MWC- The Great Illusionists Show

TOP 100 Industrial IoT Companies Index


Follow us on Twitter | Join our LinkedIn group | Members Only | For Bloggers | Subscribe
Read more…

How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

The internet of things is the future of technology. If you plan on getting a position that relies heavily on it, there are a few simple things you can do to ensure success.

First, understand what the company does and their approach to the IoT. If the company makes connected thermostats, you’ll want to ensure you have some knowledge about that area of expertise. If they manage a series of connected devices on a production line, you need working knowledge of how to interact and program those elements. Not every device is the same, so make sure you understand what knowledge is required for the position you are interested in. After all, simply operating these devices is vastly different from programming them.

Next, remember that the tiny details matter. Have you had experience with a particular system or code? Make sure you mention it. While your resume is a good outline for who you are, your knowledge and level of comfort with the topic during your interview will actually have more of an impact.

This means also taking the time to understand the company. Do your research and find out what projects they are working on. If their focus is on new avenues of technology you can briefly talk about it. When you don’t show any genuine interest in the company or knowledge, you put yourself in a position where the interviewer doesn’t take you as seriously.

Your first impression is also key. While it is important to know your stuff, also prove you have the desire to be there. Make sure you show up no more than 5 minutes early to your interview. Make sure you are cordial to all staff, including the receptionist. Many companies watch how potential employees interact with what are deemed “lower” importance employees. If you are rude, condescending, or cold they will find out and it could cost you a job. Ultimately, all employees in a company have a valuable purpose and no one position can do their job without the others ensuring the office functions.

Finally, make sure you read up on the latest internet of technology news pieces that come out. Did a major company announce a new revolutionary advancement? Then you’ll want to mention it. This shows you stay current and if you discover something that manager doesn’t know, they might see you as an invaluable expert in the industry. That could help you to nail that interview and go on to make waves in the industry.

About Bill McCabe/ SoftNet Search Partners and Internetofthingsrecruiting.com

Top 50 IOT Authority on Twitter - per IoT Central

#1 IOT Recruitment Thought Leader In The World

If you require the top 5% of IOT talent let’s talk. Drop me a line or use this link to schedule an IOT Search Assessment Call http://internetofthingsrecruiting.com/schedule-a-conference/

OR Contact me at 303-337-7871

Read more…

IOT Job Market/ Who is getting hired and Why ?

As the Internet of Things becomes more important for companies of all sizes, Information Technology professionals are beginning to seek out roles related to this growing niche. The Internet of Things is built on many of the technologies that professionals are already familiar with. Internet Protocol (IP) experts, hardware engineers, and even GUI designers could find themselves working on IoT projects in companies ranging from startups, to the technology giants that are driving the industry.

If one were to ask; “what kind of field do I need to be in to land a job in IoT?”, the answer would not be simple. IoT works on many layers. Software plays a key role in usability and functionality. Network layers are key to infrastructure, and hardware layers define the capabilities and development opportunities involved in any IoT system. Perhaps a better way to find out what is required of IoT professionals, would be to take information from some of the opportunities that are available in the job market right now.

Take Amazon as an example. Amazon AWS is the online retail giant’s cloud services arm. Cloud systems like Amazon S3 power some of the most widely adopted cloud computing systems in use today. To be considered for a role on a team working within AWS, the qualifications are no different to most IT development roles. A Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science, professional experience (4+ years is a must), fundamentals in object design, and programming proficiency in a contemporary programming language will at least ensure a candidate’s resume is looked at.

But this doesn’t paint the full picture. Businesses who engage in IoT technologies are businesses who are invested in the future. This means that they’re seeking forward thinking professionals. Meeting the requirements where it comes to academic achievement is only part of what it takes to make it in IoT.

Last year, Forbes published a number of articles on what it would take to make it in the growing IoT industry. According to Forbes, the necessary qualities go beyond academia, and incorporate more soft skills and innovative thought.

High on the list was associative thinking. Collaborators who can integrate varying strategies and concepts were also tipped to be in demand. Finally, professionals who can communicate complex ideas easily through speech, written word, and abstract methods were considered more likely to be successful in the IoT niche than those who were only proficient in their technical field.

Take a look at the job market on any given day, and you will find dozens of IoT related jobs advertised by high profile tech companies. The second quarter of 2015 has seen positions opening at Dell and IBM (Software Development), Verizon (IoT Product Management), and Accenture (IoT Delivery Consultants), to name just a few.

The reason these companies are hiring in IoT is simple; it is the next big thing. Technology firms like Dell and IBM have a vested interest. Their core products and services are built around delivering and facilitating IoT. With companies like Verizon and Accenture, it is more about preparing for the future. IoT will allow Verizon to better deliver the services that they already have. Customer billing and customer experience can be improved by incorporating IoT into the ways that customers can interact with the company, but there’s also the fact that Verizon is a cellular network leader. Their consumer and business devices (i.e. smartphones) are key to incorporating IoT into daily consumer life. Wireless payments, mobile banking, home automation, and sensor interaction can be achieved through smart devices from Verizon. The talent that these companies recruit will be actively involved in designing, maintaining, and delivering IoT in the immediate future.

Although IoT hasn’t completely changed the face of Information Technology, it has created new opportunities for jobseekers in the market. Existing professionals with transferable skills will find new challenges and progression opportunities within the Iot Job Market, and also in smaller companies that are incorporating IoT concepts into manufacturing, packing, logistics, and even medical.

International Data Corporation has predicted that IoT will be a $7 trillion industry by 2020. With growth as fast as it currently is, IoT job market is the perfect platform from where jobseekers can showcase their skills, and where companies can form relationships with the talented professionals who will take them into the future.

For more information please check out our website at

www.internetofthingsrecruiting.com or contact me directly at 303-337-7871

delivering IoT forward thinking professionals IoT Delivery Consultants IoT jobseekers IoT Product Management IoT professionals IoT related jobs

Read more…

TOP 100 Industrial IoT Companies Index

Every quarter we assess more than 1,600 Industrial IoT companies and identify the 100 with the greatest impact in 

three areas: brand influence in markets, technology innovation, and ecosystem. 

Here is the list of the top 15 Industrial IoT Companies (screenshot): 

The original article can be found here

Top DSC Resources

Follow us on Twitter: @DataScienceCtrl | @AnalyticBridge

Read more…
With Digital Transformation, we are living in direct-to-customer world. 
Consumers don’t want to talk to middlemen or brokers when they need something. They also don’t want to be bombarded with irrelevant ads, nor do they want to be on the receiving end of a blanket, irrelevant marketing campaign.
Customer expectations are high, and growing! To provide a differentiating customer experience, you must exceed, or at least meet their expectations.
Almost anything you read today talks about customer engagement and customer experience. It’s not because those are the latest buzzwords, it’s because they really affects your top line. 
It is also a compliance matter now a days to know your customers well.
Customer simple expectations are Know Me, Understand me, Respect me, Listen to me, and Respond to me anytime, anyplace.
Modern customers demand intelligence from the organizations they engage with. They demand knowledge, care, and tailored content and campaigns.
Digital technology has turned customers into moving targets. Customers are hopping the channels all the day – start withsmartphone, tablet at the breakfast, continuing on mobile while commuting to work, then hoping to laptop/pc in office, and again moving to other devices when out of office and then TV, tablet, mobile at home before finishing the day. This leaves huge digital footprint for businesses to further analyze.
Today, customer data, knowledge, and insights are more valuable and of more strategic importance than ever before
Business have to adopt to various key elements to engage customers:
·  Involve customers: allow customers to engage and involve in your business goals
·  Anywhere anytime Access: give them flexibility to connect to your business from anywhere, on any device, anytime
·  Relevant content to Engage: provide the content which makes sense to customers
·  Hyper personalize: customize the content to the very personal level meeting specific needs
·  Responsiveness: quick and effective response on customer interaction
Businesses can deploy big data analytics to bring in all the advanced customer intelligence while interacting with customers:
·  Customer journey data: Collecting all the customer data across all the touch points of your business
·  Behavior data: How customers have behaved while interacting with your business
·  Sentiments data: What customers are saying about your products and services – good or bad
This helps in Knowing the customers better than the competition does, not only knowing who they are and what they have purchased, but also understanding what they want at a particular moment in time.
Amazon, Disney, Apple, Starbucks go to great lengths to exceed customer expectations by leveraging customer information and insights.
Finally knowing the customer helps you in marketing, advertising, customer service, customer retention and loyalty and above all improve the customer experience.
Knowing your customer is key to survive. Find out who they are and how you can create products that truly solve their needs

How is your organization putting efforts to know your customers in digital age?

Originally published at here.
Read more…

Bluetooth 5 & IoT - The perfect match

The global wireless connectivity market is expanding exponentially, and Bluetooth is heading back to join the IoT pack. Bluetooth 5, one of Internet of Things (IOT) mainstay technology is also set to expand. It all set to cater the growing beacon devices segment.

The update will allow for richer information broadcast, speed upgrades, and low energy usage. The low energy feature built specifically for IoT devices will support speed up to two megabits per second which means more building and home coverage. Devices can be connected even if positioned outside. Another interesting feature will be the use Bluetooth powered communication in smart cities, where the usage has been restricted till now. The mesh networking support which is touted to be present in the release can make BLE stronger for usage in tracking assets and waste management.

There is a shift from the traditional Bluetooth device and app pairing, as IoT devices move towards the wireless model. Beacons are used to send out rich data collected by smartphones for creating a rich user experience.

Bluetooth 5 supports the advertising extensions feature, which provides the continuation of permission based advertising outside regular channels. The Broadcasted data can be received within the Bluetooth device range. Visitor and asset tracking, indoor navigation can be done more easily with the improved Bluetooth features.

An example includes shops which announce real-time discounts to offer personalized deals and dynamic content to motivate participation. Bluetooth 5 also claims to reduce interference with other wireless technologies for coexisting in the global IoT environment.

Harman IoT services include gateway solutions which capture the data from devices to help business future proof their strategy and create value. As Bluetooth is expected to be featured in over 400 million IoT devices by 2020, the combination will offer a more seamless experience.

And will create new opportunities across IoT verticals giving vendors the flexibility to target multiple applications. Overall Bluetooth connections will get faster and more reliable to suit the traffic demands and integrate in IoT deployments, opening doors to huge opportunities.

 

 

 

Read more…

MWC- The Great Illusionists Show

First of all, I will explain the reason for the post title. For those who have not seen the films, I summarize: "A group of four illusionists win year after year to the public with their incredible magic shows and even mocking the FBI.

GSMA is a great illusionist and MWC is their principal magic show. We are invited year after year to visit an event with unique keynote speakers, an enormous list of exhibitors, amazing performances and a great LinkedInplace where we can meet in person some of our social media contacts. What else can we ask for?

I know that it is very ruthless to compare the GSMA with illusionists and the MWC as their greatest magic show, but at least I see quite a few reasonable resemblances, you don´t.

 My fears and my wishes for MWC17

If in 2015 I wrote " MWC 2015: Everything Connected, Tapas and Jamon", and I argued as one the reasons to attend MWC was the fact it was celebrated in Barcelona. In 2016, in my post “GSMA need to think how to reinvent MWC” I justify the reasons why the MWC needed to reinvent itself.

One thing has become clear to me after many years attending MWCs, this is the world's biggest phone and mobile networks show, with manufacturers set to unveil a raft of new phone handsets and new technology. However, the GSMA had insisted on introducing more and more distractions like Internet of Things (IoT), Connected Living, Connected Car, AR/ VR, Robots. Maybe the reason is because Telecom operators do not have the DNA to change. Still, many telecom operators take a dim view of some of the aggressive moves being made by these peers, especially when it comes to business models based on commercializing customer data.

“I expected to see less hype and a dose of common sense”

 Starting by the announcement of Spain’s Telefonica to introduce a broad plan “4th Platform” to help both consumer and business customers keep greater control over their data rather than giving it away to web giants Google, Facebook and Amazon.

 “I expected to see more applications where IoT will become a lot less exciting, but more useful and profitable. The real world.” 

But I also feel like Scott Bicheno that  “Mobile World Congress is disconnected from reality”.

 

The Top 5 tricks of illusionism this year

5G, Network Slicing and their associated Business Models

5G will undoubtedly be the next big thing in mobile wireless networks. For Niall Norton: fact, fiction, MWC – and strangers dancing in the dark, the most over-hyped technology or trend this year will be 5G in spite he thinks 5G is still miles away and therefore we have to wait for augmented reality, virtual reality, driverless cars and the like. It is a big ask for investors to keep piling money in.

For Phil Laidler, Network slicing is essentially an extension of policy control, virtualisation, NFV and SDN, and their orchestration; the move towards software-centric, flexible end-to-end networks. At MWC this year he is looking forward to seeing more "proof of concepts" for network-slicing and the associated business models, in addition to any insights into how slicing will work in practice.

Nokia’s big 5G announcement on ‘day 0’ of the event was overshadowed by a large consortium of operators and vendors calling for just the ‘new radio’ part of the 5G standard to be accelerated, despite the fact that it will lack the backhaul, cloud infrastructure, software platforms, etc needed to make the 5G dream viable. If anything highlights the wishful-thinking folly of much of the talk at this year’s show it’s that.

IoT

IoT has been a hot topic at MWC for the last few years, but, operators do not succeed with new business models beyond managed connectivity. Strategic alliances with IoT vendors has shown no results yet.

The battle between connectivity technologies remains fierce, cellular IoT Chip Battle Escalates at MWC ARM, Sequans and Altair to compete on NB-IoT solutions, but vendors and operators are now looking for more innovative ways to overcome the problem. This might just be the year of Low-Power Wide Area Networks (LPWAN).  Although LoRa and Sigfox are currently dominant in the LPWA market, cellular IoT proponents had steal the show.

For example, Telefonica - who is working on NB-IoT with Huawei - recently announced a global partnership with Sigfox. In addition, Nokia launched its worldwide IoT network grid ('WING') a few weeks ago, which it describes as "a 'one-stop-shop', full service model offering seamless IoT connectivity across technologies and geographical borders."

For Operators, the real value from IoT will be created when they can start combining data sets from different areas and different connectivity technologies. For example, smart cities, healthcare or Food & Beverage, retail, transportation and logistics to improve the cold chain supply management processes.

I hope that at MWC18 we will be looking out for examples of operators and vendors developing IoT use-cases that do just that.

“The Internet of Things is in MWC to stay for a few more years, but If your focus is Internet of Things (IoT) then your money probably will have more ROI in other IoT events”

Blockchain

Blockchain has become one of the latest buzz words in telecoms, IT and IoT , thanks to a rapid increase in start-ups using it for new use-cases beyond its original application in financial services. Despite the excitement around blockchain the technology is still poorly understood by many, so operators need to explore the practical applications of blockchain and investigate whether developing these capabilities would be beneficial and understand what will be their role telcos in this field. 

Machine learning, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robots

Not many people in the Operators and in general in the Telco sector can explain what will be the practical potential of AI and machine learning in this sector. Other industry sectors are starting to apply machine learning models to their business. And as the technology and algorithms become more refined, early adopters expect to see huge cost savings. But at what cost? 

I expect to see real use cases for AI, machine learning and Robots to make the eternal promise of Customer Experience happen.

Will Telcos someday use machine learning and AI to learn about customer’s habits so that their services and product features can emulate a human behaviour more accurately?. This is a huge opportunity for both vendors and operators.

The wandering souls network

The first time I visited MWC as CEO of OIES, that is to say, as an independent consultant, I feel like a walking dead. Without a clear agenda, without scheduled meetings. I walk through hundreds of exhibitor booths looking for friend’s faces that can spend a couple of minutes to tell them my history.

The Telco sector (Operators, Large Vendors) and the IT sector is being very cruel with employees over 45 years old. This year I have had the opportunity to spend some time with some of ex-colleagues, friends and also LinkedIn contacts that wanted to tell me their history and asked me for advice about the new “El Dorado world of IoT”. 

There is a lot of talent out there. Do not exclude this extraordinary wandering network because you believe they are overqualified and you can not manage them.

See you next year at MWC18

I've been saying the same thing for years when I come exhausted from MWC  “No more tricks, no more illusions, this has been my last year". But will be this time the real one. Do I need a sabbatical MWC?.

“Whether you passed 1 day, 3 days or a whole week of your life in the MWC17 illusionism, ask yourself: Was it worth it? “

Now you see me or not @MWC18.

 Thanks for your Comments and Likes

Read more…

Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

I recently attended Mobile World Congress (#MWC17) in Barcelona where SAP announced its collaboration with Hertz, Nokia and Concur Technologies. The purpose of this new partnership is to leverage IoT to offer an intelligent, automated experience to car users. SAP also announced its collaboration with Mojio, the connected vehicle platform and app provider for T-Mobile USA and Deutsche Telekom. The integration of Mojio’s cloud computing capabilities with SAP Vehicles Network will make parking and fueling process a breeze for users. From enabling drivers to reserve a parking spot based on calendar events to expense management for business travelers, SAP’s collaboration with these companies is likely to accelerate the development of connected cars. 

In this article, I have discussed the cases that caught my interest and that, in my opinion, are likely to progress and evolve into something revolutionary. 

Mojio — The IoT Connected Car 

Mojio ‘s new smart car technology is set to create an automotive ecosystem that will allow the automotive, insurance, and telecom industry to thrive together. The recent news that Mojio plans to connect 500,000 vehicles to its cloud platform in the first phase gives us a clue about the technology is really taking off and the idea of ‘connected cars’ is likely to become a reality soon. 

Mojio’s Data Analytics Capabilities

The open connected car platform introduced by Mojio has advanced data collection and analytical capabilities. The data collected by the sophisticated telematics device can be categorized into three types — contextual, behavioral, and diagnostic. Using mathematical and statistical modeling, Mojio discovers meaningful patterns and draw conclusions from data to allow companies to better understand the needs, behaviors, and expectations of their customers and drive product and service improvements. 

Here’s how it all works. 

  • Behavioral Data — Mojio’s telematics device gathers information about speed, steering, and braking inputs to determine driver’s fatigue level and issue alerts. Long-term driving behavior data can also be used to help the user adopt a more fuel efficient driving style and calculate risk by insurance companies. 
  • Diagnostic Data — With the ability to access vehicle’s data remotely, car manufacturers can assess the health of a vehicle and combine this capability with in-car voice communication to notify customers when service is required. 
  • Contextual Data — Led by Google and Amazon, contextual targeting of advertisements based on the search data of an individual has become a usual practice in the digital world. Mojio is using the same principle to offer more personalized advice to car drivers. It enriches the behavioral and contextual data of a customer with geolocation data, posted speed limits, and updated traffic flow conditions to provide valuable recommendations to the driver.

Data Sharing Outside the Connected Car Ecosystem 

Mojio has evolved from being a ‘service provider’ to a ‘system integrator’ and it now works with Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and other companies to offer all the services a user may need in an integrated, unfragmented manner. Built on SAP Vehicles Network, the Connected Car Ecosystem introduces users to a new level of convenience and comfort. Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, users can now ask Amazon Alexa questions about their newly connected car, such as "Alexa, ask Mojio how much fuel my car has left."

Future Possibilities: A Value Chain in Flux

Mojio has partnered with a number of companies, including Amazon Alexa, Dooing, IFTTT, FleetLeed, and Spot Angels. The integration of the value chains of these companies will mean improved convenience and better personalized services to customers. While the possibilities are unlimited, I have listed a couple of examples here to help you get an idea of the potential of this technology. 

Logistical providers — Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, you can request Amazon/UPS/DHL/FedEx to deliver an order directly to the boot of your car. Amazon will find your car using the geolocation data, enter a security code to open the luggage compartment, and leave your parcel while you’re in a meeting or having your lunch at a restaurant.

IFTTT — The integration of Mojio and IFTTT means that your calendar will be automatically updated based on your travel habits. Not only this, you will be able to set triggers and actions as well, such as:

  • When my vehicle ignition turns on, mute my Android tone. 
  • Track new trips in a Google spreadsheet. 
  • Receive a notification when Mojio senses that my car’s battery is low. 

SpotAngel — Did you know that Mojio could save you money? The partnership of Mojio with SpotAngel will allow you to receive alerts for street cleaning, alternate side parking, or parking meters, helping you avoid parking tickets. 

The possibilities are virtually unlimited. For example, if Mojio partners with a call center, then businesses will be able to get voice recordings of calls made by customers for roadside assistance or directions and use this information to ensure quality control or for CRM. 

Hertz — The Rent-a-Car Company Ready to Use IoT to Improve Its Customer Experience

Hertz is set to become the first car rental company to use the Internet of Things to offer improved services to its customers. It announced its decision to join SAP Vehicles Network in the conference that I recently attended. Being a member of the SAP Vehicles Network, that currently comprises of leading names like Nokia, Concur Technologies, and Mojio, will allow Hertz to elevate the car-rental experience of its customers by providing them personalized advice and services. 

Hertz is likely to integrate travel and itinerary planning along with in-car personalization to deliver just what the client needs. In addition to this, the integration of Concur’s TripLink will be particularly beneficial for business travelers. The app will aggregate all the travel-related expenses, including fuel and parking fees to allow customers to generate a single expense report for the entire trip. Using Concur’s TripLink business travelers will be able to a single click to submit their trip expense report immediately after the trip is completed.

Nokia to Offer Robust, Multi-Layered Security to Connected Cars

Nokia has designed a horizontal solution to address the challenges posed by the fragmented and complex IoT ecosystem that comprises of disparate devices and applications. Titled ‘Intelligent Management Platform for All Connected Things’ (IMPACT), the new solution offers connectivity, data collection, analytics, and business application development capabilities across all verticals. 

Using IMPACT, service providers will be able to assume a competitive position in the market by offering them a number of value-adding options, such as:

  • IMPACT will monitor traffic flow to offer real-time updates to customers. 
  • Personalization of driver settings and entertainment systems. 
  • Remote monitoring of speed, fuel levels, and other metrics for vehicle diagnostics and predictive maintenance. 

Improved Safety with Live Transportation Monitoring 

Apart from Nokia, Hertz, and Mojio, SAP is also working with NTT to devise a state-of-the-art solution that can improve the safety of public transport. The solution, which is called Live Transportation Monitoring, has three components — NTT’s IoT analytics platform, SAP’s connected transportation safety portal, and hitoe® — a fabric that will used to manufacture drivers’ workwear. 

This fabric is coated with a conductive polymer which will help the service provider monitor the driving behavior and key health parameters of drivers from a remote location in a real time manner. The data will be presented on SAP’s connected transportation safety portal (as exhibited in the photo below). This way, public transportation companies will be able to ensure complete safety of their passengers, as well monitor the health of their employees and vehicles. 

Combined, all these technologies have the potential to make the driving experience of customers sager, more convenient, and less costly. Also, since this is a relatively new market, we can expect new players to join hands, gain a foothold, and push the boundaries of what’s possible with IoT.

What do you think of these new developments? Don’t forget to like the article, share your comments and insights. 

If you would like to read Ronald van Loon future posts then please click 'Follow' and feel free to also connect on LinkedIn and Twitter

This post originally appeared here.

Read more…

Could it Be LTE? Identifying a Standard for the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) a buzzworthy phrase that has caught on and at first it seemed just that – talk. Now we’re in a position where we have smart lightbulbs, virtual assistants, self-regulating home heating and cooling systems…and the ‘things’ that make up the IoT are becoming more self-aware (if you believe in the Terminator approach). It’s proving far closer to reality than anyone previously thought. 

For this reality there are far-reaching implications when it comes to the applicability of IoT technology as it impacts every major industry – from automotive and finance, to energy and retail. But with each application comes another challenge, how do we define a standard that forms an ecosystem allowing all IoT solutions to work seamlessly and in each industry and application in the manner they were meant to?

We face a real problem when it comes to the exciting buzzworthy acronym of IoT. Yet with no central IoT standards or real oversight over development, the nearly five billion smart devices Gartner estimates will be in use by the end of this year are spread across a dizzying array of standards and protocols. IoT requires extensive technology to work – from wireless communications, to data security, to interoperability with other devices – so it’s a daunting task to apply a single standard to a device (much less the integration of the entire IoT ecosystem!). 

Start by Looking at the DNA of IoT

Let’s first break down IoT to its three core components to frame up the challenges with an IoT standard. I like to call them the DNA of IoT:

  • Devices - the connected ‘things’ that relay data to/from each other
  • Network - the internet, which provides the medium for these devices to communicate
  • Applications - the ‘enablers’ that direct workloads for predicted outcomes

In line with the overall IT industry, the majority of the value derived is designed and delivered at the software application layer, which means this is where most of the innovations and profits lie. On the other hand, you also have the underlying (network) hardware and devices, which are things like sensors, servers, routers, transmitters and personal devices. And while there’s no disputing that the latter are all vital components, they’re continuously commoditized with similar features in an endless but all too familiar race to the bottom of the market. There’s also no single body or organization regulating the manufacturing industry, so they aren’t building next generation solutions in a manner that complies with any security or IoT standards.

Why is this important? Because it highlights the different priorities and levels of innovation within the IoT ecosystem.

The Case for LTE: the Missing Link

So now that all of the IoT problems are out in the open, let’s get to a solution. There are a number of technologies to potentially standardize on – everything from WiFi and Zigbee, to LPWAN and Cellular. However, I believe there’s one that provides the most practical approach with the lowest barriers and fastest time to market: Long-Term Evolution (LTE).

LTE is the most prevalent wireless network option in the US today and providers are already in the process of building out specific bands within LTE to better service IoT devices. This means that new IoT devices can be on-boarded to an LTE network as quickly as they are developed, which provides the needed flexibility to accommodate IoT devices regardless of type or industry.

On top of that, by being built on a solid foundation of widely-available LTE, IoT devices also benefit from reduced device and network complexity, increased coverage for hard-to-reach IoT devices, multi-year battery life with power save modes and efficient signaling, as well as higher node density. And as wide-area IoT deployments pick-up, these new standards provide coexistence and compatibility with current LTE services, global scalability, increased quality of service, and end-to-end security and authentication features.

So regardless of how you view, use, or define IoT, the net-net is that there needs to be an ongoing conversation about truly setting a standard and my bet is on LTE. It’s already becoming widely adopted and offers the most resiliency and efficiency when it comes to the IoT - so I say, let’s party on.

Read more…

IoT Central Digest, March 6, 2017

We cover a lot of ground in this issue of the IoT Central Digest. Edge, fog, and cloud computing are all touched on by new and returning contributors. We also look at security and blockchain, as well as explore IoT use cases with Visa, Airbus, Bosch and SNCF. 

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT Architecture at the Edge

This article aims to focus on edge side of IoT Architectures where all things are. The edge is the place where all event data are generated and automated actions occurs, and because that it must be managed and secured. It also includes a wide array of sensors, actuators, and devices which interact and communicate real-time data each other and with cloud services.

Mobile World Congress and the Pain in Spain

Posted by David Oro

As Mobile World Congress kicks off in Barcelona this week, Avast, a security company, has a warning for the citizens of Spain: There are over 5 million vulnerable IoT devices across the country.

The Era of Machine Learning (ML), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robotics and Internet of Things (IoT) is Here.


Network Error: Challenges to IoT Adoption in Southeast Asia


Follow us on Twitter | Join our LinkedIn group | Members Only | For Bloggers | Subscribe
Read more…

The IoT Architecture at the Edge

 

This article aims to focus on edge side of IoT Architectures where all things are. The edge is the place where all event data are generated and automated actions occurs, and because that it must be managed and secured. It also includes a wide array of sensors, actuators, and devices which interact and communicate real-time data each other and with cloud services.

Another aspect is as IoT grows ever larger, some capabilities such as data analysis and decision-making will have to localize, it means is shifting from the cloud to the edge. 

Let’s see the big picture below to understand the main components of this architecture.

 

The diagram above shows the edge side and cloud side. In the edge side the things could be sensors, actuators, devices and a crucial thing called gateway. This gateway has the responsibility to establish communications between things and cloud services and also orchestrate the actions between the things.

The cloud side will not be covered on the this article (it will be subject on next article), but the IoT communication protocols between things and cloud services will be covered. Let’s explore each architectural component of this big picture.

 

The Edge

 

The term edge come from [1] Edge Computing where data are processed at the periphery of the network, as close to the originating data as possible. The edge can be a manufacturing floor, smart city, smart building, energy grid, oil rig, wind farm, dairy farm, planes, trains or automobiles

The key factor which makes the edge processing crucial is turn the data processing and action taking the most close to real-time. We could use as example a “smart car” which its environment is a kind of edge where a lot of sensors are generating all kind of data. Imagine one engine sensor is emitting overheating events, and based on this event, an engine actuator must take action to slow down the engine in order to prevent more overheating.

As we can see on this example, all event data generation, data analysis and taking action occurs at the edge. Of course, the edge architecture must provide cloud integration where in the fact full big data analytics can be applied.

 

Sensors

 

Everything that lives in the edge are things, one of most common thing is called sensors. According with the book [2] Foundational Elements of an IoT Solution, sensors read and report on the real-world status of connected products, machines, and local environments. They are the eyes and ears of the system, monitoring environmental elements like temperature, light, and moisture. Ongoing sensor innovation, an often-overlooked area of IoT technology, will be critical for evolving and improving solutions.

While we might think of sensors only as physical objects, anything that can be read, from files to product-specific data, can and should be considered sensor input. For example, a piece of industrial equipment may have hundreds of data points unique to that product, and every one of them could be considered a sensor. Examples of sensors include 

  • Temperature sensors

  • Light sensors

  • Moisture sensors

  • GPS receivers

  • Vehicle on-board diagnostics

 

Actuators

There are other common edge thing which is called actuators. Them usually affect the electromechanical or logical state of a product or environment. They are the system’s hands and feet. Actuators might include a light that can be turned on and off, or a valve that can be opened and closed. Commonly actuators offers a set of APIs for its interaction.

System commands sent to embedded applications—such as remote reboot, configuration updates, and firmware distribution—should also be considered actuation because, by changing its software, the system is in fact changing the physical reality of a product. Examples of actuators include:

  • Lights

  • Valves

  • Motors

  • Commands (“soft” actions, file distribution, firmware updates)

 

Smart Devices

Also, there are the devices living on the edge which is usually called as smart devices, the most commons are:

  • Mobile devices such as smartphones or tablet computers

  • Microcontroller units (MCUs) like Arduino devices

  • Single-board computers like Raspberry Pi devices.

 

Appliances

At least, there are appliances (or gadgets) used in smart environments. They usually have a defined function, and can be controlled by human user interface. The example are:

  • Smart thermostats like Nest Thermostats

  • Smart lighting systems like Philips Hue.

 

IoT Smart Gateway

 

Captura de tela de 2017-03-02 14-18-20.png

 

As illustrated in the diagram above, the key component of Edge IoT Architecture is what we call as Smart Gateway. This component is based on traditional IoT Gateway which the main responsibilities is act as a proxy between the world of field things and the enterprise data center, usually cloud based.

A main capability of IoT Gateway is enabling communication from the Edge to the Cloud. It means it must understand field protocols and convert it to cloud protocols. Later on this article, we will explore all theses protocols.

Another IoT Gateway feature is routing data to cloud based on simple rules. For example, a engine sensor emits temperature status each second but it is not relevant for an analytic application based on cloud which will process each minute gap. This kind of rule can be deployed in IoT Gateway to send the event to the cloud in every minute aggregation.

The concept of Smart Gateway comes from adding smart capabilities to traditional IoT Gateway which comes with basic features. Let’s explore each smart capability below.

 

Field Protocols

 

Since sensors, actuators and devices are living at the edge, they must communicate each other and also with Smart Gateway. This kind of communication are based on field protocols, the most commons protocols are:

  • Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE): The new Bluetooth Low-Energy (BLE) – or Bluetooth Smart, as it is now branded – is a significant protocol for IoT applications. Importantly, while it offers similar range to Bluetooth it has been designed to offer significantly reduced power consumption.

  • Zigbee: Like Bluetooth, has a large installed base of operation, although perhaps traditionally more in industrial settings. ZigBee PRO and ZigBee Remote Control (RF4CE), among other available ZigBee profiles, are based on the IEEE802.15.4 protocol, which is an industry-standard wireless networking technology operating at 2.4GHz targeting applications that require relatively infrequent data exchanges at low data-rates over a restricted area and within a 100m range such as in a home or building

  • Wifi: This type of connectivity is often an obvious choice for many developers, especially given the pervasiveness of WiFi within the home environment within LANs. It requires little further explanation except to state the obvious that clearly there is a wide existing infrastructure as well as offering fast data transfer and the ability to handle high quantities of data.

  • NFC: Near Field Communication (NFC) is a technology that enables simple and safe two-way interactions between electronic devices, and especially applicable for smartphones, allowing consumers to perform contactless payment transactions, access digital content and connect electronic devices. Essentially it extends the capability of contactless card technology and enables devices to share information at a distance that is less than 4cm.

 

Further information about those and others field protocols, check it out about [4] IoT Protocols.  

Cloud Protocols

 

The most of IoT solutions, even those ones live almost entirely on the edge need to integrate with cloud services or other IoT solution based on cloud. Since it is a requirement, we need to communicate using a cloud protocol as listed below:

  • MQTT: Message Queue Telemetry Transport (MQTT) was introduced by IBM in 1999 and standardized by OASIS in 2013 . It is designed to provide embedded connectivity between applications and middlewares on one side and networks and communications on the other side. It follows a publish/subscribe architecture, where the system consists of three main components: publishers, subscribers, and a broker.

  • AMQP: The Advanced Message Queuing Protocol (AMQP) is a protocol that was designed for financial industry. It runs over TCP and provides a publish/ subscribe architecture which is similar to that of MQTT. The difference is that the broker is divided into two main components: exchange and queues. The exchange is responsible for receiving publisher messages and distributing them to queues based on pre-defined roles and conditions. Queues basically represent the topics and subscribed by subscribers which will get the sensory data whenever they are available in the queue.

  • CoAP: The Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) is another session layer protocol designed by IETF Constrained RESTful Environment (Core) working group to provide lightweight RESTful (HTTP) interface. Representational State Transfer (REST) is the standard interface between HTTP client and servers. However, for lightweight applications such as IoT, REST could result in significant overhead and power consumption. CoAP is designed to enable low-power sensors to use RESTful services while meeting their power constraints. It is built over UDP, instead of TCP commonly used in HTTP and has a light mechanism to provide reliability. CoAP architecture is divided into two main sublayers: messaging and request/response. The messaging sublayer is responsible for reliability and duplication of messages while the request/response sublayer is responsible for communication. As in HTTP, CoAP utilizes GET, PUT, PUSH, DELETE messages requests to retrieve, create, update, and delete, respectively.

  • HTTP: This is the standard protocol for web services and still will be used in IoT solutions, the overhead of this protocol is well know but we will continue use this protocol in some case when latency and bandwidth are not issues. We need also consider HTTP/2, other protocols such as Google Protobuf and even CoAP which are based on HTTP. The most popular architectural style called RESTFul is widely used on mobile and web application and must be considered on IoT Solutions.

 

Continue reading about [6] Internet of Things Protocols and Standards.

Smart Gateway Architecture and Capabilities

Runtime Capabilities 

The first capability to explore is called dataflow, this feature is the entry point which receive data from the things. It performs as inbound connector ingesting event sensor data using the field protocols as mentioned before, therefore must understand sensor’s protocols. Once data is received it begins an workflow which could apply some function like cleansing, transformation, composition or aggregation. Eventually, it should compose some command to be send back to the things. 

Dataflow also must implements security constraints like thing/device authentication and prevent overload data attack. After entire dataflow was performed, it should start a routing flow, which some rules should be performed such as:

  • Data routing or send commands to the things using field protocols

  • Persisting data to storage system

  • Routing aggregated data to the cloud using cloud protocols (to be explained later in this article)

 

An example of dataflow and routing working together is a building temperature sensor emits each minute temperature data which is received by a Bluetooth connector and dispatched to dataflow. This data is analyzed by a function which contains a rule that implies the building air conditioning must be turned on, so the dataflow call a routing rule to send the command to air conditioning via ZigBee protocol. Also, the incident must reported to analytics system in the cloud, it means the dataflow must call a routing rule to call the analytics API hosted in cloud.

The storage system is responsible to store all configuration and runtime data. It means all persistent configuration data used by dataflow or routing flow is organized in databases. Also tracing and logging data is persisted here and it used to composite analytic data used by analytics and monitoring features which will be explained late. It is important to say that storage system has rules to decide if the data at a given stage of processing should be temporary, persistent, or kept in-memory.

 

Operational Capabilities

The first operational feature is near real-time analytics which provide a set of analytics dashboards for low latency real-time monitoring and close to the devices without need to send all data to cloud to remote processing. This kind of feature is crucial because the IoT applications will be built on systems that can make intelligent decisions for operations on a moment’s notice. For example, real-time anomaly detection can help manufacturers adjust robots and equipment to optimize yield or identify potential defects as early as possible so affected units can be removed from the assembly line for rework. Read more about [5] Low Latency, Real-time Analytics at the Edge

Other crucial capability is the reactive monitoring feature, different from analytics which is passive, this feature should be reactive. It means when some event ou alert occurs some action should be take, it could be send an alert email or send a command to an specific device. This kind of feature also should offer a documented API to Monitoring Solutions easily use these APIs.

Finally, the platform needs a configuration console feature where operational and development teams should use to interact with the platform. In others words it means all capabilities listed above are accessed and configured by single user interface.

 

Summary

 

In fact, we believe which robust IoT architecture should consider the edge side must have strong capabilities. Some of capabilities such as analytics today run on cloud side but we need provide these features close to the things 

We also believe in concept of smart gateway brings these strong capabilities to the edge and brings some independence from the cloud. The main capabilities should include protocols to communicate to the things and even cloud, it also must provide bidirectional data and command flow and finally, in the core of platform, the runtime and operational capabilities.

In short, our insight is push smart capabilities to the edge in order to achieve near real-time reactive IoT solutions turning it faster and cloud independent.

References

 

[1] Edge computing - http://searchdatacenter.techtarget.com/definition/edge-computing

[2] Foundational Elements of an IoT Solution, Chapter 3 - https://www.oreilly.com/ideas/the-edge-of-the-iot

[3] The Architecture of IoT Gateways - https://dzone.com/articles/iot-gateways-and-architecture

[4] IoT Protocols - https://www.rs-online.com/designspark/eleven-internet-of-things-iot-protocols-you-need-to-know-about

[5] Low Latency, Real-time Analytics at the Edge - https://foghorn-systems.com/low-latency-real-time-analytics-edge-biggest-advantage-industrial-internet-things/

[6] Internet of Things Protocols and Standards -

http://www.cse.wustl.edu/~jain/cse570-15/ftp/iot_prot/

See the original post here.

Read more…

Upcoming IoT Events

6 things to avoid in transactional emails

transactional man typing

  You might think that once a sale has been made, or an email subscription confirmed, that your job is done. You’ve made the virtual handshake, you can have a well-earned coffee and sit down now right? Wrong! (You knew we were…

Continue

More IoT News

IoT Career Opportunities