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IoT and Agriculture Industry

IoT (Internet of Things) is everywhere; there is not a single industry left which is untouched by the magic of Internet of Things. After smart fitness, smart entertainment, smart corporate world, it is the turn for smart farming to make a substantial difference in the life of farmers and how the traditional farming is done. The agriculture industry is going to the be one of the most important industries in coming future due to the rising population worldwide and it is only right that innovation in farming is not taken lightly. There have been a few groundbreaking inventions in the past that has helped agriculture industry but with the invention of IoT technologies, the face of the agriculture industry is going to change forever.

Smart and high-tech equipment to help farmers remotely monitor the crops are already in existence. Large and small farms can, with the help of IoT technology, monitor various factors involved in optimum productivity. Moisture and nutrition of soil, the growth of the crop, rainfall, and pest infestation are some very valuable information and can be used by farms to ensure the high productivity and to improve farming techniques.

The real-time analysis of the data collected by IoT sensors can prove to be extremely beneficial for future yields. Also, this data collected about climate can be used to create the indoor farming environment (Indoor farming is steadily picking up because of the increasing shortage of the land available for farming). Indoor farming with the help of IoT technology can be a thing for the future.

Whatever the industry, the importance of IoT technology cannot be underestimated. If not so popular, industries like agriculture are going to be dependent on IoT imagine the impact of IoT in popular industries. If there is any doubt in your mind about the future, it should now be clear. The future is IoT and there cannot be a better time for you to get involved in the industry (IoT industry – estimated to be a trillion dollar industry in next couple of years) right now. IoT training, for various levels, provided by Collabera TACT is one of the best training available in the country and this training will put you on the path to a successful career in IoT.

This article originally appeared here.

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If you need more information about IoT courses or any other course offered by Collabera TACT, please drop a line to [email protected]

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A Fresh Approach to Remote IoT Connectivity

The IoT market has changed in many ways throughout the years, and since it’s a growing industry, there’s an estimated 32.6% CAGR increase in the next five years.

 

As an industry predicted to spend trillions in solutions, IoT’s trends need to be carefully observed and examined in order for implications and applications to be future-proofed.

 

How do you go about doing this? By simply analyzing how IoT is being used, as well as identifying which sectors are showing potential growth. Right now, a lot of focus is given to consumer applications such as Amazon’s dash buttons and smart home appliances. However, there are many opportunities in remote IoT. This covers industries like industrial, transportation, healthcare, etc.

 

One challenge that needs to be dealt with is how connectivity is approached right now. As more IoT and M2M devices would be deployed in rural areas and places with limited connectivity, applications and machines would need an improved infrastructure in order to carry out their purpose in areas with little connectivity.

 

Additionally, the increase of transportation and emergency-related applications would require not only ways to deals with low connectivity but also call for a system that can access multiple networks depending on availability and location.

 

Another challenge is how current devices will handle the developments in IoT and M2M technologies in the next five years. The 2G sunset is just one-way communication companies are affecting the industry.

 

Don’t fret, though, as there are several ways to resolve this and many opportunities left to explore to get ready for IoT’s evolution in the coming years.

 

Want to learn more about the possibilities remote IoT connectivity presents and how you can prepare for them? Check out the following infographic from Communications Solutions Company, Podsystem, and start future-proofing your IoT and M2M applications.

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IoT - The Revolution Started

THE SMART CITY: HOW OUR COLLECTIVE LIVES ARE BECOMING TECHNOLOGICALLY INTERCONNECTED. 

The smart city is still a work in progress both when it comes to defining exactly what we mean by the term as well as its implementation.

At the highest level, a smart city is one in which various ‘public goods’ the city provides to its citizens become interconnected. This relates generally to the use and dissemination of energy, the transportation system, the infrastructure, and the healthcare systems. Though the details are still being hammered out, some analysts are already predicting that the Smart City is a $1.5 Trillion market opportunity.

Let’s start with an obvious example, our ability to get an Uber or a Lyft with the touch of a button. The ride-sharing industry helps decrease the number of cars on the road and as such help reduce gas emission levels. Ridesharing is the most well-known example of an IoT invention wherein our smartphones connect us to a service, on the go, by using the geolocation function of our mobile devices.

If we just scratch beneath the surface of smart city IoT innovations, we discover so much more….

Notably, the issue of sensors that are being installed on street lights and traffic signals (Amsterdam is one city which has implemented this at scale). Rather than keeping the street lights on throughout the night, wasting energy, all street lights are interconnected and turn on as they detect movement on the streets. The mass adoption of this technology alone could save cities billions of dollars in energy bills.

And there is another sensor based IoT invention that has been around for a while now; every time I visit the Fashion Outlet Mall in Chicago, as soon as I enter the parking lot, I see small screens informing me how many parking spaces are available on each floor of the parking lot. The entire complex has small sensors installed near each parking space and as a car is parked in a spot it sends a signal which updates the count of available parking spaces for each floor.

Imagine being able to optimize and monitor the delivery of water to every household in a city and automatically inform the authorities when an issue requires attention. Or reflect on the Smart Meters that ComEd has been installing all over the nation so that there’s no need to estimate the electrical bill of each customer every month or send technicians to collect meter reads. Expect to see more and more innovations in this field because cities and private companies alike are desperate to reduce their operational costs.

Source: https://ymedialabs.com/

Post was originally published here.

 

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A few years ago, the idea of a “Telco in a Box” was very usual among the Telecommunication industry. Basically, it was a pre-integrated, turnkey real-time billing and customer care solution that enabled communications service providers (CSPs) to accelerate their growth strategies and increase profitability.

Companies like Accenture, Oracle, Redknee or Tech Mahindra used this concept addressed to Mobile Virtual Network Operators or MVNOs, Tier 3 Operators and Tier 1 sub brands. The benefits of this solution were clear:

  • A low-risk, quick to launch turnkey solution
  • Go to market faster than competitors

It was a matter of time that this marketing slogan reached the Internet of Things (IoT). And so it has been, at the moment with little noise, but it is certain that we will see much more "IoT in a Box" in the next months.

What is IoT in a Box and What's in the box

Today we could say that IoT in a Box is:

  • A pre-configured, fully integrated, enterprise-enabled IoT bundle optimized for IoT processing (Telco view)
  • All the required building blocks to develop a wireless IoT system (IoT Vendor view)

In the first case, the IoT in a Box must include some of the following components depending of the application:

  • ·         Hardware / Hardware as a Service
    • ·         1 o more battery powered modules with sensors for monitoring for instance temperature, humidity, geo-location, movement, vibration, battery level or signal strength
    • ·         1 or more Relay switch or actuators
    • ·         1 GSM chip (SIM) per module with a data plan
    • ·         IoT gateway
  • ·         Software / Software as a Service
    • ·         Device management
    • ·         Enterprise database with storage plan
    • ·         Security Connectivity
    • ·         Pre-configured dashboards
    • ·         Pre-configured thresholds and alerts
    • ·         Mobile app
  • ·         Services / Services as a Service
    • ·         Professional Services (optional)
    • ·         Support (basic included, premium optional)

When you receive your IoT in a Box.  All you must do is:

  1. charge your modules
  2. place them on (or in) things,
  3. login to your own org to name your modules, and then
  4. turn on your modules. As soon as you activate a module, it starts to send sensor data, and you can start monitoring your things in near-time - online or using the mobile app.

“The concept behind a basic “IoT in a box” is that It takes you less than 1 hour to set up your own IoT system.”

In the second case, the IoT in a Box must include a Development Kit and all required building blocks to develop a wireless IoT system. We will see some examples later.

What if I want to expand the capabilities of my IoT application?

Although IoT in a Box is aimed at solving a simple business need, in certain scenarios or industries it may be necessary to extend the capabilities included in the Box. In this regard, vendors must provide accessories, expansion modules, I/Os and peripherals, Multi-standard connectivity options  and additional Pre-configured dashboards and alerts depending of the industry and application.

Selling IoT in a Box

When I wrote Welcome to the first “Selling IoT” Master Class!, I did not emphasize in selling IoT to Small and Medium Business (SMB) and Consumer market.  Precisely, the main objective that vendors pursue with the “IoT in a box” is increase sales in SMB market. This is a huge market and vendors need a way to escalate by channel partners, but as I do not consider myself an expert selling to SMB, so I look forward for your advices.

Is IoT in a Box already in the market?

Due to confidentiality agreements, I cannot include info from different vendors that will be selling IoT in a Box very soon.  But we can find already some examples of IoT in a Box in the market. See below some of them based on public information.

T- Mobile IoT in a Box - With the T-Mobile IoT Box, you can realize your individual M2M application without great effort. Connect your devices and sensors and transfer the obtained data to a cloud system via mobile radio. A data interface provides processing and integration information to other systems, websites, or apps. The T-Mobile IoT Box consists of a developer board with an integrated M2M SIM card, several inputs / outputs and Bluetooth smart interface, an online portal and a RESTful API.

T-Mobile US – IoT promotion for device makers - Building on its movement into the internet of things (IoT) market, T-Mobile US announced a new IoT-specific pricing model as part of a promotion that includes a free Cat1 LTE module along with data services.

T-Mobile US, SVP Doug Chartier said: “The wireless industry needs simpler options for IoT to take off, and that’s exactly what we’re delivering.”

Telia M2M in a Box - M2M technology easy and affordable for any business. Telia M2M in a Box gives you a set of hardware with sensors providing you with real time information about position, movement and climate, which you can monitor directly in the web portal. A versatile and user-friendly measurement tool to observe, monitor and protect your business remotely.

Capgemini IoT-in-a-Box is a rapid, low-cost, low-risk, method to pilot IoT strategy to test and define business cases and provides a pre-configured, enterprise-ready IoT system for monitoring up to 25 devices. It simplifies the task of aligning integrating and configuring all IoT components to provide rapid time to value.

IBM - The Intelligent Building – IoT Starter Kit (Enterprise Edition) is an out–of-the-box IoT solution for Intelligent Buildings. The kit provides seamless integration of the EnOcean Smart Gateway with the Watson IoT Platform.

Relayr- Relayr -Industrial Grade Starter Kit for IoT Acceleration powered by relayr, Intel, Dell and Bosch.

Microsoft – Solair IoT in a Box was an IoT plug&play kit to connect things, sensors, machines to a gateway and then, in a few clicks, instantly visualize data on the Solair application. After acquisition of Solair probably Microsoft had discontinued this offer.

Bosch - Bosch IoT Starter kits that come with pre-configured XDK devices + cloud connectivity. It is as out of the box as it could be!

HPE - HPE Uncorks IoT In A Box - Called (at least by Hewlett Packard Enterprise) the ‘industry’s first converged systems for the IoT’, the Edgeline EL1000 and Edgeline EL4000 systems ‘integrate data capture, control, compute and storage to deliver heavy-duty analytics and insights at the edge to enable real-time decision making.’

Electric Imp - IoT QuickStart by Electric Imp - Electric Imp’s IoT QuickStart Family is designed to help you cut the time to build, test and prototype complex IoT solutions all while maintaining industrial-strength security, scalability and control. Based on reference designs that Electric Imp experts have developed over the past five years, the IoT QuickStart Family appliances represent the most frequently requested secure connectivity and device prototype solutions, each delivered in a fraction of the time and cost required by custom-built solutions.

Creator Ci40 IoT Developer Kit - The Creator Ci40 board is a high-performance, low-power microcomputer that packs a cXT200 chip based on a subsystem optimized by us specifically for IoT applications. The cXT200 SoC includes a dual-core, dual-threaded MIPS CPU clocked at 550 MHz and an Ensigma connectivity engine that covers super-fast 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO Wi-Fi and low-power Bluetooth/Bluetooth low energy (Classic and Smart). See also: Imagination Launches ‘IoT In A Box’ Kickstarter - and Build a home IoT irrigation system with 'IoT-in-a-box' kit .

Nextcloud Box – a private cloud and IoT solution for home users – from Nextcloud, Canonical and WDLabs. Nextcloud Box makes hosting a personal cloud simple and cost effective whilst maintaining a secure private environment that can be expanded with additional features via apps. The Nextcloud Box consists of a hard drive and a case, complemented by a Raspberry Pi 2 or a similar credit-card sized computer. The pre-configured, easy-to-use platform handles file storage and syncing, communication and more, requires no maintenance and enables users to install more functionality through apps like Spreed, OpenHab and Collabora Online. The box offers 1TB of storage at the price point of Eur 70. For information on where to buy please visit nextcloud.com/box.

WIKON – My M2M BOX – Our special expertise lies in the compliance with industrial standards for our product developments and the development of powerful embedded hardware and software. Special developments for explosion zones, adverse environmental conditions, IP-68 standards and extended temperature ranges are frequently in demand.

Mobica collaborates with Advantech to develop a complete IoT Solution - Mobica, a Silver member of Oracle Partner Network (OPN) and global provider of a leading-edge software engineering, testing and consultancy services, developed a solution which aggregates data from a variety of sensors and sends it to the Oracle Internet of Things Cloud Service for analysis and integration. Mobica used an Advantech UTX-3115 IoT gateway and a M2.COM based WISE-1520 Low-Power Wi-Fi IoT node for sensor input.

The ThingBox Project - Use Internet of Things technologies without any technical knowledge and for free.

Eight best IoT starter kits: The best internet of things developer kits –

Imagination Meluncurkan kit IoT –“IoT http://misteriotcom/2015/11/24/imagination-meluncurkan-kit-iot-iot-in-a-box/

There are many IoT Vendors who offer Devices, IoT platform, Apps and Services bundled with the same purpose of IoT in a Box, democratize the IoT.

IoT in a Box and IoT Marketplaces

As we know “IoT is not only about connecting things, neither controlling things”, it is about the Things become more intelligent and therefore companies could offer new services under new business models. I believe that IoT marketplaces will play a key role in the evolution of IoT in a box. We have already some examples:

Libelium, the IoT Marketplace is a one stop click-and-buy online store. The company is helping frustrated companies with pre-integrated solutions from choosing the right hardware, cloud components to application.

Telus IoT Marketplace – Connect the things that matter to your business by leveraging connected devices provided by their partner network.

ThingWorks Marketplace – gives easy access to everything you need to build and run your ThingWorx based IoT application. All components listed on the ThingWorx Marketplace are customized, tested and guaranteed to work with the ThingWorx platform.

Intel IoT marketplace – Coming soon.

“IoT in a Box solutions that encompass infrastructure, networking, analytics, service enablement and monetization to connect devices, expose data, services and processes to applications, consumers and machines will be the foundation for IoT marketplaces”.

IoT Service in a Box, the logical evolution of IoT in a Box 

I believe that the logical evolution of IoT in a Box will be IoT Service in a Box sold through IoT marketplaces. It is a matter of time that we will see:

  • ·         Predictive Maintenance in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Loss Prevention in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Asset Location in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Predictive Intrusion in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Vending Machine Product Recommendation in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Real time micro-Inventory in a Box as a Service
  • ·         Customer Emotion in a Box as a Service
  • ·         ……  Your imagination is the limit

 

 

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What will this market bring us in the next few years? Are there reasons for optimism?

During the last three years, I have had the opportunity to discover, know and analyse more than 50 Spanish companies in the exciting sector of the Internet of Things (IoT).

Some of these companies are globally recognized as pioneers of IoT. Others less known but very innovative, with great talent in their ranks. All of them have been weathering the storm and far from being discouraged, because the reality is being tougher than all the hype announced by analysts, are more excited than ever before future expectations.

As I wrote in my post “5 PROVERBS TO SAVE MY STARTUP”, nobody is a prophet in their land, but even so, I can not resist providing a few tips that I believe can help us use IoT as an enabler that drives the ICT sector. Would not it be fantastic if we finally met our desire to have a strong, dynamic, competitive and innovative ICT sector in our society?

Accept reality

And the stark reality is: "Spain is not a technological country, it is a service country". I think that the lapidary expression of Miguel de Unamuno, that “they invent it”, also applies to the IoT. But it is one thing not to invent and another is to become sellers of products, solutions or services of multinationals by all known.

We must use our ingenuity, talent, creativity, and customer orientation to design and develop quality, easy-to-use global IoT solutions.

If we are good sellers of foreign products, the language should be the problem. Our objective market should not be our City, our Community or our Country, our market must be the world.

Focus, Focus and Focus

I have insisted on many forums that in Spain we can not do everything on IoT. For example, we can be leaders in Smart Cities, but we will have little chance of success in Connected Cars, we must fight to find a gap in Industry 4.0 (also known as Industrial Internet or IIOT) but I fear we will not be number 1 in Wearables, although we could be innovative in Health services.

We must analyse our strengths and weaknesses to recognize where our opportunities are and what our threats are. Let us be references in our focus areas.

Trusted Ecosystems

We know that there is not a single company in the world that can do everything in IoT, much less leading the IoT, so it is obvious that our companies and Startups have no other choice than to create or be part of reliable ecosystems and Collaborative projects in the focus areas to meet the challenges posed by IoT projects.

We must design new sustainable business models with our local partners, it is time to trust if we want to survive in this competitive and fragmented sector until the magic 2020.

It's time to real collaboration, put a logo on our presentations and our website is absurd if there is something else behind.

Specialization

Given the size of IoT Spanish companies it is not possible to do everything and get it right.

We must specialize, whether manufacturing specific hardware, developing software or offering services in our focus areas.

Scalability

To succeed in IoT, Spanish companies must be able to offer global and scalable solutions. We will need startup talent to focus on companies of a larger size than without giving up innovation and agility, being able to cope with large national and international IoT projects.

Expect to be outsourced by other subcontractors of a company that works for an end customer is not acceptable if we really want to change. It is a pending subject of our business model not only in technology, it is a deep-seated problem of corporate culture.

We should be able to have at least one unicorn in IoT. And I'm not talking about Telefonica, Banco Santander, BBVA, Iberdrola, Inditex, ACS, Ferrovial or Indra, but a company that provides a new IoTaaS model based on our strengths (which all or almost all know) Services and HW / SW IoT products from Spanish manufacturers. That is, we must think about having our Uber, Airbnb or why not our Spanish Tesla.

We must look for concentration of companies in the focus areas to achieve the size that allows the scalability that the IoT business needs.

Invest in Education and Training

The IoT is complex, although many try to make it simple. We will need many types of profiles and not just theoretical knowledge.

It is vital at both, the private and public levels, that the Public Administrations and Companies dedicate funds to continuously educate students and train employees in the IoT technologies.

 “Investing now in IoT training will be key to ensuring a sustainable future for our companies, our country and our professionals.”

 Start Now

This advice goes to both Enterprises and Public Administrations.

In the case of Enterprises, it would be highly desirable to lose for once the fear of being the first to implement technology solutions. You must consider IoT a key element in the digitization process of your company.

Public Administrations, stop using your budgets as always, and think about investing in a more sustainable, intelligent and connected citizen.

To conclude, pulling on the proverb I think:

"We have the wicker, so we must have confidence that we can make a great basket in IoT".

You can read the Spanish version here.

Thanks in advance for your Likes and Shares

Thoughts ? Comments ?

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What is Going on with Residential IoT

Cyber Security?

For sure you have heard about the recent DDoS attacks that occurred last October 21st on Dyn’s DNS service. The news broke out reporting that many well-known Internet services were not available. According to Hacker News Twitter, Etsy, Spotify and other sites were affected. Up to this point, there’s nothing new, just another DDoS attack. Large company outage means big news, but there is still a point that is key in this equation and that has not been addressed. 

  • Was Residential or Consumer IoT affected?

According to Dyn’s report, “the attack come from 100,000 malicious endpoints”. 

On the second last paragraph they quote: “Not only has it highlighted vulnerabilities in the security of “Internet of Things” (IOT) devices that need to be addressed, but it has also sparked further dialogue in the internet infrastructure community about the future of the internet.

Put both quotes together: 100,000 IoT devices have been Hacked. This is astonishing and outstanding!

There has been no news about how the 100,000 IoT device customers have been affected or supported:

  • Do they still have the Bot inside their device? 
  • Do the devices work correctly? 
  • Do they know they have been hacked? 
  • Do they know they are at risk? 
  • Will the Bots change and do other things? 
  • Will the Bots leave backdoors in their home networks?
  • How long will it take for another Bot to hack their IoT device?
  • What are Consumer Protection Agencies doing about this?
  • What are Governments doing?

This is no joke, we are talking about 100,000 devices (IoT Customers), and therefore, has to be addressed very seriously.

Dyn and the Internet community will address the issue. That’s fine! But how and when will they solve the Residential IoT vulnerability problem. Residential IoT needs to be Secured, Monitored and its software Updated. Enterprise IoT already contemplates this, but Residential IoT does not. Individual devices are sold with no security, and in the best case, if they are well developed and secured they still need to be monitored because software always has vulnerabilities, no matter how well and secure it has been developed.

All the questions, above cannot be solved using secure policies inside IoT or in the Internet itself. More has to be done! This is a Game Changer; Home Networks have to be monitored and secured to prevent Malware and Attacks. If not, the Internet will soon be like Hell.

The Residential IoT Avalanche

Gartner estimates that by 2020 there will be 25 billion IoT devices, of these, 13 billion will be Residential Home Devices, more than 50% of the total. Imagine if only 1% of these devices are vulnerable, there will be 13 million devices to hack.

  • Are the Internet Home Users aware of the risk they are taking?
  • Are their Home Networks and GateWays (GW/Router) secure?
  • Will the Internet itself be reliable and secure?

How to Secure Home Networks

Twenty years ago, Home Networks only had PCs, with well-developed software, for examples Windows, but many vulnerabilities were used to Hack Residential and Enterprise PCs. This problem brought up many Anti Malware (AM) Software Companies to safeguard Windows PCs. The same is happening right now with Residential IoT.

IoT devices don’t have the possibility or suppliers are not interested in incorporating AM software to their IoT. They are generally too small and only have specific dedicated software, i.e.: they cannot be easily protected with AM Software embedded in their devices:

  • This is a big problem. How can it be solved?
  • Where and how can AM software safeguard Home Networks, GWs and IoT?

Every Home Network connects to the Internet through the GW, which is the main door into our Home. As with Houses, shouldn’t an armored door be used to prevent thieves from coming in? The GW is the door to the Internet and it is also another device with CPU and Memory, a processing unit that can do the job. Why not use it to block hackers before they even get in? Thanks to FTTH and IoT itself, Gateways have become more powerful. If a GW does not have the power to cope with AM Security, then a security appliance should be connected to it. Using a secure GW, the entire Home Network will be protected from Malware and Attacks.

Many Security Providers and new startups have already foreseen the Secure GW solution.

Current Residential IoT/GW Security Innovation Trends

As described before, the most effective scenario to protect your Home IoT is to Safeguard the Home Network using the GW, this is currently being done with two innovative solutions:

Solution #1.              Attach a physical AM Security Appliance to the Home GW.

Solution #2.              Embedding AM Security software directly into the Home GW.

Solution #1 Is an interesting and effective approach, another device with more CPU and Memory means more processing power, but it adds another gadget to the end-user and it has to be physically connect to the Home GW’s 1Gbit Port.

The Pros: The Appliance adds an extra device to manage security, leaving the GW as it is. The customers will manage alerts and/or security configurations through a simple app on their smartphones. 

The Cons: All the traffic will bypass the appliance through a 1Gbit port, which needs a cable connected to the GW. Customers want to reduce physical gadgets, they already have many, such as the GW itself, IPTV DVB Decoder, the ONT, Game Station, Printers, cables, etc. Another device is not a bad solution but the current trend is to reduce home devices and cables, this solution will work but in a few years Solution #2 will make Solution #1 obsolete.

Solution #2. The Security Software will come within the GW device or it will remotely be installed.

The Pros: The customer will only manage alerts and/or security configurations, with a simple mobile app, that’s all. Simple, no physical appliance, no wires. 

The Cons: Many of the current GW hardware devices don’t have sufficient physical CPU and/or Memory capacity to manage security software, but with the FTTH and the IoT boom, Gateways are becoming more and more powerful and in a few years, most of them, if not all, will have the power to manage AM software.

Make it Simple, Intelligent and Economically Viable for Retail

Both solutions have their pros and cons, and both should, at least, address basic security surveillance. There are many threats that can be addressed using Cloud Intelligent Processing, analyzing Home Network Metadata (GW CPU will be liberated from many security tasks). But, most important of all is the combined Residential Cloud Intelligence, for example; if a new threat is detected and blocked on a provider’s vulnerable IoT device, the solution will automatically be propagated to all of the security providers’ customers, avoiding mass propagation and hacking damage. 

Residential Device “Internet Use Patterns” will be supervised and any mismatch will be reported to the customer or automatically be blocked if a malicious attacker is detected.

Customers don’t or cannot give proper maintenance to their Home IoT. The solution should or will control possible problems like vulnerable firmware, recommend changing easy or default passwords, block dangerous port access, grant or deny access, etc. Most of these simple actions will be prompted on the users’ smartphone, and the problem will easily be solved using a simple one click menu.

And finally, and probably most important, customers don’t want and can’t pay for a highly sophisticated solution. A next generation firewall type solution is way out of scope and expensive, the solution has to be smart and economically viable or sales will draw back.

There is no need to drill down into what can be done and what cannot, both solutions are effective. Solution #1 is good but #2 is in the core of the Home Network, the GW, and simpler for the end user, but it may take some time before all the GWs have sufficient power and capacity. 

Conclusions

  • There are millions of Residential IoT Devices being hacked, but most users are unaware and the press doesn’t really talk about it.
  • Residential IoT is in general insecure and with the predicted IoT Avalanche, hackers will take advantage of the situation to make the Internet be like Hell.
  • Residential IoT must be Secured, Monitored and its software Updated using the Home GW Router.
  • Make it Simple, Intelligent and Economically Viable for Retail.
  • IoT Residential Customers must be 100% aware of the Security risks, this must be strongly driven by Consumer Agencies, Governments, The Press, IoT Suppliers and Security Vendors.

If the security actions described in this publication are not addressed correctly, the Internet and all of us will have to learn the hard way. 

Juan Mora Zamorano

Independent Security Contractor

https://es.linkedin.com/in/morajuan

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IoT Future – 34 Billion new Devices in 4 Years?

Many industry experts and consumers are pointing the Internet of Things (IoT) as an upcoming Industrial Revolution or an upcoming Internet.

Why this? Simple, because IoT will consist of the future form of interaction of businesses, governments and consumers with the physical world.

The most recent studies indicate that in 2020 more than 34 billion devices will be connected to the internet, in many sectors (Industrial, Agriculture, Transportation, Wearable Devices, Smart Cities, Smart Houses, etc).

Of these 34 billion, the IoT will be responsible for 23 billion devices, the others 11 billion will be represented by the regular devices, such as, smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, etc.

BI - IoT - Evolution Graph - IoT FutureSource: BI Intelligence

The business sector will be responsible for the biggest use part of this devices, since the IoT can reduce the Operational Costs, Increase the Production, expand the business for new market niches.

Government will take the second biggest part of the devices connected, in smart cities, fasting up the public process, increasing the quality life of the citizens.

At last but not less important, the home user, will have a lot of IoT Devices, Smart Houses, Wearable Devices.

So the future we can really specify in some words: "The future is Data".

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12 Steps to Stop the Next IoT Attack in its Tracks

The recent distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) IoT attack against DNS is a wake up call to how fragile the Internet can be.

The IoT attack against Domain Name Servers from a botnet of thousands of devices means it’s way past time to take IoT security seriously. The bad actors around the world who previously used PCs, servers and smartphones to carry out attacks have now set their sights on the growing tidal wave of IoT devices. It’s time for consumers and enterprises to protect themselves and others by locking down their devices, gateways and platforms. While staying secure is a never-ending journey, here’s a list of twelve actions you can take to get started:

  1. Change the default usernames and passwords on your IoT devices and edge gateways to something strong.
  2. Device telemetry connections must be outbound-only. Never listen for incoming commands or you’ll get hacked.
  3. Devices should support secure boot with cryptographically signed code by the manufacturer to ensure firmware is unaltered.
  4. Devices must have enough compute power and RAM to create a transport layer security (TLS) tunnel to secure data in transit.
  5. Use devices and edge gateways that include a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip to securely store keys, connection strings and passwords in hardware.
  6. IoT platforms must maintain a list of authorized devices, edge gateways, associated keys and expiration dates/times to authenticate each device.
  7. The telemetry ingestion component of IoT platforms must limit IP address ranges to just those used by managed devices and edge gateways.
  8. Since embedded IoT devices and edge gateways are only secure at a single point in time, IoT platforms must be able to remotely update their firmware to keep them secure.
  9. When telemetry arrives in an IoT platform, the queue, bus or storage where data comes to rest must be encrypted.
  10. Devices and edge gateways managed by an IoT platform must update/rotate their security access tokens prior to expiration.
  11. Field gateways in the fog layer must authenticate connected IoT devices, encrypt their data at rest and then authenticate with upstream IoT platforms.
  12. IoT platforms must authenticate each device sending telemetry and blacklist compromised devices to prevent attacks.

Keeping the various components that make up the IoT value chain secure requires constant vigilance. In addition to doing your part, it’s important to hold the vendors of the IoT devices, gateways and platforms accountable for delivering technology that’s secure today and in the future.

Read more…

What’s inside the Internet of Things?

The Internet evolution has achieved the level when it is simply here for us at all times. We don’t even think of how we connect to a network, nor analyze the connection technical details, as well as we don’t care about who our communications service provider is. All-round Wi-Fi penetration and gradual IPv6 extension enable thousands of simple devices and trackers to interoperate continuously and send data “to the cloud”. Fast infrastructure advancement resulted in substituting the older Machine-to-Machine (M2M) term for more up-to-date Internet of Things (IoT) one.

Building up sort of distributed intelligence, IoT devices yet need centralized management, a system or service able to fine-tune the devices, provide storage and interpret collected data. Being the “brain” of the device cloud infrastructure, the management system also enlarges machine knowledge bases and updates device software.

Operators study data aggregated by groups or time periods and visualize it. This data is then delivered to various Business Intelligence Systems for more detailed analysis. Curiously enough, even if we speak about personal devices (e.g. fitness trackers), almost every cloud service operator analyses the collected data usage statistics anonymously for further device/service development.

Development of IoT devices becomes simpler and cheaper enabling small companies to enter the market. Plenty of businesses realize the need of building a management system, but they underestimate its development complexity and ignore the need of using industrial server technologies (such as failover clustering and multi-server distributed architecture). Typically, such a development starts in house. IoT devices successfully introduced in the market lead to rapid growth of users, causing long-term problems with service scaling and performance.

Anticipating further problems and being unable to form a server-based software development team quickly, IoT operators usually outsource the central system development focusing on devices only. Yet, it doesn’t solve the problem as third-party developers start building the system from scratch with lack of time and resources to apply serious technologies.

AggreGate Platform was born in 2002. At that time we were producing serial-over-IP converters and needed a central server that would transmit data between converters hidden by firewalls or NAT and having no chance to communicate directly. The first product version called LinkServer was written in C++ and was available only as a service simply transmitting data flows without any processing.

Short while later our converters developed into freely programmable controllers. They “understood” data flowing through them, thus we wanted the central server to do the same thing. At about the same time we realized that 90% of time spent for developing a monitoring and device management system was reinventing the wheel with very little effort put into solving certain business problems.

Since 2004 the system ported on Java has evolved as a framework for device management. For quite a few years we worked without clear understanding of the result we want to achieve. Fortunately, we have avoided work with a single customer or in a single industry by keeping our system flexible.

Now AggreGate Platform is applied to a great variety of industries, including Remote Monitoring and Service, IT Infrastructure and Network Monitoring, SCADA/HMI and Process Automation, Access Control, Building Automation, Fleet Management, Vending Machine and Self-service Kiosk Management, Sensor Network Monitoring, People and Vehicle Counting, Centralized Event and Incident Management, Digital Signage and Mobile Device Management.

 

Major Platform Tasks

Figuratively speaking, AggreGate is a LEGO constructor for prompt device cloud interface development. Allowing IoT solution architects to focus mainly on hardware and business logic, it solves the following infrastructure tasks:

  • Maintaining communication between servers and devices connected via unreliable cellular and satellite links
  • Unified approach to device data regardless of its physical meaning
  • Storing large volumes of collected events and historical data in various databases (relational, round-robin, NoSQL)
  • Visual building of complex source data analysis and event correlation chains
  • Modeling multiple device data integration and all infrastructure KPIs calculation processes
  • Fast operator and system engineer interface building using out-of-the-box “bricks” without any coding
  • Implementing integration scenarios via ready-to-use universal connectors (SQL, HTTP/HTTPS, SOAP, CORBA, SNMP, etc.)

 

System Unification

Being universal, AggreGate Platform unites various monitoring and management systems. It helps avoid extra integration points and decreases the number of integration scenarios. For example, the integrated monitoring system has a single integration point with Service Desk/ITSM/Maintenance Management systems for incident (alert) delivery. It also integrates with Inventory/Asset Management systems for collecting information on available physical assets and their influence on business services.

In such cases, role-based access control provides various departments with customized system scenarios and unique operator interfaces.

Platform Architecture

The Platform includes the following essential components:

  • Server is a Java-based application providing communication with devices, data storage and its automated processing. Servers can group into clusters for high availability and keep peer-to-peer relations in distributed installations. AggreGate Server manages an embedded web server which in its turn supports web interfaces.
  • Unified Console is a crossplatform desktop client software ensuring simultaneous work with one or several servers in administrator, system engineer or operator mode.
  • Agent is a library that can be integrated into an IoT device firmware to ensure communication with servers, device setup unification, performing operations with a device and asynchronous event sending. There are a lot of libraries (Java, .NET, C/C++, Android Java, etc.). No need to deploy an agent if communications with the server are performed using standard or proprietary protocols. In the latter case a separate device driver is developed for the server. The agent can be also implemented as a separate hardware device (gateway).
  • Open-source API for extending functionality of all other components and implementing complex integration scenarios.

The Server supervises device data reading and writing changes. This process is called bidirectional synchronization. The server creates a device snapshot containing last values of device metrics and changes carried out by operators or system modules and not written to a device due to communication downtime. Configuration changes are delivered to devices on the “best effort” basis enabling to configure device groups, even if some devices are offline.

The Server also provides receiving and processing incoming device connections that have no white static IP addresses.

Device data and events merge into a unified data model. Within this model, each device is represented as a so-called context in a hierarchical context structure. Each context includes a set of formalized data elements of three types: variables (properties, settings, attributes), functions (methods, operations), and events (notifications). A context also contains metadata describing all available elements. Therefore, all context data and metadata are entirely stored in the current context. This technology is called device normalization. Device drivers and agents create a normalized presentation of various device types.

There are some parallels with object-oriented programming, where objects typically have properties, events and methods. Properties are internal device variables, methods are operations performed by a device, and events describe how a device notifies the server of internal data or environment changes.

Virtually any device can be described as a set of properties, methods and events. For example, a remotely controlled water tank can have a “water level” property to show the current amount of water in the tank and “turn valve on/off” methods to control the valve letting the water into/out of the tank. This smart water tank may also generate a number of notifications, such as “nearly empty”, “nearly full” and “overflow”. We have developed more than 100 Java-based drivers, and the normalization concept has also proved to be an advantage. Moreover, a lot of current “universal” protocols (such as OPC UA, JMX or WMI) use similar data models.

All Server contexts are a part of a hierarchical structure called context tree. Though the contexts match diverse objects (devices, users, reports, alerts, etc.), they have a unified interface and can interoperate within the server context tree, offering a high level of flexibility. The same principle enables various servers to interact in a distributed installation.


Every connected device allows operators to perform direct configuration (device configuration reading and modification), direct management (forcing device operation performance manually), and direct monitoring (viewing the device event log in near-real-time mode).

Events and changes of device metric values are stored in the server storage. Depending on the system task, the storage type can vary. For example, if it’s the Raspberry Pi microserver, the simplest file storage is used, while the central server of a distributed installation can use NoSQL-based Apache Cassandra cluster storing dozens of thousands events per second out of original stream with hundreds of thousands events per second.

However, in most cases a regular relational database is used as storage. Using ORM layer (Hibernate) provides compatibility with MySQL, Oracle, Microsoft SQL Server, PostgreSQL, and other DBMS.

Device data and events affect the life cycle of active server objects allowing the server to react to environmental condition changes. These active objects include:

  • Alerts converting a particular seamless object state or event chain to a new event type called incident
  • Models converting source events and values into user-defined events and value types by using business rules
  • Scheduler assuring task performance on schedule even when the server is shut off
  • Sensors and several other object types


Active objects are able to add new types of variables, functions and events in the unified data model, send custom variables and event changes to storage, and invoke device and other object operations in automated mode.

You can use widgets for building data entry forms, tables, dynamic maps, charts and HMIs. They can be combined in dashboards, both global (based on aggregated KPIs and showing the whole infrastructure state) and object-oriented (displaying a single device or infrastructure component state).


Widgets and report templates are built in specialized visual editors seamlessly integrated in the Aggregate Platform ecosystem. The GUI Builder helps design complex interfaces consisting of multiple nested containers with visual components. In addition to absolute layout typical for editors, you can use grid layout familiar to those who came across table editing in HTML page. The grid layout makes it possible to build scalable multi-size data entry forms and tables.

As a result, first-line or second-line operator interfaces developed by using data visualization tools include dashboards with widgets, forms, tables, diagrams, reports, HMIs, and navigation between them.

The GUI Builder supports dozens of out-of-the-box components, such as captions, text fields, buttons, checkboxes, sliders as well as spinners, lists, date/time selectors, scales, and pointers. Among more complex components are trees, video windows, dynamic vector SVG images, geographical maps based on Google Maps/Bing/Yandex/OpenStreetMap. The list of supported diagrams includes classic charts, statistics charts, Gantt charts, and polar charts.

All widgets designed in the GUI Builder operate via web interface, including non-Java browsers, i.e. on mobile devices. You only need HTML5 and JavaScript support.

Properties related to server objects (devices, models, alerts) and UI components are linked together using bindings. Such bindings define when and where data should be taken, how to process it and where to place the results. While processing data, the bindings use expression and query languages.

A binding using an expression resembles Microsoft Excel formula. Such a formula takes data from several cells, applies mathematical operations or data processing functions to it, and places the result into the current cell. An expression is also a formula describing where data should be taken from and what sort of changes to apply to it.

The query language is very similar to regular SQL. It also aggregates data from various tables into one by using filtering, sorting, grouping, etc. The difference between the classic SQL and the embedded query language is that the latter uses virtual tables built on-the-fly from diverse unified model data as a source. Every query checks operator/system object access permissions automatically. With this in mind, the query language has an obvious advantage over direct SQL queries to the server database.

To solve more challenging data processing tasks, you can easily write a script in Java or even a dedicated plugin. However, every script written for data processing by any of our partners is a warning for us: why does one need A platform if classic development out of familiar environment (such as Eclipse or Idea) is still required?

And finally, a few words about the distributed architecture technology. Our concept implies customization of peering relationships between servers so that a server (provider) links a part of its unified data model to the other server (consumer). This allows the consumer server objects to equally interact with the provider server objects. A single server can have unlimited links, moreover, such a server can be both a provider and a consumer towards neighboring servers.

 Distributed architecture ensures solving various large-scale system tasks:

  • Horizontal system scaling.
  • Distributed monitoring with local monitoring server installations and intermediate data storage at remote sites.

Vertical scaling, dividing functions between servers into several logic levels.

Read more…

Interactive Map of IoT Organizations -- TAKE 2

I am excited to launch the 2nd version of my Interactive Map of IoT Organizations  Thanks for all the support and encouragement from David Oro!

https://www.diku.ca/blog/2016/12/04/interactive-map-of-iot-organizations-take-2/

Here are the material changes from the first version:

  1. Each organization now has their specific address instead of being city-based
  2. Now includes the Founder(s) of the organization and a link to more information about them. This is in addition to the “Founded” year which was in the first version
  3. Cleanup of categories. Folks are still trying to determine what it means to be an IoT Platform. For me, it’s most important to focus on standards and integration of systems as there will be organizations that specialize in one aspect of an IoT platform whether it’s the analytics, rules engine, device management, workflow, or visualization functions.
  4. The initial launch of the map had 246 organizations, this new map has 759 organizations. Thanks to many people on LinkedIn and through blog comments for suggesting their companies which accounted for 180 additional organizations. The other 330+ organizations I have been finding on my own by trolling news, Twitter, IoT conference Web sites, “Partners” sections of each organization.

I set up a Twitter account @EyeOhTee and although I still need to tweet more, you may see some interesting news on there and feel free to tweet out this post, plug plug!

Besides the basic data shown on the map, I also track many more attributes of each product. I will publish additional findings and analysis on this blog and here on IoT Central.

I hope you find the map useful and I would love to hear if, and how, it has helped you. Whether you located a company in your area to collaborate or a supplier for a problem you are trying to solve or just learning like me it will have made it worth the time I spend on this.

BGJ

Read more…

TPS-based Office Aircon Controller Application

Figure:1 TPS-based aircon controller

TPS-based aircon controller

Air conditioning is a consumptive business while air conditioners are big-ticket to run. In general, AC systems, older ones, in particular, do not have any real temperature feedback. You set the temperature on your remote, but alas, it has absolutely nothing to do with the actual temperature in the room. Even when it gets colder outsides, many aircons keep blasting cold air into your space. As a result, you have to constantly readjust the temperature as needed for optimal comfort throughout the day.

No doubt, AC systems are improving day by day, but there are still old systems that cannot get updated. In some instances, it’s absolutely impossible to invest in a new system. Sometimes, it is just a catch 22 to rip the old aircon out and install a new one. A basic aircon has many parts that typically are split between an outside and inside configuration, hence you may have to undergo a drastic interior renovation. In Tibbo office in Taipei, we have got trapped in an identical situation. We just have to get by with the AC system we’ve got. Our aircon is controlled with a dozen of infrared remotes lying around.

Some time ago, we set out to create a management system for our dated HVAC system. We used Tibbo Project System (TPS) for this endeavor. Our spec for the aircon controller consisted of exactly two items:

  • The aircon must run or not run depending on whether the lights are on or off. The formula is simple: no lights = no people = no need to run the AC.
  • The temperature in the room must be monitored by the device that stops the aircon whenever the temperature is cooled off to the preset point.

To achieve our goal, we used a TPS2L system equipped with these Tibbits:

  • Ambient temperature probe
  • IR code processor Tibbit (#26)
  • IR front-end Tibbit (#27)
  • Ambient light sensor Tibbit (#28)

Let us tell you about the probe.The probe replaces the ambient temperature meter (Tibbit #29). It is nice to have the meter built right into the TPS. The problem is, the meter is affected by the internal heat of the TPSsystem itself. This influence is especially noticeable for the TPS2L device – it’s LCD really warms up the box! The new probe has the same circuit as the Tibbit #29, with the added benefit of being external to the TPSdevice. Now the measurements are accurate.

Here is a look at the items you need to set up in the menu:

IR commands. This is where you train your IR code processor to be able to transmit two commands: “On,” and “Off.” For the “On” command, use the lowest temperature that your aircon’s remote allows you to set (usually 16 degrees C). The logic here is that when you need to lower the temperature in the room you can use the coldest temperature setting, and when the room cools down to the preset temperature, the aircon is turned off. So really, you only need two commands.

Target temperature. You don’t need to set it here. There are dedicated buttons on the main screen.

Pre-cool start time. This is something we added along the way. Now it is possible to turn the aircon on, once a day, even before we all arrive at the office. Our day starts at 9 am. We set this time for 8:30 am, and by the time we get in, the office is nice and cool (while the scorching Taipei summer keeps on raging outside). The pre-cool timer is hardcoded for 45 minutes. If the lights are still off at 9:15 the aircon is turned off.

*Brightness threshold. *This is the brightness that the TPS will consider to correspond to “lights on.” The value is not expressed in any standard measurement units; it’s just the value the Tibbit #28 returns. So, how do you know what number to set here? Simple: the brightness is displayed on the main screen, like this: “Light level: 718”. Note the value with the lights off and on, then set the threshold to some value in the middle between the two.

Temp. meas. adjustment. This is useful for when you choose to use the Tibbit #29. As we’ve explained above, its measurements are affected by the internal heat of the TPS itself. You can use a regular thermometer and determine the measurement error. For example, if your thermometer reads 25C, and TPS shows 28C, then you must adjust the temperature by 3 degrees C. The data returned by the new external probe need no adjustment.

Further work

In phase 2 of this project we will connect our aircon controller to an AggreGate server. It will be possible to control the system via a smartphone app, which we going to design for this purpose. Now you know why our configuration menu has items like Network, AggreGate, etc. Stay tuned!

Figure:2 Aircon

Figure 2  Aircon

Read more…

Tibbo Project System (TPS) is a highly configurable, affordable, and innovative automation platform. It is ideal for home, building, warehouse, and production floor automation projects, as well as data collection, distributed control, industrial computing, and device connectivity applications.

Suppliers of traditional “control boxes” (embedded computers, PLCs, remote automation and I/O products, etc.) typically offer a wide variety of models differing in their I/O capabilities. Four serial ports and six relays. Two serial ports and eight relays. One serial port, four relays, and two sensor inputs. These lists go on and on, yet never seem to contain just the right mix of I/O functions you are looking for.

Rather than offering a large number of models, Tibbo Technology takes a different approach: Our Tibbo Project System (TPS) utilizes Tibbits® – miniature electronic blocks that implement specific I/O functions. Need three RS232 ports? Plug in exactly three RS232 Tibbits! Need two relays? Use a relay Tibbit. This module-based approach saves you money by allowing you to precisely define the features you want in your automation controller.

Here is a closer look at the process of building a custom Tibbo Project System.

Start with a Tibbo Project PCB (TPP)

 

 

A Tibbo Project PCB is the foundation of TPS devices.

Available in two sizes – medium and large – each board carries a CPU, memory, an Ethernet port, power input for +5V regulated power, and a number of sockets for Tibbit Modules and Connectors.

Add Tibbit® Blocks

Tibbits (as in “Tibbo Bits”) are blocks of prepackaged I/O functionality housed in brightly colored rectangular shells. Tibbits are subdivided into Modules and Connectors.

Want an ADC? There is a Tibbit Module for this. 24V power supply? Got that! RS232/422/485 port? We have this, and many other Modules, too.

Same goes for Tibbit Connectors. DB9 Tibbit? Check. Terminal block? Check. Infrared receiver/transmitter? Got it. Temperature, humidity, and pressure sensors? On the list of available Tibbits, too.

Assemble into a Tibbo Project Box (TPB)

Most projects require an enclosure. Designing one is a tough job. Making it beautiful is even tougher, and may also be prohibitively expensive. Finding or making the right housing is a perennial obstacle to completing low-volume and hobbyist projects.

Strangely, suppliers of popular platforms such as Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBone do not bother with providing any enclosures, and available third-party offerings are primitive and flimsy.

Tibbo understands enclosure struggles and here is our solution: Your Tibbo Project System can optionally be ordered with a Tibbo Project Box (TPB) kit.

The ingenious feature of the TPB is that its top and bottom walls are formed by Tibbit Connectors. This eliminates a huge problem of any low-volume production operation – the necessity to drill holes and openings in an off-the-shelf enclosure.

The result is a neat, professionally looking housing every time, even for projects with the production quantity of one.

Like boards, our enclosures are available in two sizes – medium and large. Medium-size project boxes can be ordered in the LCD/keypad version, thus allowing you to design solutions incorporating a user interface.

 

Unique Online Configurator

To simplify the process of planning your TPS we have created an Online Configurator.

Configurator allows you to select the Tibbo Project Board (TPP), “insert” Tibbit Modules and Connectors into the board’s sockets, and specify additional options. These include choosing whether or not you wish to add a Tibbo Project Box (TPB) enclosure, LCD and keypad, DIN rail mounting kit, and so on. You can choose to have your system shipped fully assembled or as a parts kit.

Configurator makes sure you specify a valid system by watching out for errors. For example, it verifies that the total power consumption of your future TPS device does not exceed available power budget. Configurator also checks the placement of Tibbits, ensuring that there are no mistakes in their arrangement.

Completed configurations can be immediately ordered from our online store. You can opt to keep each configuration private, share it with other registered users, or make it public for everyone to see.

Develop your application


Like all programmable Tibbo hardware, Tibbo Project System devices are powered by Tibbo OS (TiOS).

Use our free Tibbo IDE (TIDE) software to create and debug sophisticated automation applications in Tibbo BASIC, Tibbo C, or a combination of the two languages.

To learn more about the Tibbo Project System click here

Read more…

OPC Server from Tibbo Technology

OPC – «Open Platform Communications» – is a set of standards and specifications for manufacturing telecommunication. OPC specifies the transfer of real-time plant data between control devices from various producers. OPC was designed to process control hardware and support a common bridge for Windows-based software applications. OPC was aimed to reduce the number of duplicated effort performed by hardware manufacturers and their software partners.

 

The most typical OPC specification, OPC Data Access (OPC DA), is supported by Tibbo OPC Server. Any device compatible with the Tibbo AggreGate protocol can be a data source. AggreGate is a white-label IoT integration platform using up-to-date network technologies to control, configure, monitor and support electronic devices, along with distributed networks of such electronic devices. It also helps you collect device data in the cloud, where you can slice and dice it in alignment with your needs. In addition, the platform lets other enterprise applications transparently access this data via the AggreGate server.

Tibbo OPC server has embedded AggreGate network protocol. It can both interact with any Tibbo devices via AggreGate agent protocol and connect to AggreGate server. The AggreGate agent protocol open-source solution is published for Java, C#, and C++ programming languages, so your connection scheme is not restricted to AggreGate server  or Tibbo devices only.

 

Examples

A simple example: TPS reads Tibbit #29 (Ambient temperature meter) and forwards data to OPC server via AggreGate agent protocol.

A more complex example: we have a Windows-based PC controlling a wood processing machine by means of AggreGate server through the Modbus protocol. If Tibbo OPC server is linked with AggreGate server, the data from the machine is sent to Tibbo OPC server, and therefore, we can operate and monitor the machine via any OPC client.

Technical Specification

  • Compatibility with Windows XP/2003 or later (Microsoft Visual C++ 2013 redistributable is required - installed automatically)

  • Support of DA Asynchronous I/O 2.0 and Synchronous I/O with COM/DCOM technology

Tibbo OPC Server transmits the information on the Value, Quality and Timestamp of an item (tag) to the OPC Client applications. These fields are read from the AggreGate variables.

 

The process values are set to Bad [Configuration Error] quality if OPC Server loses communication with its data source (AggreGate Agent or AggreGate Server). The quality is set to Uncertain [Non-Specific] if the AggreGate variable value is empty.

In the following chart below you can see a concordance table of the AggreGate variables and the OPC data types:

AggreGate Data Type OPC Data Type
INTEGER VT_I4
STRING VT_BSTR
BOOLEAN VT_BOOL
LONG VT_I8
FLOAT VT_R4
DOUBLE VT_R8
DATE VT_DATE
DATATABLE OPC VT_BSTR (by default)
COLOR VT_I4
DATA VT_BSTR

To learn more about Tibbo OPC server, click here

Read more…

Will There Be A Dominant IIoT Cloud Platform?

When you think about consumer cloud platforms, which ones come to mind? Amazon AWSMicrosoft Azure and Google’s Cloud Platform are likely to be at the top of your list. But what about industrial cloud platforms? Which ones rise to the top for you? Well, GE’s PredixSiemen's MindSphere, and the recently announced Honeywell Sentience are likely to be on any short list of industrial cloud platforms. But they aren’t the only ones in this space. Cisco's JasperIBM’s Watson IoTMeshifyUptake, and at least 20 others are competing to manage all those billions of sensors that are expected to encompass the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Which one do you think will end up dominating the market?

A Brief Overview of Cloud Computing

To answer the above question, let's start with a very brief overview of cloud computing to put industrial cloud platforms in their proper context. Cloud platforms are one of several services that cloud computing providers offer, with the main ones being: Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), and Software as a Service (SaaS).

  • Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) – does the provision processing, storage, networks, and other basic computing resources. The IaaS is used to deploy other services (i.e., PaaS and SaaS), as well as web applications. Customers don't manage or control the IaaS, but they are able to access to the servers and storage, and can operate a virtual data center in the cloud. There are a lot of IaaS providers. The biggest ones are Amazon Web Services (AWS), Windows Azure, Google Compute Engine, Rackspace Open Cloud, and IBM SmartCloud Enterprise. ( GE’s Predix platform for the Industrial Internet will be available to run on Microsoft Windows Azure Cloud.)
  • Platform as a Service (PaaS) – used for applications development, and providing cloud components to software. A PaaS makes it quick and easy and to develop, test, and deploy applications. Customers can't control or manage the underlying infrastructure, but they can control the applications and configuration of application-hosting environment. GE’s Predix, Honeywell's Sentience, and Siemens's MindSphere are PaaS's for industrial applications. Software development firms such as CumulocityBosch IoT, and Carriots are also provide PaaS’s for industry.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) – delivers cloud-based applications to a user via a web browser or a program interface. The advantage of a SaaS is that you don't need to run or install specific applications on individual computers, which not only saves time and money, it also simplifies maintenance and support. Common SaaS examples include: Google Apps and Cisco WebExSiemens's Industrial Machinery Catalyst on the Cloud is an example of an Industrial SaaS (using AWS infrastructure).

Three Main Services of Cloud Computing

Software as a Service (SaaS)

Platform as a Service (PaaS)

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

Industrial Cloud Platforms by Industrial Companies

Industrial cloud platforms have a much deeper focus on operational technology than consumer platforms. They are designed to allow data gathering throughout manufacturing production processes, in order to improve performance as well as predict failures before they happen. Here are three industrial cloud platforms by long time industrial companies:

  • GE Predix: is a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) specifically designed for industrial data and analytics. It can capture and analyze the unique volume, velocity and variety of machine data within a highly secure, industrial-strength cloud environment. GE Predix is designed to handle data types that consumer cloud services are not built to handle.
  • Siemens MindSphere is an open platform, based on the SAP HANA (PaaS) cloud, which allows developers to build, extend, and operate cloud-based applications. OEMs and application developers can access the platform via open interfaces and use it for services and analysis such as the online monitoring of globally distributed machine tools, industrial robots, or industrial equipment such as compressors and pumps. MindSphere also allows customers to create digital models of their factories with real data from the production process.
  • Honeywell Sentience is the recently announced cloud infrastructure by Honeywell Process Solutions. It is a secure, scalable, standards-based “One Honeywell” IoT platform, that will be able to accelerate time-to-market of connected solutions, lower the cost-to-market, and enable new innovative SaaS business models. It will have the ability to run global security standards embedded throughout the solution and make applications that are plug & play and scalable.

Industrial Cloud Platforms by Software Development Firms

Industrial companies aren’t the only ones developing industrial cloud platforms. There’s already a long list of industrial cloud platforms available from software development firms. Here are a few worth mentioning:

  • C3 IoT is a PaaS that enables organizations to leverage data – telemetry from sensors and devices, data from diverse enterprise information systems, and data from external sources (such as social media, weather, traffic, and commodity prices) – and employ advanced analytics and machine learning at scale, in real time, to capture business insights for improved operations, enhanced customer engagement, and differentiated products and services. C3 IoT is led by Silicon Valley entrepreneur Thomas Siebel. It has closed deals with the U.S. State Department and the French utility ENGIE SA, based on C3 IoT’s focus on machine-generated data.
  • Uptake: is a predictive analytics SaaS platform provider that offers industrial companies the ability to optimize performance, reduce asset failures, and enhance safety. Uptake integrates data science and workflow connectivity to provide high-value solutions using massive data sets. In 2015, it entered into a partnership with heavy construction equipment manufacturer Caterpillar to jointly develop an end-to-end platform for predictive diagnostics in order to help Caterpillar customers monitor and optimize their fleets more effectively.
  • Meshify is an Industrial IoT platform for tracking, monitoring, analyzing devices. The Meshify suite of tools provides all the features needed to deploy, monitor, control, and analyze the results of an IoT solution. Despite being a young technology business, it has a growing portfolio of clients with industrial-oriented companies, including Henry Pump, Sierra Resources, Stallion Oilfield Services, Gems Sensors & Controls and MistAway Systems.
Table 1: The List of Industrial Cloud Platform Providers

Amazon AWS

AT&T M2X

Bosch IoT

Carriots

Cumulocity

GE Predix

IBM Watson IoT

Intel IoT

Cisco Jasper

Losant IoT

MS Azure

ThingWorx

SAP Hana Cloud

Thethings.io

C3IoT

Uptake

Amplia IoT

XMPRO

Meshify

TempoIQ

Bitstew Systems

Siemens MindSphere

AirVantage

Honeywell Sentience

What Do You Think Will Be The Future of the Industrial Cloud?

Will there be a dominant Industrial Cloud Platform? It's hard to say at this point. GE Predix is hoping for 500,000 connected devices by the beginning of 2017, while C3 IoT is said to have 70 million devices connected to its platform already.

The Crowded Cloud of Industrial Platforms

Will this market consolidate around a few big-name platforms, or will a lesser known provider be the winner and take all? 

This post originally appeared here. 

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6 things to avoid in transactional emails

transactional man typing

  You might think that once a sale has been made, or an email subscription confirmed, that your job is done. You’ve made the virtual handshake, you can have a well-earned coffee and sit down now right? Wrong! (You knew we were…

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Top 3 easiest-to-use activity trackers

Looking for an activity tracker to measure your heart rate or estimate your VO2 max score? This blog post isn’t for you. But if you want a simple, straightforward way to track steps and a few other activities — and you don't know what a VO2 max…

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