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Case Studies (166)

Best IoT Articles of 2017

As the year comes to a close, we combed through IoT Central’s website and pulled our most popular articles and interviews, revisited our most thought provoking pieces and analyzed numerous how-to’s to showcase the best of 2017. Below are 48 articles that are worth reviewing as you head into 2018. Enjoy.

Remember, encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here

January

8 Maps of the Internet of Things

Using Blockchain to Secure IoT

5 Rules for Manufacturers in Securing the Internet of Things

Securing the Internet of Everything

 

February

6 Videos That Will Get You Up to Speed on Blockchain

Regulating the Internet of Things

How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

How IoT is Changing the World: Cases from Visa, Airbus, Bosch & SNCF

 

March

Visual History of IoT — Far Beyond ‘Smart’ Things

The IoT-Connected Car of Today— Cases From Hertz, Nokia, NTT, Mojio & Concur Technologies

The IoT Architecture at the Edge

The Dream of a Unified and IIoT Enabled Industrial Communications Network…How Close Are We?

 

April

About IoT Platforms, Super Powers Methodology, Superheroes and Supervillains

Exposing the Abandonment of Things – A Trove of Lost Revenue

IoT Developer Trends 2017 Edition

The Rest of the Iceberg - The Looming IP Implications of the Industrial Internet of Things

 

May

Best practices for building recurring revenue from IoT-as-a-Service

Internet of (Medical) things in Healthcare

When Products Talk: The Expansion of the Internet of Things to the Internet of Everything

The Smart Agent: Enabling the Internet of Things

 

June

Not all Devices are IoT or IIoT

Interview: Why is it so hard to monetize the Internet of Things?

Hardware or Software Security: Which is right for my IoT Device?

The British Antarctic Survey Uses Rugged Data Transport

 

July

Future-Proofing Your IoT Infrastructure

Seven Industrial IoT Predictions for 2017 and Beyond

How Much Does it Cost to Build an IoT App?

Driving IoT Project Success - Ten Best Practices

 

August

20 Job Interview Questions for IoT Professionals

The 5D Architecture – A Standard Architecture for IoT

Interview: Bringing Machine Learning to The Edge

SCADA vs IoT: the role of SCADA systems in Manufacturing's Industry 4.0

 

September

Security Issues To Expect In Mobile App Development

Interview: The Rise of LoRa

5 IoT-based Business Models to Leverage

Why Edge Computing Is an IIoT Requirement

 

October

IoT Use Case - Battery Powered Device

International IIoT Perspectives: Fog Computing On a Global Scale

Rise of the Intelligent Revenue Machines

8 Reasons You Need IoT in Your Manufacturing Plant

 

November

IIoT protocols for the beginners

How to enable IoT Gateway Hardware Security?

Why There’s No Killer App for IoT

4 Ways to Optimize Your Operations for the Industrial IoT

 

December

Industrial Augmented Reality: Uses and Applications

McKinsey: Ten trends redefining enterprise IT infrastructure

All That You Need to Know About The Internet of Things Security

State of Home Automation Technology: What Makes Dumb Houses Smart?

 

Photo Credit Mike Ackerman

 


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MobiDev, an IoT software development company, has successfully developed an mobile application for connected cars.

The client, a vehicle electronics manufacturer from Germany, set the task to integrate a device installed in a smart car with a developed mobile app that allows to control wheel suspension of the car with a smartphone.

The project goal was to develop a reliable Internet of Things solution, starting from UI/UX design to implementation of the product for the achievement of the business goals of the product owner.

The application development started from prototyping and UI/UX design for both iOS and Android. Agile methodology was applied to the development process and a dedicated team of Project Manager, Quality Assurance Engineer, Client Care Manager, iOS Developer, Android Developer, UI/UX Designer was involved.

For interaction between the device and the mobile application, Bluetooth Low Energy technology was used to reduce energy consumption.

Quality assurance and software testing are critically important stages of IoT development, and the application, together with the hardware, was tested on a real car.

The product owner referenced MobiDev as a competent and responsive company for mobile application development and chose them for his further application development projects in the future.

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IoT Central Discussion Forums

Do you know about the IoT Central Discussion Forums? This is the place to ask pertinent questions and share knowledge with the IoT Central community in a less formal way than a blog post. Current forum topics include ROI, IoT and data lakesresources for IIoT app developers, and where to find IoT project management materials. To start a discussion on our forum, click here.

Below is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here.

All That You Need to Know About The Internet of Things Security

Posted by Mehul Rajput 

The Internet of Things can be easily victimized and so the security of the IoT becomes paramount under these circumstances. The world has already come under the scanner with major cyber threats such as the WannaCry Ransomware, NotPetya, etc. where the hackers were successful in millions of computer systems across the globe jeopardizing the entire internet networking. However, the cyber security experts are much apprehended over the fact that firms, internet users or neither the IoT manufactures are serious about the security of devices connected with the internet.

Can the Public Internet Secure Our Digital Assets?

Posted by Mary Clark 

There is a lot of talk, and, indeed, hype, these days about the internet of things. But what is often overlooked is that the internet of things is also an internet of shared services and shared data. What’s more, we are becoming too heavily reliant on public internet connectivity to underpin innovative new services.

State of Home Automation Technology: What Makes Dumb Houses Smart?

Posted by Andrei Klubnikin

Although the global Smart Home market is projected to top $ 14 billion this year, most Home Automation products available on the market right now are basic IoT devices connected to a smartphone app. With all those DIY solutions, universal remotes and standalone gadgets like Nest thermostat, the Smart House technology has never been more confusing. What does the future of Home Automation look like – and what makes dumb houses truly smart?

ICYMI: Embedded Software is Eating the World

Posted by David Oro

Software is eating the world wrote Marc Andreessen in The Wall Street Journal on August 20, 2011. Since that time every company in the world has beefed up their software teams and their digital transformation initiatives. Afterall, software is a key competitive advantage, and to survival.  In the IoT space, we often think about the application software that power industrial systems and consumer connected devices. But what about the embedded software written to control machines or devices that are not typically thought of as computers? This is almost everything, from a small digital watch, e-bikes, electronic control units in cars, microwaves and missile guidance systems. For insight we turned to Jeffrey Fortin, Head of Product Management, Vector Software.

Photo Credit: Xavier Bentes


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Have We Already Bored of Predicting IoT?

If you have read my post “Will finally be 2017, the year of Internet of Things? I do not think so.” you will have confirmed there were some analysts and companies who guessed and others who did not hit the bullseye.

As usual, numerous predictions about the Internet of Things (IoT) appear at the end of the year, some with foundation, others by interests and others by opportunism. Although I notice a certain fatigue this year perhaps due to the appearance of other cooler technologies or very likely to the lack of success and few differences from previous predictions. 

It may also be the last time I write an IoT prediction article.

Let's start by reviewing some of the 2017 predictions.

Successes and failures of IoT 2017 predictions

Sorry Morgan Stanley but 2017 has not been The Year Of Internet Of Things however is true that there is less hype around IoT.

Yes Forrester, we continue worried that there will be a large-scale IoT security breach.

As not many large IoT projects in 2017, the role of System Integrators has not been as important as IDC predicted.

Have you seen, Analysys Mason, key developments in LPWA technologies, connected cars and smart cities?

Who now, MachNation if Internet of Things platform revenue grow 116% in 2017. There are only financial numbers but we all agree with Sandhill that still many doubts how “Choose your platform.

It is true Forbes “The Internet of Things (IoT) is still a popular buzzword, but adoption will continue to be slow.” 

I have to say that Judith Hurwitz and Associates, were right that the growth will be in industrial sector rather than the consumer sector.

Hard to fail if you consider what Moor Insights & Strategy predicted: IoT is still in its infancy in terms of dollars and deployments, and that can’t last much longer, before market frustration sets in

Brave, ADLINK and FreeWave Technologies, Inc predicted that Edge computing will become a mainstream term for IIoT. 

Internet of Things Institute - “Recruiting Will Remain a Challenge for Organizations with IoT Initiatives” and sorry Teradata not many companies looking for Internet of Things architect role.

Tier-1 operators in the US and Europe happy with Northstream because IoT revenues contributing up to 3% of total revenue in 2017. 

Telefonica IoT and Cisco Jasper trusted that LPWA expansion to harness the growing IoT.

What will be of IoT in 2018?

According with Ericsson, in 2018, mobile phones are expected to be surpassed in numbers by IoT devices.

It seems that 2018 will be the year when AI and IoT will converge. But it will also be the year in which the CIOs will be busy integrating device management into overall IT infrastructure in a way that doesn’t overwhelm the organization. This is where the adoption of application robots, natural language processing (NLP) and AI automation of processes will come into their own, offering intelligent management of IoT deployments cheaply and efficiently. 

However, 2018 will not be the year of Blockchain and the IoT, because although Blockchain-based IoT adoption rises to 5%, Blockchain is not yet ready for large scale deployments requiring reliability, stability and seamless integration with existing technology infrastructure. But promising pilot projects are beginning to emerge and the maturation of IoT and blockchain technologies and products will drive blockchain adoption in 2018.

To reinforce the ongoing investment across the industry Gartner’s Strategic Trends for 2018 back up the focus on IoT with Intelligent Things, Digital Twins and Cloud to the Edge all making the list for the coming year. 

On the other hand, Forrester affirms that finally 2018 will be the year in which the Internet of Things moves from "experimentation to business scale". Forrester also predicts that IoT platform offerings will begin to specialize in “design” and “operate” scenarios.

Punctual to his annual appointment, IDC makes its Worldwide IoT 2018 Predictions. 

One more year, Citrix leading thinkers also share their predictions.

A small  startup, Imagimob considers 6 trends in the IoT and Industrial IoT-IIOT in 2018. As you can imagine Low Power Area Networks (LPWAN), Edge computing, AI on the edge and Blockchain are included.

IoT Security repeat predictions in 2018. Forrester in the same line predict More cyber threats and design specialization.

Fog Computing, Security, and Smarter Decisions are IoT Predictions for 2018 by Saar Yoskovitz, CEO of Augury, a preventive maintenance company.

The State of IoT In 2018 for Marketers: We’re going to experience a massive increase in the number of digitally connected devices, changing the game for marketers across the globe.

IoT 2018 – the next stage: the IoT of integration, value and action

IoT Will Move From Experimentation To Business Scale - 

5 IoT trends that will define 2018 - In 2018, IoT-based ventures will have greater access to startup capital and be taken more seriously in the market. 

Only one wish for IoT 2018 from my side

In spite, I am not in this list of 17 Experts Tell The Most Exciting IoT Trends to Watch for in 2018, I have a wish for 2018: 

“I hope that in 2018, all proofs of concept become successful projects and that the most innovative startups resist the temptation to be acquired." 

Thanks, in advance for your Likes and Shares.

 

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No Killer App for IoT?

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here.

4 Ways to Optimize Your Operations for the Industrial IoT

Posted by Scott Allen 

The phrase, “the future is here,” is overused and has evolved into a catchphrase for companies struggling to position themselves in times of technological or digital transformations. Still, the sentiment is understood, especially in times like today, where the Internet of Things is quite literally changing the way we think about hardware and software. We’d like to offer an addendum to the phrase: “The future is here more quickly than we thought it would be.” With that in mind, we wanted to provide some advice for companies across the industrial sector for the best ways to optimize operations for the Industrial IoT. 

IIoT protocols for the beginners

Posted by Vivart Kapoor 

We all know HTTP (hypertext transfer protocol). These are the first 4 alphabets which see on any URL of a website you open in your browser. In simple terms, it is a list of rules that define do’s and don’ts of communication between web browser and web server. It is like you (web browser) going to ATM (webserver) to get some cash (request). Here the HTTP will describe the complete procedure – enter pin, amount, etc. You get your cash (result) once you follow the mentioned steps. Quite simple.

The World Wide Web (WWW) works on HTTP as it is the only protocol used there for the data transfer. However, this is not the case in the Industrial (I) IoT world. Here we have a bunch of protocols to choose depending on the type of application or so-called “use case”. The most common among them are MQTT, CoAP and of course HTTP. Before we discuss them, let us first have a look at certain networking terminologies and definitions. 

Why There’s No Killer App for IoT

Guest Post by Daniel Elizalde

Every new technology trend brings speculation and talk about a “killer app” that will be the solution to all of our problems. Tech publications and blogs produce countless articles searching for the “killer app” for the iPhone, the Cloud, Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence, and of course, IoT. We’ve also even seen the same hype for development processes. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard that Agile is that silver bullet. Or maybe it was Lean, or Kanban? Hard to keep track. But as a Product Manager, we can’t keep chasing the next big thing all the time. It’s true we need to understand where technology is going, but we need to be more pragmatic and realize there is no single “killer app” for anything. Particularly for IoT.

Universal Gateway – Solution to enable IoT in Building Automation

Posted by Mohit Bhardwaj 

Connecting smart buildings to smart grid, smart transportation, & other smart services is the need of the hour to truly manifest the potential of IoT. However, communicating with numerous systems made up of different protocols is a major challenge faced by integrators. Protocol converters are widely used to convert protocol A to B, but such devices do not offer ease of configuration and flexibility demanded by IoT. The solution to this is a universal gateway – a device that transacts data between two or more data sources using communication protocols specific to each of them. The Universal gateway is also termed as a universal protocol gateway. Such products include a combination of hardware & software, and used to connect data from one automation system like building automation to another like a smart grid.

Photo Credit: Markus Spiske 


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Embedded Software is Eating the World

Software is eating the world wrote Marc Andreessen in The Wall Street Journal on August 20, 2011. Since that time every company in the world has beefed up their software teams and their digital transformation initiatives. Afterall, software is a key competitive advantage, and to survival. 

In the IoT space, we often think about the application software that power industrial systems and consumer connected devices. But what about the embedded software written to control machines or devices that are not typically thought of as computers? This is almost everything, from a small digital watch, e-bikes, electronic control units in cars, microwaves and missile guidance systems.

For insight we turned to Jeffrey Fortin, Head of Product Management, Vector Software. Vector provides automated test tools for embedded software applications in automotive, aerospace, medical devices, industrial controls, rail, and other business critical sectors.

Much of the discussion about software development has centered on mainstream brick-and-mortar companies becoming software companies. They need to be able to compete on software against FAANG (Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google). But this often means competing with better consumer facing applications. Vector focuses on embedded software. What’s at stake for embedded organizations here?

With companies such as Facebook and Apple becoming such a part of our everyday lives, consumers have grown so accustomed to the ease-of-use that these types of companies bring to market in their products. As IoT grows and brick-and-mortar companies are also becoming software companies, this type of user experience has become top of mind, and something that’s now expected by consumers. However, the underlying embedded software within these devices can easily be lost sight of while putting such a big focus on the user experience aspect. 

If an organization was responsible for a safety-critical device that did not previously have software, but now does, organizations must remember that it still has to meet the same safety requirements as before. Just because software has just now been integrated in the product and the organization wants to improve the UX, that does not mean that the safety of the device can be compromised. The quality of the embedded software must be the fundamental focus to ensure consumers are not put at risk.

We all know now that software is eating the world. If you are a manufacturer of electronic devices, but software development is not your core, what do you say to them?

As IoT continues to grow and evolve, there will be new vendors providing applications, middleware, and connected devices to support the thriving ecosystem. This essentially means that many electronic device manufacturers will also now be in the software business.

The problem is that many of these vendors will be new to building embedded software/robust software. This creates an increased importance on software quality, particularly when safety- or performance-critical applications become increasingly dependent on products controlled by software. In these situations, where safety, security or human life is exposed to risk if software fails, I would reiterate to these manufacturers that quality has to be the central focus of software development efforts.

In the IoT ecosystem, a lot of “consumer-grade” software will also find its way onto critical paths in new safety- or performance-critical applications, in large part due to the re-use of legacy code bases. Legacy code often carries an enormous amount of technical debt. Without proper software quality methods in place to ensure the integrity of legacy code, the overall safety of the system could be compromised. 

In summary, quality cannot be installed at the end. Organizations will need to adopt development processes to verify the integrity level of the software is in line with the safety risks of the application.

When it comes to IIoT, what are the trends you are seeing in embedded software and is there a major transition happening in terms of development, testing and quality?

One of the trends I have observed with the growth of IIoT is that product delivery has been flipped. In a traditional model, a product was delivered and remained static. With IoT/IIoT, products are now continuously updated and re-purposed for new functionality or for new business models. With change comes risk, including loss of quality -- and that can put safety at stake, particularly within industrial applications.

Due to this change, there has been a major transition in the way that organizations approach development and testing. For example, many have adopted processes that dramatically improve quality, including software development methodologies such as Change-Based Testing, Continuous Integration and Regression Testing.

Furthermore, as the number of products becoming software-defined grows, software integrity directly relates to brand value. Likewise, as products migrate from consumer-grade use cases to be integrated into mission-critical applications, the quality of the software will determine the value delivered by the products. The chance that faulty software will cause a system failure is now a much greater risk and can result in devastating consequences that not only bring business processes to a halt, but may also harm a company’s reputation. 

As a result, software quality has become an increasingly critical concern in the IoT environment.

Which languages are leading IoT development and what do you recommend to clients?

IoT often leverages scripting languages such as JavaScript, Lua and Node.js. But these languages usually run in conjunction with system software that control the device. The system software is usually written in C or C++. System software forms the foundation for the device and is often required to meet regulatory standards for safety integrity. Our clients who develop this type of software often use C, C++ and also Ada.

The embedded design is key to addressing the need for more secure products in an IoT-enabled world. What are your thoughts on how we make IoT more secure?

With IoT applications, safety can become an issue when security is compromised because these applications power safety-critical products such as automobiles, manufacturing equipment, medical devices and more. Developing secure applications requires constant vigilance in all stages of development. To do so, tools that are capable of detecting possible vulnerabilities when writing code, integrating modules and testing compiled binaries on target hardware should be used.

A commonly used tool for testing software is static application security testing (SAST), which analyzes large amounts of code for common vulnerabilities that could lead to potential security risks. SAST does not execute code, but instead tries to understand what the code is doing behind the scenes to identify errors. However, SAST has been plagued by false-positives, where vulnerabilities are reported but they do not actually exist. Instead, dynamic testing methods can be used to expose security defects in software by confirming exploitability. In this approach, automated software testing methods are used to interrogate an application’s software code and identify possible weaknesses. Once this is complete, a test exploiting the identified issue is generated and executed. After execution, test tools can analyze the execution trace and decide if the potential weakness is actually a genuine threat.

What is your biggest concern when it comes to the Industrial Internet of Things?

The Industrial Internet of Things comprises applications in medical devices, automobiles, avionics, heavy machinery and more. In all of these examples, the quality of the embedded software is under tight scrutiny as safety, security or human life is exposed to risk if the software fails. 

Code correctness forms the basis of a trusted computing platform, and that’s what we at Vector Software are focused on. Every development team needs a comprehensive process in place to achieve application security goals and ensure code correctness before a product goes to market. Our VectorCAST platform provides automated software testing tools that enable the implementation of a complete and automated test infrastructure to ensure improved code quality.

Interoperability testing and protocols are a major part of ensuring that IoT products work. Beyond interoperability, what do you see as the next steps?

At Vector Software, rather than simply testing for interoperability, our focus really lies on integrity testing. In any IoT device, especially in IIoT where safety is a top priority, it is important that the device is not only interoperable with other devices, but it is even more so important to ensure that the software powering these devices is implemented correctly, without fail.

Integrity testing ensures that the code coverage and overall quality of the software itself meet the required safety standards in place. If the software in a car sends a canned message to turn the headlights on, do they actually turn on? Integrity testing ensures that the software is implemented correctly and without errors so that the IoT-enabled device works every time. By doing so, safety is not at risk, and the devices we use in our daily lives can be relied upon. 

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An Inconvenient Truth

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here.  

Security in the Internet of Things - an Inconvenient Truth

Posted by Rob Dyke 

The current political events in Barcelona provide us with a barely-needed reminder that we live in changing times.  I was in the city as part of the Trustonic team exhibiting at IoT Solutions World Congress last week and took some time to speak with fellow vendors. I soon saw some fantastic product demonstrations that drew my attention - I wanted to learn more. Frequently though, the response to: “This looks great - how is it secured? How do we know the data is trustworthy?” was a puzzled look and a “It uses our cloud and we secure that” or “It runs on a secure OS”.  Sometimes the response was worse: “It’s a closed network. You couldn’t attack it”.

IoT is Not Just IT - Focus on Customer Outcomes and Integrated Teams

Posted by Michael Riemer 

Are your IoT initiatives doomed for failure? A recent study by Cisco suggests that 75% of IoT initiatives will fail. But with an estimated 80+ billion connected devices over the next half century, companies cannot afford to ignore the opportunity. Based on learnings from both wins and losses over the last 10 years, an integrated, customer-centric approach will help ensure smarter and more successful IoT investments. Here is a 5-step approach to consider:

Rise of the Intelligent Revenue Machines

Posted by James Branigan 

An early theme of digital transformation was the notion of selling services rather than products. A contract with the “thing maker” to circulate cooling fluid throughout my factory rather than a purchase order for me to buy the pumps and filters needed to do it myself, for example. The contract lets me focus on creating products for my customers rather than maintaining the machines making this possible. I don’t want to spend time on the process (pumps and filters), I just need the outcome (properly cooled machines) in the least distracting way possible to my core business of producing goods, medicine, energy, etc. The contract lets you, purveyor of the connected pumps and filters, build a closer relationship with me, streamline your business, and avoid competing in an increasingly commoditized space.

Customers Want Better Outcomes, not Smarter Products

Posted by James Branigan 

To paraphrase Geoffrey Moore, smart “thing makers” are investing in IoT solutions for their customers today in order to generate more revenue for themselves tomorrow. Traditional hardware vendors are being commoditized and replaced whenever a cheaper “good enough” option comes along. To thrive in the long run, your value must be “sticky”, embedded in your customer’s business, providing benefit to their customers as well. The “things” you sell now simply enable your customers to run their basic operations. Whenever a part breaks, customers make a decision to order a new one either from you or a competitor. How differentiated is your equipment from the rest of the market? Your business is constantly at risk.

How Robotic Process Automation helping Digital Age

Posted by Sandeep Raut  

Digital has brought in so many technological advances to this age and one of them is Robotic Process Automation (RPA). A simple definition of RPA is, automation of business processes across the enterprise using software robots. Any repetitive task which requires some decision making is an ideal candidate for RPA. Automation has become an integral part of Digital Transformation. Implementing these software robots to perform routine business processes and eliminate inefficiencies is the key for business leaders.

 


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The manufacturing industry is undergoing many changes. Those specializing in traditional manufacturing are finding it difficult to keep up with the changes. Perhaps the biggest change has been how traditional manufacturing has come under pressure to manage vast amounts of data captured from different sources. Here are some of the reasons the Internet of Things (IoT) can help.

1. KEEPING AN EYE ON SUPPLIERS

Quality control has become easier because IoT helps keep an eye on suppliers. This makes for easier manufacturing processes. Keeping an eye on suppliers is all about looking at all the constituents that the supplier offers. Capturing data about these constituents through IoT helps make for faster data processing and better quality control.

2. MORE PRODUCTIVITY

Thanks to IoT, many manufacturers are now building self-correcting systems. Missing parts are replaced and parts are replenished, giving rise to greater productivity. Since manufacturing industries are looking in particular for ways to boost productivity, there is no way for them to overlook what IoT can do for them. In addition to greater productivity, there is also more convenience since the need for human labor reduces.

3. MAINTAINING SUPPLY LINES

The Internet of Things is expected to help manufacturers stick to lean manufacturing while at the same time helping maintain supply lines. Since lean manufacturing often requires smart management of the supply lines – to ensure that components are never in short supply but there is no overstock – IoT is expected to help resolve many problems. It will help ensure that suppliers located in different regions can be kept in the loop and supply lines can be managed smoothly so that there is no shortage. It will also help reduce waste and optimize the use of resources.

4. UNINTERRUPTED MANUFACTURING PROCESS

Usually, manufacturing is divided into many processes, from sourcing of raw materials to production, transportation and reaching the customer. However, with the Internet of Things, experts envision something extra. The entire process will be smooth and effective. The raw materials will be already marked for production, intended to reach a particular buyer. This is how experts see things play out as IoT advances to new levels.

5. REDUCED COST

As IoT gains more efficiency, manufacturers can expect to see lowered costs. This is one of the primary reasons manufacturing experts are enthusiastic about the role of IoT. It will become easier to track information about products and processes and more automation would help bring about greater efficiency, thus eventually reducing costs. Lowered costs are expected to boost profit margins. If your manufacturing plant has not invested in IoT yet, this might be the right time to start.

6. LAUNCH NEW PRODUCTS

With IoT, studying needs and launching new products becomes easier. There is less jostle and inefficiency than traditional systems. Manufacturing is thus one of the key areas where you can expect a lot of improvement, thanks to the Internet of Things.

7. INTEGRATING OFFLINE AND ONLINE PROCESSES

Traditionally data and manufacturing have been treated as separate entities. However, in manufacturing industries where IoT advances, this is expected to change. As products begin to carry information about them, it becomes easier to assign a processing and logistics path to them. This is why it becomes critical to involve IoT in your manufacturing plant.

8. CONNECTED TO THE CONSUMER

Products are, in the end, manufactured to suit the consumer. Thanks to IoT, it becomes easier to stay connected to the consumer and create products that match their requirements. This offers two-way benefits, as the consumer gets the best products and the manufacturing plant is able to manufacture products per exact specification. There are a lot of benefits that manufacturers can expect in the long term, thanks to the Internet of Things.As manufacturing processes undergo change, it becomes imperative for manufacturers to make the most of the coming revolution. Supply chains and logistics will become smoother thanks to the industrial Internet of Things. According to many experts, we are at the cusp of another major revolution that will change not only how things are manufactured but also the market economy. It is a good idea to be prepared for these changes by investing in the right IoT system.

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IoT Business Models, Edge and Transportation

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here.  

5 IoT-based Business Models to Leverage

Posted by Mehul Nayak 

The deployment of the Internet of Things (IoT) has disrupted niche organizations across multiple industries like financial services, technology, agricultural equipment etc. The organizations are shifting from traditional products to smart offerings and outcome-based deliverables. This article eplores 5-IoT based business models. 

Why Edge Computing Is an IIoT Requirement

Posted by Steven Martin

To jump-start the productivity engine of IIoT, real-time response is needed at the machine-level at scale and that requires an edge-plus-cloud architecture designed specifically for the Industrial Internet. From Google maps to weather apps, we’ve been experiencing the benefits of cloud and edge computing working together in our daily lives for quite some time. But, what is edge?

Internet of Things (IoT) and Urban Transportation

Posted by Rajashree Rao

According to United Nations, the World population is projected to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, while the share of urban population in the total population will grow from 50% to 70% and this development will increase the demand for global and individual mobility. Many countries in the world are witnessing a unique period of rapid growth in the demographics, economic, and urbanization. Today, more than 60% of the world's population lives in the urban areas, which is continuing to grow significantly. This article is a look at IoT’s role in transportation.

Connected Cars: From the Edge to the Cloud

Posted by David Oro 

Many of us have yet to see an autonomous vehicle driving down the road, but it will be here faster than we can image. The car of tomorrow is connected, data-rich and autonomous. As 5G networks come online, sensors improve and compute and memory become faster and cheaper, the amount of data a vehicle will generate is expected to be 40 terabytes of data every day. This will make the autonomous vehicle the ultimate edge computing device.

Discover The Best Selection Criteria To Choose Your IoT Platform

Posted by Ashish Trikha

Your IoT platform is the heart of your entire IoT solution. Building a reliable and scalable IoT platform is not a piece of cake, which is why these days the market is booming with hundreds of thousands of IoT PaaS (Platform as a Service) vendors. Choosing the right IoT platform for your solution has become more complex than it was ever before. That’s why, in this blog post we have covered some of the best selection criteria to pick the right IoT cloud platform for your needs.

 


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Internet of Things (IoT) and Urban Transportation, to create a world-class Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) which is Safe, Secure, and Sustainable the industry has first to determine the right technologies which they should invest in, as it will be integral in shaping the future of Transportation and Digitize the human existence.
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Interview: 5G, IoT and Hurricanes

Last week more than 21,000 visitors from 110 countries and territories attended the 2017 Mobile World Congress Americas in San Francisco. It was the first for MWC in the United States, having recently gone into a partnership with CTIA to up the appeal of the long-time wireless tradeshow. We were introduced to Advanced RF Technologies (ADRF) and discussed the the transition to 5G, IoT and hurricanes with ADRF Chief Operating Officer Arnold Kim. 

For our readers who are not familiar with your company, tell us about ADRF?

Advanced RF Technologies (ADRF) is a Top 5 Distributed Antenna System (DAS) provider. We've been operating for more than 18 years and provide in-building wireless connectivity solutions to improve cellular signal and data speeds when there is either a lot of people in one area, or the building infrastructure doesn't allow frequencies to enter unobstructed from the macro network. Our products include DAS, small cells, antennas and passive components.

What industries are adopting your technology?

Every industry needs better connectivity inside of their buildings, so we have clients from many different verticals. We work with all four major carriers (Sprint, Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile) and our products are currently in most of the Fortune 100 company buildings, many high profile sports stadiums, commercial real estate, healthcare, and more. We also do plenty of Public Safety installations. 

Device types continue to proliferate - no longer is it a type of mobile phone. How do you advise customers on what types of frequencies and standards to implement?

Most companies have an understanding of what their connectivity needs are. However our approach is to offer flexible and future-proof solutions that will grow with our clients. We try to ensure that our clients will never need to do a full refresh on their investment.

From a connectivity perspective, what are some of the near term challenges for IoT?

The biggest challenges we see regarding the IoT has to do with the sheer volume of devices taking a bandwidth on a network. If you think about a sports stadium and trying to connect 50,000 people, network density quickly becomes a challenge. For large enterprises the number of devices connected and the challenges can be just as large. There's a wide range of devices that will be connected that don't necessarily need a 5G connection. For instance, a connected oil pipe simply needs to send signal that things are working correctly or not. This can be accomplished using a 3G signal, on a low frequency band (which travels more effectively that a 5G signal on a high band might). In areas where the is limited connectivity, this is an important thing to consider.

It’s still early days, but how are you tackling the transition from 4G to 5G?

While the definition of 5G has yet to be settled, we are prepared for it, and those who have our systems in place will be too. Our new ADX V series DAS is modular and works with every type of frequency. When 5G becomes standard, whatever frequency may be adopted by each carrier to run the signal will be compatible with our equipment. At MWC America, we are announcing new Head End and Remote Modules for ADX V to support 600 MHz, the frequency that T-mobile plans to use exclusively for 5G. Not many DAS solutions today support it.

Let’s turn our attention to current events. Hurricane Harvey and the floods it caused in Houston. What role does ADRF play in public safety and how do you support response teams when critical infrastructure comes down?

ADRF performs a lot of public safety installations and we were one of the first companies to be FirstNet compliant. As an example, we recently installed two public safety DAS in the new Atlanta Braves stadium. Dense areas and public venues are mostly required by law to have complete, uninterrupted connection at all times. We provide the systems that allow for that. We have also introduced a series of mobile repeaters that can be implemented in crisis situations as well as outdoor venues where concerts are taking place.

Another example is Hurricane Sandy, a Category 3 major hurricane which affected coastal Mid-Atlantic states in 2012.Verizon deployed CROW (Cellular Repeater on Wheels) help provide interim emergency communications. CROWs are low cost, portable, over the air (which doesn’t requires backhaul) and can be used to provide expanded cellular network coverage or capacity. 

What's the most interesting implementation you've done? Why?

We were selected to make the happiest place on earth one of the best connected. Around Disney World parks, we put in a series of repeaters to provide better coverage and let families share their adventures. One of the important parts of the installation, especially in crowded venues where aesthetic is of the utmost importance, is to make sure equipment is concealed and hidden. Locating those areas when thousands of people are walking the entirety of the park every single day was a challenge.

Anything else you’d like to add?

We announced a new high power outdoor modular repeater at Mobile World Congress Americas, and while it’s intended purpose is to improve cellular connection in outdoor areas, it will be beneficial for IoT connectivity as more people become reliant on having these connections everywhere. Our products support every frequency including those that will be used for 5G, and the 3G and 4G that powers IoT connections. The importance of having blanket coverage for IoT cannot be understated, especially as more important devices become connected in the future.

 

 

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Digital Twins, Intranet of Things and AI

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute your thoughts on IoT here.  

The Digital Twin: Key Component of IoT

Posted by Finbar Gallagher 

What is a Digital Twin and why do I care? A Digital Twin uses data from sensors installed on physical systems to represent their near real-time status, working condition or position. This modelling technology allows us to see what is happening inside the system without having to be able to get inside the system. It forms a critical step in the information value chain without which it is often impossible to get from raw data to insight, and therefore to value. As the Internet of Things grows, Digital Twins will become a standard tool for Data Scientists and Engineers wishing to use all this new data to automatically understand and respond to what is going on in the real world.

Best Platforms for IoT Development

Posted by Blake Davies

The fact is, two years ago we were surrounded by more than 15 billion connected devices; in three years from now, we are bound to see this number reach 30 billion, and 75 billion by 2025. Actually, if we were to believe Ericsson, next year there will be more IoT gadgets than mobile devices.

The truth is, we are finding it difficult to define what is an IoT device. With more and more people driving their connected cars and parking them in front of their smart homes, it is evident this market is only going to progress; and it is all happening at a rapid pace. And what are the platforms that are contributing to this extreme development?

Intranet of Things

Posted by Rajashree Rao 

Intranet of Things is a term coined by Airbus' Carlo Nizam, which refers to connecting the organization's assets. Intranet of things is an alternative model to Internet of Things, and both use the same kind of technologies and systems limiting the accessibility of connected things only to the virtual private network (VPN) or to the corporate network.

Security Issues To Expect In Mobile App Development

Posted by Melissa Crooks

Every week, thousands of new apps are seen hitting the mobile market. Unfortunately, the number of hackers working assiduously to tap into these apps to implant malware or phish for user information has also been on the increase. By implication, there is every need to take the security of mobile users very seriously particularly when it comes to app development.

How machine learning APIs are impacting businesses?

Posted by Sandeep raut 

In this Digital age, every organization is trying to apply machine learning and artificial intelligence to their internal and external data to get actionable insights which will help them to be closer to today’s customer. Today many of the organizations are using APIs to access the ready-made algorithms available in the market as they make it easy to develop predictive applications. In fact, you don’t even need to have an in-depth knowledge of coding or computer science to introduce them into your apps.


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Woman 2.0, IoT 4.0 and more

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Don’t forget, encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute here

IoT - Macro Convergence and Emergence of Markets

Posted by Ram Sangireddy 

In a prior article, we talked about IoT being the connection of the physical and the digital worlds. That is, connecting those things that were physical in nature hitherto and now find a need to be connected to the digital world. The enterprises across consumer, commercial, public, and industrial sectors that were born in the pre-Internet era (Honeywell, ABB, GE, Philips, Siemens, and so on) are making moves to position themselves as digitally transformed companies. More subtle are the moves being made by the Internet era companies (Google, Amazon, etc.) to integrate themselves with the physical world. There are a number of plays across IoT market that numerous enterprises see the opportunity to position themselves

Internet of Things and Smart Woman 2.0

Posted by Rajashree Rao

A woman is a unique creature. Right from her physiology to her mental makeup - her extraordinary capability is to reproduce, and this makes her vulnerable both physically and mentally. A woman faces a lot more sexism or inequality than a man too often. This makes it difficult for her to find the right balance in her world both at home and work. A woman dons several roles and must fit many shoes her entire life. Right from managing her career, family, children, home, and you name it the list is never ending. Given the power of IoT, maybe it is time to find use of this technology in helping this multi-faceted individual manage her life, making it easier for her to live. How will IoT ensure the safety and security of a woman right from her place of work to home? Are there some answers? 

How long will we have to wait for Internet of Things 4.0 ?

Posted by Francisco Maroto

I have not intended to abuse of one more time of a shocking headline in IoT but the fact is that per Gartner´s 2016 Hype Curve” the Internet of Things (IoT) had falling into the dreaded Trough of Disillusionment and the Powerful analyst firm decided to not mention IoT anymore in 2017. Also, corroborated for many pessimistic articles of IoT project failures .  So it is our responsibility as IoT influencers to continue evangelizing about how the “The Internet of Things will Change our World”.

Keeping Voice-Activated Smart Home Device From Talking to the Wrong People

Posted by Jeff Finn

The introduction of voice-activated smart home solutions – like Amazon Echo and Dot, Google Home, and Apple’s HomePod – have brought with them the dream of convenient Star Trek-like interfaces where a user’s spoken wish is their command. But at the same time, these devices have served as a Trojan Horse, increasingly inviting in security issues and unintended consequences. The greatest security vulnerabilities created by these products are due to the fact that, while they prominently feature advanced voice recognition, they cannot really tell who’s talking. The dangers this presents are compounded when the devices feature the ability to make purchases (with few safeguards under default settings), as well as control smart home features (lights, thermostats, locks, etc.) that users do not want malicious actors to be able to manipulate.

IoT: Penetrating the Possibilities of a Data Driven Economy

By Ronald van Loon

Ever since the Internet of Things (IoT) manifested into reality, integrating the physical world with our digital routine, experts and thought leaders have waited for it to transform the dream of a data driven economy into a witnessed possibility.

As the concept of Internet of Things continues to evolve and grow, it now appears that the wait is finally over.  Welcome to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). This is a concept-turned-reality, which looks set to change the traditional picture of industrial production for years to come. 

20 Job Interview Questions for IoT Professionals

Posted by David Oro 

Bill McCabe knows everyone. He has to. He’s a thought leader in IoT, with a particular focus on recruiting. He’s authored dozens of articles on all things IoT and recruitment, and has placed a number of IoT professionals at organizations big and small. We wanted to know in particular, for the IoT job seeker, what are the top 20 questions they should be prepared to answer in their interview. Here is what Bill shared.



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“In memory of my brother Juan”

I have not intended to abuse of one more time of a shocking headline in IoT but the fact is that per Gartner´s 2016 Hype Curve” the Internet of Things (IoT) had falling into the dreaded Trough of Disillusionment and the Powerful analyst firm decided to not mention IoT anymore in 2017. Also, corroborated for many pessimistic articles of IoT project failures .

So it is our responsibility as IoT influencers to continue evangelizing about how the “The Internet of Things will Change our World”.

In the article “The Internet of Things… Are We There Yet?” , Cees Links points out that “The IoT is suffering today from a lack of understanding of its true value proposition and even if we are currently in the Valley of Disillusionment, we should not be distracted. We still have a lot to learn but we are in the middle of shaping a better world for the next generation”.

IoT 1.0 or the time of the Systems

It seems prehistoric. I'm talking about the world of Telemetry, Machine to Machine, Industrial Control Systems (PLCs, SCADAs, HMI,..) . But IoT 1.0 is still the one that holds the largest number of devices connected so far. Simple solutions for departmental, very controlled business needs, designed without security as a priority and not easy to integrate and of course with the objective of create new business models.

One interesting outgrowth was the emergence of the “IoT engineer” version 1.0. This was an embedded engineer, cloud SW developer, mobile app developer, or networking specialist that has gained knowledge and skills in one or more of the other disciplines within IoT.

IoT 2.0 or the time of the Platforms

Scott Nelson and Paul Metaxatos published an article in Harvard Business Review on the importance of design in creating value in the next phase of the Internet of things (IoT). IoT 2.0 was the natural next step in the technology adoption curve and brought in a new wave of IoT-facilitated solutions that still have not demonstrated a higher rate of adoption and return on investment.

Many companies have been able to check during the last three years that IoT projects are complex and adoption of the technology can be harder because of the lack of standards, security issues and competitive and fragmented nature of the IoT ecosystem.

See below a list of characteristics and judge yourself what still missing to overcome IoT2.0:

IoT 2.0

  • Standards are respected
  • Separation of content and design
  • Machine Content syndication
  • A simple programming language for non-intelligent machines
  • A programming language for intelligent machines
  • Network of Social Machines
  • Machines responsible for the management and security of its information
  • Hierarchy of Machines (APIs)
  • Search Engine - Facilitate positioning with specific URLs for machines

In Design Elements for the Internet of Things 2.0 you will find some design elements that had been introduced to actually make things intelligent and not just “Smart.”

But above all,  the IoT 2.0 has been a mediatic pulse between IoT Platforms and Artificial Intelligence.

New breed of IoT 2.0 engineers, vendors, product managers, developers, analysts,… are stripping the daisy. Take a look at  “IoT Generalist vs IoT Specialist, Who will survive to the era of Robots? “  if you did not read yet.

IoT 3.0 or the time of Business Optimization

In Salesforce blog, we can find some of the IoT 1.0 and 2.0 limitations. The writer of the article indicates: “Much of the IoT technology available today does not make it easy to add value or generate ROI. To date, most IoT technology has been focused on networking devices together (IoT 1.0) or analyzing data that is streaming from those networked devices (IoT 2.0).
Both IoT 1.0 and IoT 2.0 are critical for a business to succeed in the connected world, because they provide the foundational layer for how a business collects and analyze their data. However, to provide true returns on IoT investment you have to be able to connect all of those analyzed and networked devices back to business value
. “

For Salesforce obviously, the IoT 3.0 - is related with “The connected customer experience. But the focus on almost every company working with IoT today is how its use IoT data to improve business processes or change business models.

By enriching device/objects data in near real time with context data, companies have a very powerful set of data from which they can build business rules to generate actions and measurable outcomes.  Many examples of highly interesting rules could be created with this new rich data set.

Also in  “Internet of Things 3.0 scaled by Robotic Process Automation (RPA)”  the author explain how The Internet of Things and RPA can function together and examine the ways in which RPA and the Internet of Things can foster collaborative, efficient business processes.

IoT 3.0 is the bridge from things to humans, whether they be your customers, partners, suppliers, or employees to drive measurable outcomes and ROI.

IoT 4.0 or the time of the Social IoT

We have seen how the different stages of IoT have been providing an increasing degree of intelligence to the machines. The technology allowed move enterprises from an experience that consisted of a simple monitoring and remote control of machines to an integration of the outcomes of these machines into enterprise processes  that has allow create new business models.

IoT 4.0, which is already emerging, will add machine learning and artificial capabilities to the value chain to make experiences truly seamless and part of everyday life.

The sheer volume of data from IOT 3.0 will be a rich source to really power IoT 4.0, using AI to make the connected chain truly intelligent.

Most of the robots, machines, equipment, devices and countless objects that have been designed, built and sold to the heat of the IoT have focused the functional and technical requirements in reducing the costs of connectivity, increase battery life, provide end security (here not so much) and usability, but not in the capacity of self-learning or provide artificial intelligence.

But this time will be soon over, and intelligent machines (I am not thinking in 50 billion simple devices) but millions of let call by now “Any kind of purpose Robots or AKPR“ will be a reality, And these AKP Robots will need their own social networks.

The fear of intelligent machines persists in our collective memory and companies like Facebook forced to shut down it AI project after it invents its own language they couldn’t understand.! But we can not stop evolution and AKPR Robots are the next step in the evolution of Industrial or home robots.

I'm not the only one thinking about social machines. The Social Internet of Things (SIoT) organization has defined SIOT as an IoT where things are capable of establishing social relationships with other objects, autonomously with respect to humans.

The objectives being pursued by the Social Internet of Things (SIoT) paradigm are clear: to keep separate the two levels of people and things; to allow objects to have their own social networks; to allow humans to impose rules to protect their privacy and only access the result of autonomous inter-object interactions occurring on the objects’ social network.
In their vision, smart objects (even though extremely intelligent) will not make a difference, but social objects will make it!

Only when we decide to turn Smart Objects into Social Objects the Internet of Things will boost its economic and social value

The Internet of Things IoT 4.0 or Social Internet of Things need agnostic networks and protocols that guarantee performance, scalability or security. The Social Objects must be able to interoperate among the IoT Cloud Platforms.

There is no doubt that many applications and services should in the future be associated with groups of objects, whose individuality will be 'sacrificed' to the overall interest of providing services to users.

We need to think in new scenarios where interactions among social objects assume the shape of social interactions that mimic the four "elementary relational models" observed in human behaviour.

It will not be easy to reach the IoT 4.0 level. The interests of corporations, governments inefficiencies, lack of citizen preparation and other short-term factors to which our society is subjected will delay the adoption of the Social Internet of Things.

Key Takeaways

We are very far of IoT 4.0. Today most objects are unconnected, only a few connected objects are intelligent, enterprises continue working on silos, governments services are inefficient, interoperability is a chimera, robots do not have their protocols and social networks, humans are still limiting the promises of IoT.

The Internet of Things promises to be a source of great benefits to our lives but it will definitely take more time than expected.

Only when we decide to turn Smart Objects into Social Objects the Internet of Things will boost its economic and social value.

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Interview: The Rise of LoRa

Last week I had the pleasure of speaking with Vivek Mohan, director for Semtech’s Wireless and Sensing Products Group. I originally inquired about a piece I was working on around IoT and agriculture. (I love stories about IoT and agriculture. We have several takes on it here, here and here.) Turns out they had an announcement with Chipsafer whereby cattle tags now allow ranchers to monitor vital signs and reduce cattle theft. While we discussed innovations in ranching, we also talked about the rapid growth of LoRA, a long range, low power wireless platform for building IoT networks.

LoRa has gone from inception in 2013 to over 500 members in the LoRa Alliance in 2017. What is driving so much interest in LoRa?

Clearly there was a market need for a disruptive technology, such as Semtech’s LoRa® devices and radio frequency technology (LoRa Technology), guided by a collaborative, open industry alliance which was not being addressed by existing solutions. LoRa Technology’s feature set allows for expansion and adoption at a price point that works for most consumers, be it a cattle rancher in Brazil or a shipping giant in the United States. LoRa Technology covers a wide area, requires little to no maintenance, costs less to deploy, and costs less to maintain in service.

Before LoRa, what options were there for companies and what are the other options today?

Before LoRa, the main options were Bluetooth, WiFi and cellular networks and many proprietary implementations. Those technologies don’t work best for the growth of IoT anymore and certainly don’t address LPWAN the way that LoRa does, given their network and cost limitations. LoRa Technology’s purpose is to drive the growth of IoT by making devices with a powerful feature set, making it easy to deploy and is financially viable to benefit consumers and manufacturers.

What sectors are best suited for LoRa?

LoRa Technology has many applications, including supply chain & logistics, smart cities, smart buildings and homes, agriculture, metering, environmental safety, and industrial. With its key three features – low-power, low-cost and an open interoperable standard – LoRa is desirable for any industry that want to develop an IoT solution.

You recently announced with Chipsafer that you’ve conducted three pilot programs for its cattle management solutions in Namibia, Kenya, and Luxembourg. What was that all about?

Chipsafer used LoRa-enabled devices to tag cattle to monitor their location and vital signs, and used LoRaWAN-based gateways to create a network for the ranchers. Chipsafer was able to bring IoT and valuable data to ranchers in remote locations. Chipsafer is now expanding its pilot program to Brazil and Uruguay, as well as other locations around the globe. This has a lot of practical benefits previously not available to cattle ranchers around the world and improves quality and safety for consumers.

What’s next for the LoRa standard?

The LoRa Alliance membership is growing and LoRaWAN networks are expanding constantly. Actility and LORIOT were part of LoRaWAN network expansions in China and Mexico, respectively. The LoRaWan standard gives users, developers and businesses freedom to use IoT in the ways that they need. 

What do you think the most pressing challenges are when it comes to IoT?

The most pressing challenges for IoT are: interoperability of various networks as the market is still fragmented with many technology platforms, security for billions of sensors and the data they produce, providing carrier grade quality, and reliability at consumer price points as these sensors will last for multiple years and in some cases may be hard to reach/replace. These challenges are tied together because adoption will slow down if IoT options are not available at accessible prices, and the devices will not be economically-feasible if there is little adoption. This is why the LoRa Alliance is so important; we are more than 500 members developing devices, technologies and applications under the same set of guidelines, with the same purpose of making the Internet of Things possible.

What excites you most about the future of IoT? Any examples you can give of applications LoRa will enable in the near future?

It is the seemingly endless number of applications people are finding for IoT. IoT is modernizing industries that were in dire need of an update, and promoting the importance of data intelligence across all sectors. More and more devices and applications come out every day it seems, and that is very exciting for Semtech to see. In the near future we will see more solutions leveraging artificial intelligence and Cloud computing to realize the full potential of IoT.

Anything else you’d like to add?

Our goal with LoRa is to make IoT accessible to everyone in every sector, and provide the highest quality products and service at a price that makes adoption possible. The LoRa Alliance continues to grow and we are committed to establishing a strong IoT network that our customers can leverage to build cutting-edge IoT applications.

 

*Semtech, the Semtech logo, and LoRa are registered trademarks or service marks, and LoRaWAN is a trademark or service mark, of Semtech Corporation or its affiliates.

 

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SCADA, Clustering, Value and Amara's Law

Here is the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. Don’t forget, encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here. You can contribute here

SCADA vs IoT: the role of SCADA systems in Manufacturing's Industry 4.0

Posted by Samuel Walton

We are all witnesses to the sustained rise of the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and the demand to ‘digitise’ within Industry 4.0. Yet legitimate SCADA-based questions, specifically in relation to IoT appear ignored, or at least unanswered. So we ask, “will IoT replace SCADA?” and “can the two concepts be integrated?” SCADA and Distributed Control Systems (DCS) are clearly prevalent automation standards, but as a new tidal wave of data from the IoT surfaces, what role will they play in the factory of the future? 

The Information Value Chain

Posted by Finbar Gallagher

Several years ago I was pitching what would now be called an Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solution to the Production Manager of a large manufacturing plant. After describing all the data we could collect, and the metrics we could turn it into, I thought I had done pretty well. What Production Manager wouldn't want our system to get his finger on the pulse of his operation? Instead, his next question floored me:"If I don't do anything with the data your system collects, then it doesn't create any value for me, does it?"

The Amara’s Law and the Anatomy of Business Use Cases in IoT

Posted by Somjit Amrit

In the animated discussion, someone asked a quiz question, “What is Amara’s Law?” It turned out that American Scientist Roy Amara came up with an interesting view and an easy to understand law –“While we overestimate the short term effect of technology, we underestimate the long term impact." I feel in the world of IoT this law is fascinatingly relevant.

How Clustering ensures reliability of IoT Gateway

Posted by Mohit Bhardwaj 

IoT gateways may be the unsung heroes of the Internet of Things world. Without them, there would likely be no expectations of tens of billions of IoT devices coming online in the next few years. In many respects, gateways are the glue that holds many IoT implementations together. They enable real-time analysis of IoT data and link multitudinous connected sensors and devices to the cloud. In addition, gateways act as a bridge between various sensor types and connectivity protocols, while helping to link equipment from an organization’s information technology (IT) and operation technology (OT) departments.

But gateways can also be single points of failure in IoT networks. In a poorly designed system, when a gateway goes down, critical functions stop. Preventing that outcome is possible, however, with an IoT gateway architecture based on the idea of clustering



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IoT Central Contributor Francisco Maroto says we are falling into the 'Trough of Disillusionment' but Gartner says we’re at the 'Peak of Inflated Expectations.' What say ye? 

These stories and more are explored in this IoT Central Digest. Don’t forget, encourage your friends and colleagues to be a part of our community. Forward this to them. They can join IoT Central here.

Save IoT, Save The World

Posted by Francisco Maroto 

When looking for a title for this article, I remembered the famous phrase from TV serie Heroes, "Save the cheerleader, Save the world". Sorry if one more time I abuse of shocking headlines to attract more readers. Is the Internet of Thing (IoT) in danger? In light of the latest events I have attended in Berlin and London and news like this "Intel To Amputate Three Modules For Internet Of Things, Including Joule", I really believe  IoT is falling into the Gartner´s Trough of Disillusionment phase  and we need IoT heroes to push it faster towards the Plateau of Productivity phase. The other part of the article's title, "Save the World," may sound pretentious, but the world need to be save. This year hot spring and summer is confirming even the most disbelieving that Global Warming is very real (Read more at " Global Warming, Christmas and the Internet of Things" and in spite I do not consider that only IoT can save our blue planet, per recent events like "Portugal forest fire", IoT can help and much.

IoT Platforms: The Peak of Inflated Expectations

Posted by David Oro

Gartner recently released their 2017 Emerging Technologies Hype Cycle. Where do IoT Platforms stand? At the peak of inflated expectations! Do you agree? Gartner says that the hype cycle reveals three distinct megatrends that will enable businesses to survive and thrive in the digital economy over the next five to 10 years. (See graphic below).

Commercial Application of Predictive Analytics for IoT

Posted by Blake Davies 

In this IoT era, we are provided the opportunity to collect accurate, detailed performance insights from data produced by a multitude of instrumented devices. The Internet of Things is no longer just about using your mobile phone to turn on and off your lighting, heating or oven; owing to the constant technological advancements, we are now seeing benefits in all industries and lines of business. We are using the obtained performance insights to improve the quality of products, their functionality, and reliability. Gone are the days when the IoT was just a vision – these intelligent systems are real; they are connecting things with processes and people and help unlock a multitude of new opportunities.  

Who owns the Machine Generated Data in IoT – Men or Machine?

Posted by Somjit Amrit

The other day we were discussing and debating on a solution to be designed to meet the sensing needs for access, temperature and humidity for some devices with form part of a networking infrastructure ecosystem. The idea was to build a IoT based system for monitoring and control. The design discussions veered around the ability to collect data from the sensors and the types of short range communication protocols which could be deployed. Questions and clarification were raised if we were compliant to use short range communication protocols in sensitive areas as customer Data Centres which are like owned and  that they may be custodians of data of their end customers . The hidden perils of data acquisition and data ownership reared its head which needed to be addressed as we moved forward.

Machine Learning - The brain of Digital Transformation

Posted by Sandeep raut

Organizations are using machine learning for various insights they want to know about consumers, products, vendors and take actions which will help grow the business, increase the consumer satisfaction or decrease the costs. Here are some top use cases for machine learning.

20 Job Interview Questions for IoT Professionals

Posted by David Oro 

Bill McCabe knows everyone. He has to. He’s a thought leader in IoT, with a particular focus on recruiting. He’s authored dozens of articles on all things IoT and recruitment, and has placed a number of IoT professionals at organizations big and small. We wanted to know in particular, for the IoT job seeker, what are the top 20 questions they should be prepared to answer in their interview. Here is what Bill shared.


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All of us are accustomed to the smart wearables, such as the ones we wear on a jogging track. We also have seen the concept of smart homes turn into a reality. We have seen a farmer sort and track his flock of sheep with the help of a mountable RFID device. 

Every physical element around us (including ourselves) have become a part of a real and rhythmic whole – communicating information with each other at all times. All thanks to the Internet of Things!

Ever since the Internet of Things (IoT) manifested into reality, integrating the physical world with our digital routine, experts and thought leaders have waited for it to transform the dream of a data driven economy into a witnessed possibility.

As the concept of Internet of Things continues to evolve and grow, it now appears that the wait is finally over. 

Welcome to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). This is a concept-turned-reality, which looks set to change the traditional picture of industrial production for years to come. 

Industrial Internet of Things – What Is It? 

The Industrial Internet of Things or IIoT, is the Internet of Things, applied in industrial settings, which combines operational technology with information technology to help in the optimization of industrial processes and business models.

The communication protocol is same, objective is same—facilitate information sharing to execute better decision making—it’s just that the platform is industrial, when we talk in reference to IIoT. 

IoT: Inspiring Innovation Initiatives and Fueling the Realization of a Data Driven Economy

Magnifying into the early traces that the IoT is foot-printing in the context of industrial transformation, the innovation initiatives across different industry-level operating lines can be summarized as follows: 

Improved Management Reporting

With manufacturing units now being able to communicate with each other through the deployment of IoT system solutions, analysis of facility performance metrics can be performed in real time. Management executives, if they want, can also resolve the performance monitoring to shop floor levels, which helps provide revealing manufacturing insights. 

This leads to improved management reporting.

Serving as an example is the manufacturing giant, Caterpillar. The company has deployed the SAP Leonardo system, an IIoT technology, across all its operation facilities. The system furnishes real time information about manufacturing data, energy utilization data, machine performances, and data regarding the production consumables. Combining altogether, the company executives can have a 360-degree view of the manufacturing processes which leads to better tactical decision making.  

Improved Operational Efficiencies

For a company, operational efficiency is as important as the production churn. You may have a high production churn, but until or unless your organization is not efficient in its operations, the lack of efficiency will ultimately restrict its growth. IoT has allowed companies to improve its operational efficiency, as information is communicated in real time between different production units. 

This transpires into the optimization of processes to achieve operational efficiency. 

BASF, a leading chemical products manufacturer, is leveraging the implementation of IoT to achieve efficiency in its operations. Via a deployed IoT cloud, manufacturing units communicate their requirements with a production planning department. When production components are planned and bought according to the needed manufacturing units, investment risk is reduced and advanced planning of production cost is made possible. 

Storage facilities communicate with production and supply chain, which helps them to regulate the operations to lower the storage cost, without compromising on customer facilitation. This and much more has allowed BASF to strive for operational excellence. 

Improved Failure-Response Time

The IoT is also opening new possibilities in mitigating the risk of operational failures, and improving failure-response time in cases where operations do break down. This has been made possible as the IoT allows machines to exchange information with each other. Depending on the analysis of the information received, automatically create service requests, schedule maintenance, and ensure timely delivery of spare parts that need to be replaced. 

This keeps the operations going.

Leading the inspiration in this case is Trenitalia, the primary train operator in Italy. The company has deployed a dynamic management system, powered by the Internet of Things and Big Data analysis. The system continually monitors the health of every train component, depending on which it can schedule timely maintenance protocols. This ensures uninterrupted service operations.

Improved Levels of Customers Service

Customer service is another area where the IoT is helping the employees and management executives. The IoT permits end to end of visibility of real time information across all production lines, which helps optimize the asset utilization of critical resources. 

This ensures timely facilitation of customer requests.

The Truck Advisor mobile app, used by Unilever, is a great example in this context. It is a mobile app, which leverages the power of a Cloud Platform, and enables the organization to keep track of its fleet of delivery trucks, without having to get them install an onboard GPS device. 

With the help of the app, the company can track the geo-position of each individual truck, monitor the stops and delivery status, accurately predict expected delivery delays, and establish a bi-level communication with the drivers. With such a vast data set available in real time, the company can strategize in parallel to make sure that deliveries to the customers are on time and meet the pre-set requirements.   

These, by far, are just scratching the surface of possible application scenarios. But they are enough to support the claim that the IoT is penetrating the possibilities of a data driven economy, and establishing a strong foundation for it with new applications and unprecedented results. 

Originally posted on Data Science Central.

About the Author

Ronald van Loon is an Advisory Board Member and Big Data & Analytics course advisor for Simplilearn. He contributes his expertise towards the rapid growth of Simplilearn’s popular Big Data & Analytics category.

If you would like to read more from Ronald van Loon on the possibilities of Big Data and the Internet of Things (IoT), please click “Follow” and connect on LinkedIn and Twitter.

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