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Case Studies (233)

From early visionaries to futuristic applications, the Internet of Things was fueled by raw innovation in connectivity and robotics.

Guest post William Belk. This article originally appeared here.

~1900: Radio Control

~1985: Consumer Cellular Phone

http://mashable.com/2014/03/13/first-cellphone-on-sale/#EUMAjMjMcaqO

~1985: Electronic Toll Collection via Transmitter

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_toll_collection

~2000: WIFI

~2000: RFID Passports

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysian_passport

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LinkedIn currently lists over 4000 jobs related to the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is built on many of the technologies that professionals are already familiar with including Internet Protocol (IP) experts, hardware engineers, and even GUI designers. This is an opportunity for many professionals to transition to new roles and projects directly related to IoT.  

Here are eight articles from long-time IoT Central contributor Bill McCabe that will help you find, recruit and advance your organization and careers in IoT.

How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

5 questions You Should Ask Your IOT Candidates Before Hiring Them

IOT Job Market/ Who is getting hired and Why?

The CIOTO is Your Next Must-Hire Role

The 5 Point Plan for IOT Recruitment

The Great IOT Recruiting Rush

Top Three Skills for Data Security Pros

Internet of Things: Job Killer or Job Creator?

Photo credit: Synapse Wireless

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IoT Central Digest, March 14, 2017

Here's the latest IoT Central Digest. We have cars, some final thoughts on Mobile World Congress, a look at LTE, Bluetooth 5 and a link to the top 100 Industrial IoT companies.  

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT-Connected Car of Today— Cases From Hertz, Nokia, NTT, Mojio & Concur Technologies

Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

Could it Be LTE? Identifying a Standard for the Internet of Things

MWC- The Great Illusionists Show

TOP 100 Industrial IoT Companies Index


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Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

Imagine a world where your car not only drives itself, but also says intelligent things like these:

  • A hotel is just around the corner and you have been driving for eight hours. Would you like to reserve a room and take rest for a couple of hours?
  • You last serviced the brakes twelve months ago and you have driven your car about 20.000 miles in this duration. Would you like me to find a dealer and book an appointment?

This would look like an impossibility about five years ago when the world was unaware of a technology called the Internet of Things (IoT), but today, the IoT is already breaking fresh ground for tech companies and car manufacturers, enabling them to realize their idea of a ‘connected car.’

I recently attended Mobile World Congress (#MWC17) in Barcelona where SAP announced its collaboration with Hertz, Nokia and Concur Technologies. The purpose of this new partnership is to leverage IoT to offer an intelligent, automated experience to car users. SAP also announced its collaboration with Mojio, the connected vehicle platform and app provider for T-Mobile USA and Deutsche Telekom. The integration of Mojio’s cloud computing capabilities with SAP Vehicles Network will make parking and fueling process a breeze for users. From enabling drivers to reserve a parking spot based on calendar events to expense management for business travelers, SAP’s collaboration with these companies is likely to accelerate the development of connected cars. 

In this article, I have discussed the cases that caught my interest and that, in my opinion, are likely to progress and evolve into something revolutionary. 

Mojio — The IoT Connected Car 

Mojio ‘s new smart car technology is set to create an automotive ecosystem that will allow the automotive, insurance, and telecom industry to thrive together. The recent news that Mojio plans to connect 500,000 vehicles to its cloud platform in the first phase gives us a clue about the technology is really taking off and the idea of ‘connected cars’ is likely to become a reality soon. 

Mojio’s Data Analytics Capabilities

The open connected car platform introduced by Mojio has advanced data collection and analytical capabilities. The data collected by the sophisticated telematics device can be categorized into three types — contextual, behavioral, and diagnostic. Using mathematical and statistical modeling, Mojio discovers meaningful patterns and draw conclusions from data to allow companies to better understand the needs, behaviors, and expectations of their customers and drive product and service improvements. 

Here’s how it all works. 

  • Behavioral Data — Mojio’s telematics device gathers information about speed, steering, and braking inputs to determine driver’s fatigue level and issue alerts. Long-term driving behavior data can also be used to help the user adopt a more fuel efficient driving style and calculate risk by insurance companies. 
  • Diagnostic Data — With the ability to access vehicle’s data remotely, car manufacturers can assess the health of a vehicle and combine this capability with in-car voice communication to notify customers when service is required. 
  • Contextual Data — Led by Google and Amazon, contextual targeting of advertisements based on the search data of an individual has become a usual practice in the digital world. Mojio is using the same principle to offer more personalized advice to car drivers. It enriches the behavioral and contextual data of a customer with geolocation data, posted speed limits, and updated traffic flow conditions to provide valuable recommendations to the driver.

Data Sharing Outside the Connected Car Ecosystem 

Mojio has evolved from being a ‘service provider’ to a ‘system integrator’ and it now works with Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and other companies to offer all the services a user may need in an integrated, unfragmented manner. Built on SAP Vehicles Network, the Connected Car Ecosystem introduces users to a new level of convenience and comfort. Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, users can now ask Amazon Alexa questions about their newly connected car, such as "Alexa, ask Mojio how much fuel my car has left."

Future Possibilities: A Value Chain in Flux

Mojio has partnered with a number of companies, including Amazon Alexa, Dooing, IFTTT, FleetLeed, and Spot Angels. The integration of the value chains of these companies will mean improved convenience and better personalized services to customers. While the possibilities are unlimited, I have listed a couple of examples here to help you get an idea of the potential of this technology. 

Logistical providers — Leveraging on the capabilities of this open connected car platform, you can request Amazon/UPS/DHL/FedEx to deliver an order directly to the boot of your car. Amazon will find your car using the geolocation data, enter a security code to open the luggage compartment, and leave your parcel while you’re in a meeting or having your lunch at a restaurant.

IFTTT — The integration of Mojio and IFTTT means that your calendar will be automatically updated based on your travel habits. Not only this, you will be able to set triggers and actions as well, such as:

  • When my vehicle ignition turns on, mute my Android tone. 
  • Track new trips in a Google spreadsheet. 
  • Receive a notification when Mojio senses that my car’s battery is low. 

SpotAngel — Did you know that Mojio could save you money? The partnership of Mojio with SpotAngel will allow you to receive alerts for street cleaning, alternate side parking, or parking meters, helping you avoid parking tickets. 

The possibilities are virtually unlimited. For example, if Mojio partners with a call center, then businesses will be able to get voice recordings of calls made by customers for roadside assistance or directions and use this information to ensure quality control or for CRM. 

Hertz — The Rent-a-Car Company Ready to Use IoT to Improve Its Customer Experience

Hertz is set to become the first car rental company to use the Internet of Things to offer improved services to its customers. It announced its decision to join SAP Vehicles Network in the conference that I recently attended. Being a member of the SAP Vehicles Network, that currently comprises of leading names like Nokia, Concur Technologies, and Mojio, will allow Hertz to elevate the car-rental experience of its customers by providing them personalized advice and services. 

Hertz is likely to integrate travel and itinerary planning along with in-car personalization to deliver just what the client needs. In addition to this, the integration of Concur’s TripLink will be particularly beneficial for business travelers. The app will aggregate all the travel-related expenses, including fuel and parking fees to allow customers to generate a single expense report for the entire trip. Using Concur’s TripLink business travelers will be able to a single click to submit their trip expense report immediately after the trip is completed.

Nokia to Offer Robust, Multi-Layered Security to Connected Cars

Nokia has designed a horizontal solution to address the challenges posed by the fragmented and complex IoT ecosystem that comprises of disparate devices and applications. Titled ‘Intelligent Management Platform for All Connected Things’ (IMPACT), the new solution offers connectivity, data collection, analytics, and business application development capabilities across all verticals. 

Using IMPACT, service providers will be able to assume a competitive position in the market by offering them a number of value-adding options, such as:

  • IMPACT will monitor traffic flow to offer real-time updates to customers. 
  • Personalization of driver settings and entertainment systems. 
  • Remote monitoring of speed, fuel levels, and other metrics for vehicle diagnostics and predictive maintenance. 

Improved Safety with Live Transportation Monitoring 

Apart from Nokia, Hertz, and Mojio, SAP is also working with NTT to devise a state-of-the-art solution that can improve the safety of public transport. The solution, which is called Live Transportation Monitoring, has three components — NTT’s IoT analytics platform, SAP’s connected transportation safety portal, and hitoe® — a fabric that will used to manufacture drivers’ workwear. 

This fabric is coated with a conductive polymer which will help the service provider monitor the driving behavior and key health parameters of drivers from a remote location in a real time manner. The data will be presented on SAP’s connected transportation safety portal (as exhibited in the photo below). This way, public transportation companies will be able to ensure complete safety of their passengers, as well monitor the health of their employees and vehicles. 

Combined, all these technologies have the potential to make the driving experience of customers sager, more convenient, and less costly. Also, since this is a relatively new market, we can expect new players to join hands, gain a foothold, and push the boundaries of what’s possible with IoT.

What do you think of these new developments? Don’t forget to like the article, share your comments and insights. 

If you would like to read Ronald van Loon future posts then please click 'Follow' and feel free to also connect on LinkedIn and Twitter

This post originally appeared here.

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IoT Central Digest, March 6, 2017

We cover a lot of ground in this issue of the IoT Central Digest. Edge, fog, and cloud computing are all touched on by new and returning contributors. We also look at security and blockchain, as well as explore IoT use cases with Visa, Airbus, Bosch and SNCF. 

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here. If you like what you're ready, considering forwarding this to a friend and encourage them to join our community here.

The IoT Architecture at the Edge

This article aims to focus on edge side of IoT Architectures where all things are. The edge is the place where all event data are generated and automated actions occurs, and because that it must be managed and secured. It also includes a wide array of sensors, actuators, and devices which interact and communicate real-time data each other and with cloud services.

Mobile World Congress and the Pain in Spain

Posted by David Oro

As Mobile World Congress kicks off in Barcelona this week, Avast, a security company, has a warning for the citizens of Spain: There are over 5 million vulnerable IoT devices across the country.

The Era of Machine Learning (ML), Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robotics and Internet of Things (IoT) is Here.


Network Error: Challenges to IoT Adoption in Southeast Asia


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18 Articles on IoT and Security

This resource is part of a series of specific topics related to the Internet of Things. To keep receiving these articles, sign up on IoT Central

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Guest post by Evan Birkhead.

A new IDC FutureScape offers top 10 predictions for the Worldwide IoT in 2017.  The research evaluates 10 emerging trends and ranks them in terms of their likely impact across the enterprise and the time it will take each prediction to go mainstream (meaning the middle of bellcurve of adoption). 

We took a close look and found that the list provides an excellent starting point for enterprises – particular industrials - that are steadily getting pulled toward the Industrial Internet and need to learn more.  Let’s break it down.

The diagram shows IDC’s 10 predictions. The size of the bubble provides a rough indicator of the complexity and/or cost that an enterprise will incur when acting on the prediction.  The X axis shows the time until a trend becomes mainstream; the Y axis shows the impact on the enterprise organization, with the upper tier showing company-wide impact.  So, for example, #10 IoT Analytics presents the most costly and complex technology issue for organizations and its departmental impact is limited, so its mainstream acceptance won’t occur for a couple more years.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 1: Open Data Platforms Emerge

By 2018, IDC says the "Open Data Platform" will emerge as the next frontier in platform discussions. We are already seeing this with organizations such as the Industrial Internet Consortium and the OpenFog Consortium, who are specifying open frameworks for IoT computing and communications. While this may cause confusion for early adopters, open platforms will pave the way for mainstream acceptance.

Prediction 2:  LPWAN Conflict

Despite hype on the benefits of Low-Power Wide Area Networks (LoRa, Sigfox, etc.), IDC predicts organizations won’t begin to adopt it for another year due to a lack of QoS – and then only for non-critical applications.  Keep an eye on this space though, as low-power WiFi for IoT sensor-based networks will make sense across many industries.

Prediction 3: Cycle Time Improvements

This one is farthest off in the future but could be the most important because it unlocks one of the key values of the Industrial Internet – more efficient production of products and services. According to IDC, by next year investments in operational sensing through IoT and situational awareness via analytics will deliver 30% in critical process cycle times.

Prediction 4: Blockchain Realized

By unifying data logs for a variety of industries, blockchained services, which typically leverage the cloud, promise to increase productivity and reduce downtime.  For example, manufacturers will be able to share production logs with OEMs and regulators, reducing the time to find information, resolve disputes, verify transactions and expedite deliveries.

Prediction 5: Security Evolves

As we at Bayshore know, industrial enterprises are now addressing the cultural divide between IT and OT. This will lead to a necessary investment in capabilities to protect their production processes and data from cyber attack and privacy breaches. IDC says that in two years more than 75% of device manufacturers will have improved their security and privacy capabilities.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions 

Prediction 6: Industry Growth

IDC puts the initial worldwide IoT industry growth at the end of 2017.  Will that be the beginning of the “hockey stick?”  The initial markets driving the growth will be connected vehicles, insurance telematics, personal wellness, and smart buildings, accounting for $96 billion in spending.

Prediction 7: IoT/IT Services

As adoption of IoT grows, IDC predicts that 75% of IoT adopters will turn to outside firms for help in strategy, planning, development, implementation, and/or management of these initiatives.  Again, this is a trend we can verify from our experience at Bayshore.  We are seeing an increased customer reliance on carriers, cloud providers, systems integrators, machine vendors, and an emerging class of Industrial IoT architectural experts.

Prediction 8: The Edge

While we are still looking for a universally accepted definition of edge computing, there is consensus on its importance in the success of IoT.  IDC says that in two years at least 40% of IoT-created data will be stored, processed, analyzed and acted upon close to, or at, the edge of the network.

Prediction 9: Smart City Assets

At Bayshore, we are seeing the same thing. Metropolitan areas, paced by progressive CIOs in places as diverse as Barcelona, Chicago, and San Diego, are already reaping the benefits of sensor consolidation and analytics.  Look for more and more success stories in areas such as building automation, utilities, traffic management, and data center management. According to IDC, 40% of local and regional governments “will use IoT to turn infrastructure into assets Instead of liabilities” by 2019.

Prediction 10: Analytics and IoT Collide

We agree that this is the mother of all trends. While analytics is the most complex technical and cultural issue, it is clearly the #1 reason to move to the Industrial Internet.  IDC predicts that by 2019, all effective IoT efforts will merge streaming analytics with machine learning trained on data lakes, data marts, and content stores, accelerated by discrete or integrated processors.

Excerpts of IDC FutureScape: Worldwide IoT 2017 Predictions

The Bayshore IT/OT Gateway is used by industrial enterprises to provide IT with visibility into big OT data and to provide OT with access to applications such as advanced IT analytics. Transformation of OT data (Modbus TCP, DNP3, Ethernet/IP, and so on), into formats that can be interpreted by IT analytics programs (JSON, https, http, etc.) will be crucial to this adoption.

This post originally appeared here

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10 Articles on Manufacturing and IoT

This resource is part of a series of specific topics related to the Internet of Things. To keep receiving these articles, sign up on IoT Central

 

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Guest post by Toby McClean

In 2016 Microsoft, IBM, and AWS each made concerted efforts to extend their IoT platforms to the edge. The main reasons for this are economics, physics and legal. Using the terminology defined in this paper; the edge is the hubs and devices in the system. In this article, we focus on the analytics capabilities that extend to the edge.

Descriptive Analytics

A descriptive analytics capability will identify what is happening. Descriptive analytics can be as simple as providing an alert if a value exceeds a certain value.

The IBM Watson IoT Platform provides an environment for defining rules that run in the cloud or on a hub at the edge. IBM announced the capability as part of the Cisco partnership and recently made it generally available.

The recent AWS Greengrass announcement allows for AWS Lambda behavior to run on a hub. A descriptive analytic is written in one of the languages supported by AWS Lambda.

The Azure platform mentions edge analytics here, but it does not provide any specific tools or extensions to existing analytics capabilities to run edge analytics.

Diagnostic Analytics

Why is it happening? Diagnostic analytics can help to determine why an alert is triggered and whether it is relevant or not. Often organizations use diagnostic analytics they develop the models for predictive analytics.

None of the three platforms offers the ability to run diagnostic analytics models at the edge. With AWS Greengrass, in theory, a diagnostic model could be developed as a Lambda and run at the edge.

Predictive Analytics

What will happen? The most common use case of predictive analytics is predictive maintenance. More and more use cases are attempting to predict positive outcomes. For example, analyzing parts that come off a production line to predict those parts that do not need further testing.

The three platforms provide cloud-based services to build and execute predictive models. However, none of them provides the ability to provision and run the predictive model at the edge.

ADLINK, IBM, and Intel collaborated on enabling predictive maintenance and quality models to run on a hub at the edge. For more information see,

Analytics provisioning, configuration, and management

Being able to build analytics models is fine. But, there is a need to be able to push those models to the parts of the system where it makes the most sense to execute them. For this article, we are concerned with the ability to provision the gateways or things in the system.

Provisioning of descriptive analytics to the edge can be configured and managed from the Watson IoT Platform. AWS IoT is fully capable of provisioning of Lambdas from the AWS IoT cloud to hubs or things running AWS Greengrass. For Microsoft Azure IoT, the public documentation does not reveal anything on this aspect.

Conclusion

The article has made no attempt to make any specific recommendations about which platform is better. Its goal is to provide the reader with information in order to help them make an informed decision for their specific use case.

Hopefully, you find it useful and please leave comments and suggestions.

This article originally appeared here. Cover Photo: Tomas Havel

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10 Articles on Healthcare and IoT

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Guest post by Ronald van Loon 

The Internet of Things (IoT) is changing our world. This may seem like a bold statement, but consider the impact this revolutionary technology has already had on communications, education, manufacturing, science, business, and many other fields of life. Clearly, the IoT is moving really fast from concept to reality and transforming how industries operate and create value. 

As the IoT creeps towards mass adoption, IT giants experiment and innovate with the technology to explore new opportunities and create new revenue streams. I was invited to Genius of Things Summit as a Futurist by Watson IoT and WIRED Insider and attended the long-awaited grand opening of IBM’s headquarters for Watson Internet of Things in Munich. The two-day event provided me an insight into what IBM’s doing to constantly push the boundaries of what’s possible with the IoT.

In this article, I have discussed the major developments that caught my interest and that, in my opinion, will impact and improve customer experience substantially. 

IoT capabilities become an integral part of our lifestyle

According to IBM the number of connected devices is expecting to rise as high as 30 billion in the next three years. This increasingly connected culture presents businesses with an opportunity to harness digital connections to improve their products and services and ultimately, foster deeper human connections in order to improve customer experiences and relationships. 

IBM, being one of the world’s top innovators in IoT, announced an exciting series of new offerings at The Genius of Things Summit alongside 22 clients and partners. These new IoT capabilities are likely to be the future of the IoT and become an integral part of our lifestyle in the near future. 

Digital Twin 

Traditionally, industrial assets are designed, built, and operated using numerous data sources with engineers working in specialized teams that conduct analysis for their specific tasks separately. As a result, the most current information may not be available readily for critical decisions. These silos, in turn, lead to increased costs and inefficiencies, create uncertainties, and require vast amount of time and resources. Digital Twin is a more efficient of working. It is a cloud-based virtual image of an asset maintained throughout the lifecycle and easily accessible at any time. One platform brings all experts together, allowing them to work cost-effectively using a collaboration platform, which helps reduce errors and improve efficiency. Consequently, this enables more profitable, safe, and sustainable operation. 

Case — Airbus Makes Digital Twin Come to Life

 Airbus and Schaeffler are using digital twin engines and digital twin bearings, respectively, to transform their production process, increasing operation productivity and improving design elements. IBM Watson is the IoT platform through which these two companies are reshaping their corresponding industries. Cognitive cloud based insights augments predictive systems to enable improved safety and efficiency for these two manufacturing organizations. Watch the Digital Twin replay from Genius of Things.

Cognitive Commerce 

Cognitive commerce is a revolutionary phenomenon that involves the use of a spectrum of technologies, ranging from speech recognition to a recommendations system based on machine learning. A cognitive commerce journey is based on an in-depth understanding of customers’ behaviors and preferences, both at aggregate and individual level. The knowledge is then applied in a real-time manner to offer a truly personalized experience to the customers in order to improve their satisfaction and drive more revenue to the business. 

Case: Visa Embraces the IoT

Visa partnered with IBM to leverage on the cognitive capabilities of IBM’s Watson IoT platform. The collaboration allowed Visa to launch a technology that will allow customers to make payments from any IoT connected device, from an application to a car or a watch. The new technology will not only eliminate the need to use sensitive financial information present on payment cards, but will also introduce a new level of simplicity and convenience to customer journey. See the video about Visa and IBM

Predictive Maintenance 

Predictive maintenance is a valuable application of the Internet of Things that helps reduce maintenance costs, increase asset availability, and improve customer satisfaction by issuing an alert before a machine or equipment breaks down. The technology involves analysis of large volumes of sensor data, such as temperature, oil levels, vibration, and voltage to predict maintenance needs before equipment failures happen. 

Case: Watson IoT to Help SNCF Railway Run Smoothly

SNCF is a leader in passenger and freight transport services that has a network of over 15,000 trainers covering more than 30,000 kilometers of track. The company recently announced its collaboration with IBM. The collaboration will help SNCF connect its entire rail system, including trains, train stations, and railroad tracks to Watson IoT. Using real-time data collected from sensors, the company will be able to anticipate repair needs and improve the security and availability of its assets. Watch the CTO of SNCF explain more about their approach to better client outcomes with IoT. 

Connected Devices

This involves the use of sensors to merge the real world and the digital world. These sensors are used in automobiles, smartphones, and other devices to make the devices web-compatible. These sensors measure humidity, light, temperature, magnetic fields, pressure, and sound. The information collected is programmed, processed, and transmitted using a radio network to the user, allowing them to control their smart devices from a remote location.

Case: Bosch Makes Industrial IoT a Reality

Bosch recently introduced its new and revolutionary ‘Bosch IoT Rollouts’ service for advance device management and cloud-based software updates. Bosch will leverage on its development and manufacturing expertise as well as the IBM’s Watson IoT platform to update connected devices in a seamless manner and deliver personalized services and experience to customers with connected devices. Watch how Bosch and IBM are working together on the glue between IoT and connected products and devices.

The impact of how digitizing the physical infrastructure around us affects customer experiences is an ongoing source of inspiration for me. I will appreciate your comments, insights, and feedback on this article, as well as invite you to follow me on Twitter and LinkedIn to learn more about Big Data and IoT.

This post originally appeared here.

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IoT Central Digest, February 22, 2017

Welcome to the latest edition of the IoT Central Digest. This issue asks us to think about IoT-in-a-box, the differences between IoT and IIoT, and why we must regulate the IoT. As always we include more technical views such as help in really understanding blockchain technology, resources for embedded firmware and more. Enjoy. 

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here.

Is it the time for Internet of Things in a Box (IoT in a Box)?

What is the difference between Consumer IoT and Industrial IoT (IIoT)?

6 Videos That Will Get You Up to Speed on Blockchain

5 Rules for Manufacturers in Securing the Internet of Things


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Internet of Things: Healthcare & Medical

Guest post by Vinay Solanki

Application of "IoT", the latest buzz word as many would like to call it, are numerous and have been covered under the topics below. If you would like to go through - IoT for smart villages, IoT for managing road accidents, IoT in retail sector, IoT for smart home, use case for smart clothes and what IoT really means to a layman.

Health industry is one the largest in any country both in terms of the required reach to the masses and in terms of per capita budget. Human being save money to live comfortably, to get their child married, to buy a house and last but not the least to pay for medical bills. As per the latest reports on USA health stats only 21 out of 100 people (< 65 age) have medical coverage. But the spend on prescription drugs is rapidly increasing from 2004 ($192 B) to 2014 ($297) however maximum of this spend is funded by private savings. Scenario is not much different in other developed countries.

On the other end if we look at developing countries like India, then as per WHO the top 10 reason of deaths in India includes hearth diseases, obstructive pulmonary, stroke and so on.

Other emerging and under developed nations will have similar stats or even worse. So why do I think IoT based solutions can improve these stats in a positive way? Let's see some of the health and medical related IoT apps, devices, solutions and monitoring systems that can have a cost effective impact on these issues. Additionally I think if Government increase its spend on R&D it can immensely help to make the solutions more scalable and deployable.

Proactive Health SolutionsYolo Health ATM is an integrated health screening kiosk with integrated medical devices such as Glucometer, BP monitor, BMI calculator, etc, and also staffed by a medical attendant. This can be next generation kiosk that will help people, short on time, to be more proactive about their health. This also holds potential to be deployed in rural areas where primary healthcare penetration is limited. Wearables such as FitBit, Apple Watch and various health bands are not new to us and they help a great deal in tracking your activities in real time.

Remote Patient Monitoring: Healthcare providers and family members always wish to monitor the health of the patient in real time. Pre and Post operative measures are taken to monitor patients health and IoT can enable solution that can allow to achieve this more efficiently and economically. Real time information, published through cloud, will help caregivers to make informed decisions and diagnosis, which are more evidence based. In the current world it is a mixture of symptoms, patients reactions and doctors gut feel which sometimes leads to trial and error diagnosis. IoT can provide real time data and more accurate information at the right time, which can revolutionize the healthcare market. This will also help in preventive disease management, reduced health care cost, enhanced patient experience, reduced errors and shorter recovery cycle.

Drugs Management: From the point of improving process on the manufacturing and R&D facilities using sensor based proactive maintenance systems and real time information feeding pipes to improving the tracking of drugs from the point of distribution to the point of purchase - IoT has a big role to play. While I won't go deep as they are not directly healthcare related but I would like to mention - supply chain management, fleet management, asset tracking, temperature and humidity monitoring and inventory management are all the categories of solutions that can help in this area.

Forbes article talks about partnership between Qualcomm and Philips to focus on creating healthcare IoT solutions such as connected dispensers for medicines, biological sensors, self care glucose meters for diabetics to an integrated cloud system for health record monitoring. Connected Medical Equipment which can transmit the data captured through sensors and of course from the patient directly onto the cloud for transparency and monitoring purpose as described here is a very handy use case for IoT.

Personal Health Data Security: However the concern many of us is security and safety of that sensitive private data about my health to be lost, hacked, misused by anyone. What if the data is captured and used for targeting ads at me? I think this is fine because it will only SPAM my life but not endanger it. Healthcare IoT Security Risk is a worth short article to read. LinkLabs also talks some of these use cases and concerns nicely.

#IoT, #M2M, #Healthcare, #Medicine, #Wearable, #Remote Patient Monitoring

This article originally appeared here.

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How to Nail your Internet of Things Interview

The internet of things is the future of technology. If you plan on getting a position that relies heavily on it, there are a few simple things you can do to ensure success.

First, understand what the company does and their approach to the IoT. If the company makes connected thermostats, you’ll want to ensure you have some knowledge about that area of expertise. If they manage a series of connected devices on a production line, you need working knowledge of how to interact and program those elements. Not every device is the same, so make sure you understand what knowledge is required for the position you are interested in. After all, simply operating these devices is vastly different from programming them.

Next, remember that the tiny details matter. Have you had experience with a particular system or code? Make sure you mention it. While your resume is a good outline for who you are, your knowledge and level of comfort with the topic during your interview will actually have more of an impact.

This means also taking the time to understand the company. Do your research and find out what projects they are working on. If their focus is on new avenues of technology you can briefly talk about it. When you don’t show any genuine interest in the company or knowledge, you put yourself in a position where the interviewer doesn’t take you as seriously.

Your first impression is also key. While it is important to know your stuff, also prove you have the desire to be there. Make sure you show up no more than 5 minutes early to your interview. Make sure you are cordial to all staff, including the receptionist. Many companies watch how potential employees interact with what are deemed “lower” importance employees. If you are rude, condescending, or cold they will find out and it could cost you a job. Ultimately, all employees in a company have a valuable purpose and no one position can do their job without the others ensuring the office functions.

Finally, make sure you read up on the latest internet of technology news pieces that come out. Did a major company announce a new revolutionary advancement? Then you’ll want to mention it. This shows you stay current and if you discover something that manager doesn’t know, they might see you as an invaluable expert in the industry. That could help you to nail that interview and go on to make waves in the industry.

About Bill McCabe/ SoftNet Search Partners and Internetofthingsrecruiting.com

Top 50 IOT Authority on Twitter - per IoT Central

#1 IOT Recruitment Thought Leader In The World

If you require the top 5% of IOT talent let’s talk. Drop me a line or use this link to schedule an IOT Search Assessment Call http://internetofthingsrecruiting.com/schedule-a-conference/

OR Contact me at 303-337-7871

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Think you found the perfect candidate for your internet of things position? Even if their resume is incredible and they aced the initial interview, there are five questions you want to ask them. These questions will give you a better understanding of the candidate.

What Recent Changes in the IoT Do You Feel Is the Most Groundbreaking?

You want to know what their knowledge is specifically. This not only weeds out those who are great with buzzwords and no real knowledge, but also allows you to see who is keeping up with trends. In this position, you want the best, smartest, and fastest individual possible. The only way to get that is to find someone who is keeping up with trends.

How Would You Assess a Security Concern in Our Software?

You don’t want someone who will tell you that they doubt that there is a problem. You want to view the problem solving abilities of a person, in case something happens. This goes beyond just skimming the top. Make sure you press for details. You need to know how this person thinks and what makes them the best.

What Was the Last Training Course You Took?

How current are their skills? If someone hasn’t been to training of any kind in a few years, their knowledge might not be up to par. Yes, you can always send a top tier candidate to training, but you should know what they can do already.

What is the Most Overlooked Thing with the IoT during Development and Deployment?

We can all improve. Sometimes fresh eyes understand things that we all overlook. These questions will give you some insight into the critical thinking and analytical skills of someone. You may find that they are spot on or even have some insight that can help you to do more in your company.

How Will You Take Our Technology to the Next Level?

What you don’t want are simple explanations like making you the best. This is detailed information on what they can do for you. You want specifics and you may even ask them to demonstrate some of the elements that they are offering you.

It shouldn’t be too hard to find the perfect candidate when you keep all of this in mind. Just make sure that you take the time to get a true feeling for your candidates before you pull the hiring trigger.

About Bill McCabe/ Internet of Things Recruiting @IoTRecruiting

Stop losing your best candidates to counter offers. Stop hiring the wrong person for the job. IOT Recruiting has the best in IT security and IoT candidates who are ready to fill your crucial positions. Number 17 on the list of top 50 IoT influencers, Bill MCCabe has the hiring expertise that you need for your vacancies. Find out how you can take advantage of of all that Bill has to offer. Schedule a free 10 minute call today

http://internetofthingsrecruiting.com/schedule-a-conference/

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Harvard Business Review, with the sponsorship of Verizon, just published a new report on IoT. This time the focus is on big data strategy.

The report shows that most companies are taking a largely ad hoc approach to big data today, according to a September 2016 survey of 306 business leaders conducted by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services. Nearly half of respondents said they pursue big data initiatives on a per-project basis, with just 18 percent saying they have an enterprise big data strategy and approach. Some findings:

  • 44% aim to use IoT to transform their business model.
  • 78% are acting on only a limited amount of IoT data—or aren’t using any at all.
  • 42% say lack of skills/capabilities is preventing them from acting on more big data.
  • 51% are struggling with big data variety and complexity.
  • 78% say that new networking technologies are important to their big data strategies.

Many of the other findings in the report are pretty dour, but also notes that business leaders have high hopes for IoT technology and that their expectations for the business benefits of IoT implementation are significant. Still worth a read. 

Get the full report here

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What will this market bring us in the next few years? Are there reasons for optimism?

During the last three years, I have had the opportunity to discover, know and analyse more than 50 Spanish companies in the exciting sector of the Internet of Things (IoT).

Some of these companies are globally recognized as pioneers of IoT. Others less known but very innovative, with great talent in their ranks. All of them have been weathering the storm and far from being discouraged, because the reality is being tougher than all the hype announced by analysts, are more excited than ever before future expectations.

As I wrote in my post “5 PROVERBS TO SAVE MY STARTUP”, nobody is a prophet in their land, but even so, I can not resist providing a few tips that I believe can help us use IoT as an enabler that drives the ICT sector. Would not it be fantastic if we finally met our desire to have a strong, dynamic, competitive and innovative ICT sector in our society?

Accept reality

And the stark reality is: "Spain is not a technological country, it is a service country". I think that the lapidary expression of Miguel de Unamuno, that “they invent it”, also applies to the IoT. But it is one thing not to invent and another is to become sellers of products, solutions or services of multinationals by all known.

We must use our ingenuity, talent, creativity, and customer orientation to design and develop quality, easy-to-use global IoT solutions.

If we are good sellers of foreign products, the language should be the problem. Our objective market should not be our City, our Community or our Country, our market must be the world.

Focus, Focus and Focus

I have insisted on many forums that in Spain we can not do everything on IoT. For example, we can be leaders in Smart Cities, but we will have little chance of success in Connected Cars, we must fight to find a gap in Industry 4.0 (also known as Industrial Internet or IIOT) but I fear we will not be number 1 in Wearables, although we could be innovative in Health services.

We must analyse our strengths and weaknesses to recognize where our opportunities are and what our threats are. Let us be references in our focus areas.

Trusted Ecosystems

We know that there is not a single company in the world that can do everything in IoT, much less leading the IoT, so it is obvious that our companies and Startups have no other choice than to create or be part of reliable ecosystems and Collaborative projects in the focus areas to meet the challenges posed by IoT projects.

We must design new sustainable business models with our local partners, it is time to trust if we want to survive in this competitive and fragmented sector until the magic 2020.

It's time to real collaboration, put a logo on our presentations and our website is absurd if there is something else behind.

Specialization

Given the size of IoT Spanish companies it is not possible to do everything and get it right.

We must specialize, whether manufacturing specific hardware, developing software or offering services in our focus areas.

Scalability

To succeed in IoT, Spanish companies must be able to offer global and scalable solutions. We will need startup talent to focus on companies of a larger size than without giving up innovation and agility, being able to cope with large national and international IoT projects.

Expect to be outsourced by other subcontractors of a company that works for an end customer is not acceptable if we really want to change. It is a pending subject of our business model not only in technology, it is a deep-seated problem of corporate culture.

We should be able to have at least one unicorn in IoT. And I'm not talking about Telefonica, Banco Santander, BBVA, Iberdrola, Inditex, ACS, Ferrovial or Indra, but a company that provides a new IoTaaS model based on our strengths (which all or almost all know) Services and HW / SW IoT products from Spanish manufacturers. That is, we must think about having our Uber, Airbnb or why not our Spanish Tesla.

We must look for concentration of companies in the focus areas to achieve the size that allows the scalability that the IoT business needs.

Invest in Education and Training

The IoT is complex, although many try to make it simple. We will need many types of profiles and not just theoretical knowledge.

It is vital at both, the private and public levels, that the Public Administrations and Companies dedicate funds to continuously educate students and train employees in the IoT technologies.

 “Investing now in IoT training will be key to ensuring a sustainable future for our companies, our country and our professionals.”

 Start Now

This advice goes to both Enterprises and Public Administrations.

In the case of Enterprises, it would be highly desirable to lose for once the fear of being the first to implement technology solutions. You must consider IoT a key element in the digitization process of your company.

Public Administrations, stop using your budgets as always, and think about investing in a more sustainable, intelligent and connected citizen.

To conclude, pulling on the proverb I think:

"We have the wicker, so we must have confidence that we can make a great basket in IoT".

You can read the Spanish version here.

Thanks in advance for your Likes and Shares

Thoughts ? Comments ?

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IoT Central Digest, January 17, 2017

Happy New Year to all our members old, new, near and far!

If you want to look ahead into 2017, make sure to read the 50 predictions we put together. With input from vendors large and small, including AT&T, Autodesk, Hitachi, Intel, Salesforce and many others, these predictions cover a lot of ground including security, buildings, big data, ecosystems, and standards. Be sure to check them out.

This issue also looks at cars and IoT, security and stopping IoT attacks, health and big data analytics, and the ongoing IoT standards discussion. Enjoy!

Reminder: All members are free to post on IoT Central. We feature the best content and share across our social networks and other channels. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here.

50 Predictions for the Internet of Things in 2017
Posted by David Oro


For 2017, we asked our members, industry contacts and friends for their predictions around the Internet of Things. What new technologies will appear? Which companies will succeed or fail? What platforms will take off? What security challenges will the industry face? Will enterprises finally realize the benefits of IoT?

12 Steps to Stop the Next IoT Attack in its Tracks
Posted by Rob Tiffany

The IoT attack against Domain Name Servers from a botnet of thousands of devices means it’s way past time to take IoT security seriously. The bad actors around the world who previously used PCs, servers and smartphones to carry out attacks have now set their sights on the growing tidal wave of IoT devices. It’s time for consumers and enterprises to protect themselves and others by locking down their devices, gateways and platforms.

IoT Future – 34 Billion new Devices in 4 Years?
Posted by Joao Lopes


The most recent studies indicate that in 2020 more than 34 billion devices will be connected to the internet, in many sectors (Industrial, Agriculture, Transportation, Wearable Devices, Smart Cities, Smart Houses, etc). Of these 34 billion, the IoT will be responsible for 23 billion devices, the others 11 billion will be represented by the regular devices, such as, smartphones, tablets, smartwatches, etc.

Internet of Health: Is medicine ready to Big Data Analytics?
Guest blog post by Olga Kolesnichenko

What is Big Data: data, process of analysis or concept? There are many definitions that describe Big Data as big amount of data or as some methods of analytics of big amount of data. But more applicable is the approach that Big Data is the concept that includes: data with specific characteristics (V3 - volume, velocity, variety, or V5 - plus value and veracity), methods of analytics (the number of different software is growing), and devices, infrastructure, and most important - the ideas how to configure all into needed solution.

This is how Analytics is changing the game of Sports!!
Posted by Sandeep raut

Today, every major professional sports team either has an analytics department or an analytics expert on staff.  From coaches and players to front offices and businesses, analytics can make a difference in scoring touchdowns, signing contracts or preventing injuries. This article highlights the use of devices and analytics for sports.

Cars and Car Transportation in The Internet of Things Era
Posted by Nate Vickery

Whenever we read about, or hear about, people confidently presenting their vision of any kind of future trends, we, of course, need to take it with a grain of salt. However, as a business technology expert, I know where to look for indications on the direction technology is taking, and for the fun of it, I will try to make some educated guesses.
Let’s see what some of the trends that could change the way we travel are.

How to secure your smarthome gadgets
By Ben Dickson

The holiday season is a big time for consumer electronics and smart home gadget sales. With so many advances and innovations that we saw in the Internet of Things in 2016, there’s a likely chance that one of those connected devices has found its way into your home, or that of one of your loved ones, this Christmas.

But while IoT devices make our homes more efficient, drive energy saving and reduce costs, you should also take note that IoT devices are a source of security headaches. A huge number of smarthome gadgets are developed without sound development practices and end up being used for evil purposes.

NB-IoT is Dead. Long Live NB-IoT.
Guest post by Nick Hunn

As the old adage goes, “while the cat’s away, the mice will play”. In the case of NB-IOT, “when the spec’s delayed, LPWAN will play”, which is exactly what’s happening in the Internet of Things market today. The problem is that 3GPP (the 3rd Generation Partnership Project), the standards body which has been responsible for the 3G, 4G and 5G mobile standards, dropped the ball as far as the Internet of Things is concerned. Seduced by the slabs of black glass which suck up both our attention and the mobile networks’ spectrum, the 3GPP engineers totally forgot to design something to replace the old 2G workhorse of GPRS, which is responsible for most of today’s machine to machine communications. Instead, they spent all of their time designing high power, high speed, expensive variants of 4G to support an ongoing dynasty of iPhones, Galaxys and Pixels, none of which were any use for the Internet of Things.


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