Subscribe to our Newsletter | To Post On IoT Central, Click here


Devices (277)

Today the world is obsessed with the IoT, as if this is a new concept. We've been building the IoT for decades, but it was only recently some marketing "genius" came up with the new buzz-acronym.

Before there was an IoT, before there was an Internet, many of us were busy networking. For the Internet itself was a (brilliant) extension of what was already going on in the industry.

My first experience with networking was in 1971 at the University of Maryland. The school had a new computer, a $10 million Univac 1108 mainframe. This was a massive beast that occupied most of the first floor of a building. A dual-processor machine it was transistorized, though the control console did have some ICs. Rows of big tape drives mirrored the layman's idea of computers in those days. Many dishwasher-sized disk drives were placed around the floor and printers, card readers and other equipment were crammed into every corner. Two Fastrand drum memories, each consisting of a pair of six-foot long counterrotating drums, stored a whopping 90 MB each. Through a window you could watch the heads bounce around.

The machine was networked. It had a 300 baud modem with which it could contact computers at other universities. A primitive email system let users create mail which was queued till nightfall. Then, when demands on the machine were small, it would call the appropriate remote computer and forward mail. The system operated somewhat like today's "hot potato" packets, where the message might get delivered to the easiest machine available, which would then attempt further forwarding. It could take a week to get an email, but at least one saved the $0.08 stamp that the USPS charged.

The system was too slow to be useful. After college I lost my email account but didn't miss it at all.

By the late 70s many of us had our own computers. Mine was a home-made CP/M machine with a Z80 processor and a small TV set as a low-res monitor. Around this time Compuserve came along and I, like so many others, got an account with them. Among other features, users had email addresses. Pretty soon it was common to dial into their machines over a 300 baud modem and exchange email and files. Eventually Compuserve became so ubiquitous that millions were connected, and at my tools business during the 1980s it was common to provide support via this email. The CP/M machine gave way to a succession of PCs, Modems ramped up to 57 K baud.

My tools business expanded rapidly and soon we had a number of employees. Sneakernet was getting less efficient so we installed an Arcnet network using Windows 3.11. That morphed into Ethernet connections, though the cursing from networking problems multiplied about as fast as the data transfers. Windows was just terrible at maintaining reliable connectivity.

In 1992 Mike Lee, a friend from my Boys Night Out beer/politics/sailing/great friends group, which still meets weekly (though lately virtually) came by the office with his laptop. "You have GOT to see this" he intoned, and he showed me the world-wide web. There wasn't much to see as there were few sites. But the promise was shockingly clear. I was stunned.

The tools business had been doing well. Within a month we spent $100k on computers, modems and the like and had a new business: Softaid Internet Services. SIS was one of Maryland's first ISPs and grew quickly to several thousand customers. We had a T1 connection to MAE-EAST in the DC area which gave us a 1.5 Mb/s link… for $5000/month. Though a few customers had ISDN connections to us, most were dialup, and our modem shelf grew to over 100 units with many big fans keeping the things cool.

The computers all ran BSD Unix, which was my first intro to that OS.

I was only a few months back from a failed attempt to singlehand my sailboat across the Atlantic and had written a book-length account of that trip. I hastily created a web page of that book to learn about using the web. It is still online and has been read several million times in the intervening years. We put up a site for the tools business which eventually became our prime marketing arm.

The SIS customers were sometimes, well, "interesting." There was the one who claimed to be a computer expert, but who tried to use the mouse by waving it around over the desk. Many had no idea how to connect a modem. Others complained about our service because it dropped out when mom would pick up the phone to make a call over the modem's beeping. A lot of handholding and training was required.

The logs showed a shocking (to me at the time) amount of porn consumption. Over lunch an industry pundit explained how porn drove all media, from the earliest introduction of printing hundreds of years earlier.

The woman who ran the ISP was from India. She was delightful and had a wonderful marriage. She later told me it had been arranged; they met  their wedding day. She came from a remote and poor village and had had no exposure to computers, or electricity, till emigrating to the USA.

Meanwhile many of our tools customers were building networking equipment. We worked closely with many of them and often had big routers, switches and the like onsite that our engineers were working on. We worked on a lot of what we'd now call IoT gear: sensors et al connected to the net via a profusion of interfaces.

I sold both the tools and Internet businesses in 1997, but by then the web and Internet were old stories.

Today, like so many of us, I have a fast (250 Mb/s) and cheap connection into the house with four wireless links and multiple computers chattering to each other. Where in 1992 the web was incredibly novel and truly lacking in useful functionality, now I can't imagine being deprived of it. Remember travel agents? Ordering things over the phone (a phone that had a physical wire connecting it to Ma Bell)? Using 15 volumes of an encyclopedia? Physically mailing stuff to each other?

As one gets older the years spin by like microseconds, but it is amazing to stop and consider just how much this world has changed. My great grandfather lived on a farm in a world that changed slowly; he finally got electricity in his last year of life. His daughter didn't have access to a telephone till later in life, and my dad designed spacecraft on vellum and starched linen using a slide rule. My son once saw a typewriter and asked me what it was; I mumbled that it was a predecessor of Microsoft Word.

That he understood. I didn't have the heart to try and explain carbon paper.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

When I think about the things that held the planet together in 2020, it was digital experiences delivered over wireless connectivity that made remote things local.

While heroes like doctors, nurses, first responders, teachers, and other essential personnel bore the brunt of the COVID-19 response, billions of people around the world found themselves cut off from society. In order to keep people safe, we were physically isolated from each other. Far beyond the six feet of social distancing, most of humanity weathered the storm from their homes.

And then little by little, old things we took for granted, combined with new things many had never heard of, pulled the world together. Let’s take a look at the technologies and trends that made the biggest impact in 2020 and where they’re headed in 2021:

The Internet

The global Internet infrastructure from which everything else is built is an undeniable hero of the pandemic. This highly-distributed network designed to withstand a nuclear attack performed admirably as usage by people, machines, critical infrastructure, hospitals, and businesses skyrocketed. Like the air we breathe, this primary facilitator of connected, digital experiences is indispensable to our modern society. Unfortunately, the Internet is also home to a growing cyberwar and security will be the biggest concern as we move into 2021 and beyond. It goes without saying that the Internet is one of the world’s most critical utilities along with water, electricity, and the farm-to-table supply chain of food.

Wireless Connectivity

People are mobile and they stay connected through their smartphones, tablets, in cars and airplanes, on laptops, and other devices. Just like the Internet, the cellular infrastructure has remained exceptionally resilient to enable communications and digital experiences delivered via native apps and the web. Indoor wireless connectivity continues to be dominated by WiFi at home and all those empty offices. Moving into 2021, the continued rollout of 5G around the world will give cellular endpoints dramatic increases in data capacity and WiFi-like speeds. Additionally, private 5G networks will challenge WiFi as a formidable indoor option, but WiFi 6E with increased capacity and speed won’t give up without a fight. All of these developments are good for consumers who need to stay connected from anywhere like never before.

Web Conferencing

With many people stuck at home in 2020, web conferencing technology took the place of traveling to other locations to meet people or receive education. This technology isn’t new and includes familiar players like GoToMeeting, Skype, WebEx, Google Hangouts/Meet, BlueJeans, FaceTime, and others. Before COVID, these platforms enjoyed success, but most people preferred to fly on airplanes to meet customers and attend conferences while students hopped on the bus to go to school. In 2020, “necessity is the mother of invention” took hold and the use of Zoom and Teams skyrocketed as airplanes sat on the ground while business offices and schools remained empty. These two platforms further increased their stickiness by increasing the number of visible people and adding features like breakout rooms to meet the demands of businesses, virtual conference organizers, and school teachers. Despite the rollout of the vaccine, COVID won’t be extinguished overnight and these platforms will remain strong through the first half of 2021 as organizations rethink where and when people work and learn. There’s way too many players in this space so look for some consolidation.

E-Commerce

“Stay at home” orders and closed businesses gave e-commerce platforms a dramatic boost in 2020 as they took the place of shopping at stores or going to malls. Amazon soared to even higher heights, Walmart upped their game, Etsy brought the artsy, and thousands of Shopify sites delivered the goods. Speaking of delivery, the empty city streets became home to fleets FedEx, Amazon, UPS, and DHL trucks bringing packages to your front doorstep. Many retail employees traded-in working at customer-facing stores for working in a distribution centers as long as they could outperform robots. Even though people are looking forward to hanging out at malls in 2021, the e-commerce, distribution center, delivery truck trinity is here to stay. This ball was already in motion and got a rocket boost from COVID. This market will stay hot in the first half of 2021 and then cool a bit in the second half.

Ghost Kitchens

The COVID pandemic really took a toll on restaurants in the 2020, with many of them going out of business permanently. Those that survived had to pivot to digital and other ways of doing business. High-end steakhouses started making burgers on grills in the parking lot, while takeout pizzerias discovered they finally had the best business model. Having a drive-thru lane was definitely one of the keys to success in a world without waiters, busboys, and hosts. “Front of house” was shut down, but the “back of house” still had a pulse. Adding mobile web and native apps that allowed customers to easily order from operating “ghost kitchens” and pay with credit cards or Apple/Google/Samsung Pay enabled many restaurants to survive. A combination of curbside pickup and delivery from the likes of DoorDash, Uber Eats, Postmates, Instacart and Grubhub made this business model work. A surge in digital marketing also took place where many restaurants learned the importance of maintaining a relationship with their loyal customers via connected mobile devices. For the most part, 2021 has restauranteurs hoping for 100% in-person dining, but a new business model that looks a lot like catering + digital + physical delivery is something that has legs.

The Internet of Things

At its very essence, IoT is all about remotely knowing the state of a device or environmental system along with being able to remotely control some of those machines. COVID forced people to work, learn, and meet remotely and this same trend applied to the industrial world. The need to remotely operate industrial equipment or an entire “lights out” factory became an urgent imperative in order to keep workers safe. This is yet another case where the pandemic dramatically accelerated digital transformation. Connecting everything via APIs, modeling entities as digital twins, and having software bots bring everything to life with analytics has become an ROI game-changer for companies trying to survive in a free-falling economy. Despite massive employee layoffs and furloughs, jobs and tasks still have to be accomplished, and business leaders will look to IoT-fueled automation to keep their companies running and drive economic gains in 2021.

Streaming Entertainment

Closed movie theaters, football stadiums, bowling alleys, and other sources of entertainment left most people sitting at home watching TV in 2020. This turned into a dream come true for streaming entertainment companies like Netflix, Apple TV+, Disney+, HBO Max, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, Youtube TV, and others. That said, Quibi and Facebook Watch didn’t make it. The idea of binge-watching shows during the weekend turned into binge-watching every season of every show almost every day. Delivering all these streams over the Internet via apps has made it easy to get hooked. Multiplayer video games fall in this category as well and represent an even larger market than the film industry. Gamers socially distanced as they played each other from their locked-down homes. The rise of cloud gaming combined with the rollout of low-latency 5G and Edge computing will give gamers true mobility in 2021. On the other hand, the video streaming market has too many players and looks ripe for consolidation in 2021 as people escape the living room once the vaccine is broadly deployed.

Healthcare

With doctors and nurses working around the clock as hospitals and clinics were stretched to the limit, it became increasingly difficult for non-COVID patients to receive the healthcare they needed. This unfortunate situation gave tele-medicine the shot in the arm (no pun intended) it needed. The combination of healthcare professionals delivering healthcare digitally over widespread connectivity helped those in need. This was especially important in rural areas that lacked the healthcare capacity of cities. Concurrently, the Internet of Things is making deeper inroads into delivering the health of a person to healthcare professionals via wearable technology. Connected healthcare has a bright future that will accelerate in 2021 as high-bandwidth 5G provides coverage to more of the population to facilitate virtual visits to the doctor from anywhere.

Working and Living

As companies and governments told their employees to work from home, it gave people time to rethink their living and working situation. Lots of people living in previously hip, urban, high-rise buildings found themselves residing in not-so-cool, hollowed-out ghost towns comprised of boarded-up windows and closed bars and cafés. Others began to question why they were living in areas with expensive real estate and high taxes when they not longer had to be close to the office. This led to a 2020 COVID exodus out of pricey apartments/condos downtown to cheaper homes in distant suburbs as well as the move from pricey areas like Silicon Valley to cheaper destinations like Texas. Since you were stuck in your home, having a larger house with a home office, fast broadband, and a back yard became the most important thing. Looking ahead to 2021, a hybrid model of work-from-home plus occasionally going into the office is here to stay as employees will no longer tolerate sitting in traffic two hours a day just to sit in a cubicle in a skyscraper. The digital transformation of how and where we work has truly accelerated.

Data and Advanced Analytics

Data has shown itself to be one of the world’s most important assets during the time of COVID. Petabytes of data has continuously streamed-in from all over the world letting us know the number of cases, the growth or decline of infections, hospitalizations, contact-tracing, free ICU beds, temperature checks, deaths, and hotspots of infection. Some of this data has been reported manually while lots of other sources are fully automated from machines. Capturing, storing, organizing, modeling and analyzing this big data has elevated the importance of cloud and edge computing, global-scale databases, advanced analytics software, and the growing importance of machine learning. This is a trend that was already taking place in business and now has a giant spotlight on it due to its global importance. There’s no stopping the data + advanced analytics juggernaut in 2021 and beyond.

Conclusion

2020 was one of the worst years in human history and the loss of life was just heartbreaking. People, businesses, and our education system had to become resourceful to survive. This resourcefulness amplified the importance of delivering connected, digital experiences to make previously remote things into local ones. Cheers to 2021 and the hope for a brighter day for all of humanity.

Read more…

By Michele Pelino

The COVID-19 pandemic drove businesses and employees to became more reliant on technology for both professional and personal purposes. In 2021, demand for new internet-of-things (IoT) applications, technologies, and solutions will be driven by connected healthcare, smart offices, remote asset monitoring, and location services, all powered by a growing diversity of networking technologies.

In 2021, we predict that:

  • Network connectivity chaos will reign. Technology leaders will be inundated by an array of wireless connectivity options. Forrester expects that implementation of 5G and Wi-Fi technologies will decline from 2020 levels as organizations sort through market chaos. For long-distance connectivity, low-earth-orbit satellites now provide a complementary option, with more than 400 Starlink satellites delivering satellite connectivity today. We expect interest in satellite and other lower-power networking technologies to increase by 20% in the coming year.
  • Connected device makers will double down on healthcare use cases. Many people stayed at home in 2020, leaving chronic conditions unmanaged, cancers undetected, and preventable conditions unnoticed. In 2021, proactive engagement using wearables and sensors to detect patients’ health at home will surge. Consumer interest in digital health devices will accelerate as individuals appreciate the convenience of at-home monitoring, insight into their health, and the reduced cost of connected health devices.
  • Smart office initiatives will drive employee-experience transformation. In 2021, some firms will ditch expensive corporate real estate driven by the COVID-19 crisis. However, we expect at least 80% of firms to develop comprehensive on-premises return-to-work office strategies that include IoT applications to enhance employee safety and improve resource efficiency such as smart lighting, energy and environmental monitoring, or sensor-enabled space utilization and activity monitoring in high traffic areas.*
  • The near ubiquity of connected machines will finally disrupt traditional business. Manufacturers, distributors, utilities, and pharma firms switched to remote operations in 2020 and began connecting previously disconnected assets. This connected-asset approach increased reliance on remote experts to address repairs without protracted downtime and expensive travel. In 2021, field service firms and industrial OEMs will rush to keep up with customer demand for more connected assets and machines.
  • Consumer and employee location data will be core to convenience. The COVID-19 pandemic elevated the importance location plays in delivering convenient customer and employee experiences. In 2021, brands must utilize location to generate convenience for consumers or employees with virtual queues, curbside pickup, and checking in for reservations. They will depend on technology partners to help use location data, as well as a third-party source of location trusted and controlled by consumers.

* Proactive firms, including Atea, have extended IoT investments to enhance employee experience and productivity by enabling employees to access a mobile app that uses data collected from light-fixture sensors to locate open desks and conference rooms. Employees can modify light and temperature settings according to personal preferences, and the system adjusts light color and intensity to better align with employees’ circadian rhythms to aid in concentration and energy levels. See the Forrester report “Rethink Your Smart Office Strategy.”

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

New solar performance monitoring system has potential to become IoT of photovoltaics. Credit: Pexels

A new system for measuring solar performance over the long term in scalable photovoltaic systems, developed by Arizona State University researchers, represents a breakthrough in the cost and longevity of interconnected power delivery.

When solar cells are developed, they are "current-voltage" tested in the lab before they are deployed in panels and systems outdoors. Once installed outdoors, they aren't usually tested again unless the system undergoes major issues. The new test system, Suns-Voc, measures the system's voltage as a function of light intensity in the outdoor setting, enabling real-time measurements of performance and detailed diagnostics.

"Inside the lab, however, everything is controlled," explained Alexander Killam, an ASU electrical engineering doctoral student and graduate research associate. "Our research has developed a way to use Suns-Voc to measure solar panels' degradation once they are outdoors in the real world and affected by weather, temperature and humidity," he said.

Current photovoltaic modules are rated to last 25 years at 80 percent efficiency. The goal is to expand that time frame to 50 years or longer.

"This system of monitoring will give photovoltaic manufacturers and big utility installations the kind of data necessary to adjust designs to increase efficiency and lifespans," said Killam, the lead author of "Monitoring of Photovoltaic System Performance Using Outdoor Suns-Voc," for Joule.

For example, most techniques used to measure outdoor solar efficiency require you to disconnect from the power delivery mechanism. The new approach can automatically measure daily during sunrise and sunset without interfering with power delivery.

"When we were developing photovoltaics 20 years ago, panels were expensive," said Stuart Bowden, an associate research professor who heads the silicon section of ASU's Solar Power Laboratory. "Now they are cheap enough that we don't have to worry about the cost of the panels. We are more interested in how they maintain their performance in different environments.

"A banker in Miami underwriting a photovoltaic system wants to know in dollars and cents how the system will perform in Miami and not in Phoenix, Arizona."

"The weather effects on photovoltaic systems in Arizona will be vastly different than those in Wisconsin or Louisiana," said Joseph Karas, co-author and materials science doctoral graduate now at the National Renewable Energy Lab. "The ability to collect data from a variety of climates and locations will support the development of universally effective solar cells and systems."

The research team was able to test its approach at ASU's Research Park facility, where the Solar Lab is primarily solar powered. For its next step, the lab is negotiating with a power plant in California that is looking to add a megawatt of silicon photovoltaics to its power profile.

The system, which can monitor reliability and lifespan remotely for larger, interconnected systems, will be a major breakthrough for the power industry.

"Most residential solar rooftop systems aren't owned by the homeowner, they are owned by a utility company or broker with a vested interest in monitoring photovoltaic efficiency," said Andre' Augusto, head of Silicon Heterojunction Research at ASU's Solar Power Laboratory and a co-author of the paper.

"Likewise, as developers of malls or even planned residential communities begin to incorporate solar power into their construction projects, the interest in monitoring at scale will increase, " Augusto said.

According to Bowden, it's all about the data, especially when it can be monitored automatically and remotely—data for the bankers, data for developers, and data for the utility providers.

If Bill Gates' smart city, planned about 30 miles from Phoenix in Buckeye, Ariz., uses the team's measurement technology, "It could become the IoT of Photovoltaics," said Bowden.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

Figure 1: Solution architecture with AWS IoT core

Critical and high-value assets are always on the move, and this holds across practically every industry vertical relying on supply chain and logistics operations. Naturally, enterprises seek ways to track their assets with the shipment carrier in ways that are most optimal to their requirements. The end goal is often to have greater visibility and control of assets while in transit with the shipment carrier while opening up opportunities to optimize business operations based on insights-driven decisions.

For assets in transit, proactive shipment monitoring results in greater reliability of the shipment's integrity by way of real-time updates about the shipment's location, transit status, and conditions like temperature and humidity (for perishable shipments). All this information helps quick issue identification and remediation by the respective stakeholders. This helps minimize losses and reduced insurance claims, which results in further cost optimization for the enterprise while delivering a delightful purchase experience to their customers.

A solution to address such requirements would need to be an IoT (Internet of Things) solution requiring a combination of tracker devices (hardware), cloud apps (software platform), enterprise systems integrations (with SCM, ERP & similar systems), and professional services & support for field installation & continuous data insights. For most enterprises, this implementation of the Internet of things is complex and non-core. Such an IoT solution requires the investment of capital, time, and expertise to build and deploy such a solution, especially one that's secure and scalable.

In this post, we'll discuss such an IoT solution that is built using AWS IoT Core and can be delivered in an affordable manner such that it's ready to use within a matter of days or weeks. The solution leverages GPS-enabled tracker hardware comprising condition monitoring sensors like temperature, humidity, shock impact, and ambient light. This device can be used to track entire containers or pallets having multiple cartons or even individual item boxes depending on the requirements. The shock impact sensor on the device indicates asset mishandling based on threshold limits, and the light sensor can indicate potentially unauthorized use/asset theft. Such a device requires a cellular connectivity service to communicate sensor data to the cloud per pre-configured rules.

By way of API integrations using AWS SDKs for the Internet of things, the tracker devices are first connected and authenticated. The data they generate is published to a cloud app powered by AWS IoT Core in real-time or at preset time intervals. The data sent to the cloud app is in JSON-format message payloads sent via the MQTT protocol supported by AWS IoT Core; and is presented on the Frontend Dashboard UI in a rich, interactive manner on a map interface with sensor-specific information available within a couple of taps/clicks.

These sensor data messages are further forwarded to other back-end systems like AWS IoT Analytics. The data is usually saved in a time-series data store for analysis and insights later in time. Additionally, API integrations can also be easily built for the cloud app to work with enterprise apps like Transport Management Systems and Warehouse Management Systems to realize autonomous supply chain operations. Business rules define such movement of data- and operations-specific logic and is handled via AWS's Rules Engine service, which also can be used to transform device data before forwarding it to a different application.

However, not every data point a sensor picks up needs to be sent to the cloud app unless such a mandate exists, often due to regulatory compliance requirements in verticals like healthcare and pharmaceuticals. The Dashboard UI on the cloud provides a simple interface to set ranges of minimum and maximum sensor readings acceptable. Any breach of this range is immediately notified as an alert to the team responsible for monitoring the shipment. The team can then contact the shipment carrier to take corrective action. Such ranges can also be separately configured within mere seconds for each shipment per its monitoring requirements.

The secure bidirectional messaging between the tracker device and the cloud app is enabled via AWS IoT Core's Device Gateway, which scales automatically to process millions of messages in either direction while ensuring low latency mission-critical applications.

This makes the purpose-built shipment monitoring solution completely configurable and hence scalable while still being quickly deployable without the hassles of capital expenses and significant resource time spent in custom building such solutions from scratch.

Summary

The intelligent shipment monitoring solution enables enterprises to have greater control over the movement of their assets while having enough data and insights over time to optimize business operations as required.

With AWS IoT Core and AWS IoT Analytics, such a data-driven outcome approach to handle supply chain operations delivers transformational benefits such as reduced losses, greater cost control, and improved customer satisfaction rates that can result in sustainable competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

As industrial organizations connect more devices, enable more remote access, and build new applications, the airgap approach to protecting industrial networks against cyber threats is no longer sufficient. As industries are becoming more digital, cyberattacks are getting more sophisticated, and yet many organizations are lagging in the adoption of updated and reliable industrial cybersecurity postures. And when these organization’s security leaders start building a strategy to secure operations beyond the industrial demilitarized zone (IDMZ), they realize it might not be as simple as they thought.

Industrial assets (as well as industrial networks, in many cases) are managed by the operations team, which is typically focused on production integrity, continuity, and physical safety, rather than cyber safety. The IT teams often have the required cybersecurity skills and experience but generally lack the operations context and the knowledge of the industrial processes that are required to take security measures without disrupting production.

Building a secure industrial network requires strong collaboration between IT and operations teams. Only together can they appreciate what needs to be protected and how best to protect it. Only together can they implement security best practices to build secure industrial operations.

Enhancing the security of industrial networks will not happen overnight: IT and operations teams have to build their relationship; new security tools might have to be deployed; networks might need to be upgraded and segmented; new correlation policies will have to be developed.

Security is a journey. Only a phased and pragmatic approach can lay the ground for a converged IT/OT security architecture. Each phase must be an opportunity to build the foundation for the next. This will ensure your industrial security project addresses crucial security needs at minimal costs. It will also help you raise skills and maturity levels throughout the organization to gain wide acceptance and ensure effective collaboration.

Being the leader in both the cybersecurity and industrial networking markets, we looked at the successful projects Cisco has been involved in. This led us to recommend a three-step journey outlined in Cisco’s Industrial Security Validated Design.

What is a Cisco Validated Design (CVD)? CVDs provide the foundation for systems design based on common use cases or current engineering system priorities. They incorporate a broad set of technologies, features, and applications to address customer needs. Each one has been comprehensively tested and documented by Cisco engineers to ensure faster, more reliable, and fully predictable deployment.

Our approach to industrial security is focused on crucial needs, while creating a framework for IT and operations to build an effective and collaborative workflow. It enables protection against the most common devastating cybersecurity threats, at optimized cost. And provides a practical approach to simplify adoption.

To learn more, read our solution brief or watch the replay of the webinar I just presented. A detailed design and implementation guide will be available soon for helping to accelerate proof-of-concepts and deployment efforts.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…
Fig.1 Arrow Shield 96 Trusted Platform

Introduction

IoT product development crosses several domains of expertise from embedded design to communication protocols and cloud computing. Because of this complexity “end-to-end” or “edge-to-cloud” IoT security is becoming a challenging concept in the industry. Edge in many cases refers to the device as a single element in the edge-to-cloud chain. But the device must not be regarded as a whole when security requirements are defined. Trust must first be established within the processing unit and propagated through several layers of the software stack before the device becomes a trusted end node. Securing the processor requires to properly integrate multiple layers of security and use security features implemented in hardware. Embedded security expertise and experience is required to accomplish such tasks. It is very easy to put a lot of effort on implementing security for an IoT product and in the same time missing to cover key use cases. A simpler way to narrowing down on defining the end-to-end security is to start with identifying the minimum set of business requirements.

Brand image, how a company’s customers perceive and value it, is one of the most valuable assets of any corporation. Two of the most important characteristics of an IoT device that can promote a positive brand image are: resiliency and privacy. For resiliency, this might mean adding features that increase the device’s ability to self-recover from malfunctions or cyber-attacks. For privacy, this means protecting user information and data but also the intellectual property (IP), the product invested in the product. This means that preventing exploitation through vectors such as product\device cloning and over production becomes important. Another business driver is the overall cost of ownership for the product. Are there security related features that can drive the cost down? We include here not just operational cost but also liabilities.

In this blog, we dive deeper into solutions that support these business requirements. We will also discuss a demo we have created in collaboration with our partners Sequitur Labs and Arrow to demonstrate a commercially available approach to solving a number of several security use cases for IoT.

Security in depth – a methodical approach for securing connected products

IoT security must start with securing the device, so that data, data collection, and information processing can be trusted. Security must be applied in layers and facilitate trust propagation from the silicon hardware root of trust (HWRoT) to the public/private cloud or the application provider back-end. Furthermore, the connected paradigm provides the opportunity to delegate access control and security monitoring in the cloud, outside of the device. Narrowing down further, device security must be rooted by enabling fundamental capabilities of the processor or system on chip and consider all three stages of the device lifecycle: inception (manufacturing, first boot), operation, and decommissioning.

In a nutshell we should consider the following layers for securing any IoT product:

  • Set a hardware root of trust – secure programming and provisioning (firmware, key material, fuses)
  • Implement hardware enforced isolation – system partitioning secure / non-secure
  • Design secure boot – authenticated boot chain all the way to an authenticated kernel
  • Build for resiliency – fail-safe to an alternative firmware image and restore from off-board location
  • Enable Trusted Execution – establish a logical secure enclave
  • Abstract hardware security – streamline application development
  • Enable security monitoring – cloud based, actionable security monitoring for a fleets of devices

These capabilities provide a foundation sufficient to fulfill the most common security requirements of any IoT product.

Embedded security features needed to build the security layers described above are available today from many silicon providers. However, software is needed to turn these into a usable framework for application developers to easily implement higher layer security use cases without the need for advanced silicon expertise.

Such software products must be architected to be easily ported to diverse silicon designs. Secondly, the software solution must work with the established IoT manufacturing process. “Turning on” embedded security features triggers changes to existing manufacturing flows to accommodate hardware testing before final firmware image can be programmed, burning fuses in the silicon in a specific order and overall handling sensitive cryptographic key material. The fragmentation, complexity, and expertise required are the reasons why embedded security is a challenge to implement at scale in IoT today.

A closer look – commercially available secure platform with Arrow Shield96

AWS partnered with Sequitur Labs and Arrow to provide a commercial solution that follows the approach described in the previous paragraph. This solution follows the NIST SP 800-193 for Platform Firmware Resilience Guidelines and goes beyond to create a secure platform fitted for embedded and IoT products. In the same time it is abstracting the complexity of understanding and utilizing embedded security IP such as hardware crypto, random number generators, fuse controllers, tampers, hardware integrity checkers, TrustZone, on-the-fly memory encryption.

For this blog, we created a demo using the Arrow Shield 96 Trusted Platform (Fig 1) single board computer running Sequitur Labs custom firmware image based on the EmSPARK Security Suite. The Arrow Shield96 board is based on the Microchip SAMD27, a Cortex A5 entry level MPU that embeds a set of security IP capable to fulfill the most stringent security requirements.

Let’s dive deeper into the technical implementation first then into the demo scenarios that fulfill some of customers’ business needs.

Security inception and propagation of trust

Secure boot and firmware provisioning

Introducing secure boot requires initial programming of the CPU, essentially burning keys in the processor’s fuses, setting up the boot configuration, establishing the Hardware Root of Trust, and ensuring the processor only boots authenticated, trusted firmware. Secure boot implementation is tightly correlated to the processor programming and the device firmware provisioning. The following section provides details how secure boot and firmware provisioning can be done properly to establish a trusted security foundation for any application.

Firmware provisioning

EmSPARK Security Suite methodology for provisioning and programming the Shield96 board minimizes complexity and the need for embedded security expertise. It provides a tool and software building blocks that guide the device makers to create an encrypted manufacturing firmware image first. The manufacturing firmware image packages the final components: encrypted blobs of the final device firmware, a provisioning application, and customer specific key material such as private key and X.509 certificate for cloud connectivity, certificate authorities to authenticate firmware components and application updates.
The actual firmware provisioning and CPU programming is performed automatically during the very first boot of the device flashed with the manufacturing image. With the CPU running in secure mode the provisioning application burns the necessary CPU fuses and generates keys using the embedded TRNG (true random number generator) to uniquely encrypt the software components that together form the final firmware. Such components are the Trusted Execution Environment (CoreTEE), Linux kernel, customer applications, Trusted Applications, and key material (such as key material needed to authenticate with AWS IoT Core).

The output – establishing a trusted foundation

The result is firmware encrypted uniquely with a key derived from the HWRoT for each device in a process that does not leave room for device secrets mismanagement or human error. Device diversification achieved this way drastically reduces the cost of manufacturing by eliminating the need for HSMs and secure facilities while providing protection from class break attacks (break one break all).
Another task the provisioning process performs during the very first boot is creating and securely storing a unique device certificate from a preloaded CSR (Certificate Signing Request) template and a key pair generated using the HW TRNG then signed with a customer provided private key only usable securely during the device first boot. The device certificate serves as the immutable device identity for cloud authentication.

Secure boot

The secure boot implemented creates the system partitioning in secure and non-secure domains making sure all peripherals are set to the desired domain. Arm TrustZone and Microchip security IP are at the core of the implementation. CoreTEE, the operating system for the secure domain runs in on-the-fly AES encrypted DDR memory. This protects a critical software component (the TEE) from memory probing attacks. Secure boot has been designed so at the end of the boot process, before handing over control of the processor from the secure domain to the non-secure domain (Linux) to close access to the fuse controller, secure JTAG, and other peripherals that can be leveraged to breach the security.

Building for resilience

Secure boot implements two features that boost device resilience – a fail-over boot from a secondary image (B) when primary boot (A) fails, and the ability to restore a known good image (A) from an off-board location. The solution includes a hardware watchdog and a boot-loop counter (as set by the device maker) that Linux resets to maximum after each successful boot. If Linux fails to boot repeatedly and the counter reaches zero the B partition is set for the next boot. After such failure once the failover boot B is loaded, the device connects to an off-board location (in our demo that is a repository on AWS) retrieves the latest firmware image and re-installs it as the primary one (A). These two features help to reduce operational cost by allowing devices in the field to self-heal. In addition, AWS IoT Device Defender checks device behaviors for ongoing analysis and triggers alerts when behaviors deviate from expected ranges.

In our demo when the alternative firmware image (B) is loaded, an event is triggered in the AWS IoT Device Defender agent. The AWS IoT Device Defender agent running as a TA in the secure domain sends these events to the AWS IoT Device Defender Detect service for evaluation. The TA, running in the secure domain, also signs AWS IoT Device Defender messages to facilitate integrity validation for each reported event.

Another key component of the EmSPARK Suite is the secure update process. Since secure boot is the only process that can decrypt firmware components during device start it is also involved in performing the firmware update. The firmware update feature is facilitated in Linux as an API call that requires a manifest and the signed and/or encrypted new firmware image. The API call performs image signature verification and sets the flag for the boot to update and restarts the board. During next boot the secure boot process decrypts the new image using a pre-provisioned key and re-encrypts it with the board-specific key. The manifest indicates which components need to be updated – Linux Kernel, TEE, TAs and/or bootloader.

Enabling easy development through security abstraction

Arrow Shield through the EmSPARK Suite product preloads a number of TAs (Trusted Applications) with the Shield96 firmware. The figure below is a view of the dual domain implementation and the software components provided with the Shield96 Trusted product in our demo.

8275351859?profile=RESIZE_710x

Fig 2. Software architecture enabling TrustZone\TEE with EmSPARK Suite

These TAs expose a set of secure functions to Linux via a C SDK (called the CoreLocker APIs). The Arrow board and Sequitur’s security suite preloads the following TAs for our demo:

  • Cryptographic engine – providing symmetric, asymmetric crypto operations and key generation integrating silicon-specific hardware crypto
    Key-store and a CA-store managed (add, delete) via signed commands
  • Secure firmware update
  • Secure storage for files and stream data
  • TLS and MQTT stacks
  • AWS IoT Device Defender secure agent

In addition, a tamper detection and remediation TA has been added for our demo purposes (as detailed in “The demo” section below). These TAs provide a preloaded framework for implementing a comprehensive set of security use cases assuring that security operations are executed in isolation from the application OS in an authenticated and resilient environment. Such use cases include confidentiality, authentication and authorization, access control, attestation, privacy, integrity protection, device health monitoring, secure communication with the cloud or other devices, secure lifecycle management.

All TA functions are made available to application development through a set of C APIs via an SDK. Developers do not need to understand the complexity of creating TAs or using HW security provided by the chipset.

Translating TAs to security use cases

Through a securely managed CA-store (Certificate Authority) the device can authenticate payloads against a set of CAs optionally loaded at manufacturing or later in the device lifecycle. Having the ability to update securely the CAs the device or product owner can transfer the ownership of certain functions such as firmware update or application update to other entities. For example, the customer owns the applications but the firmware update and security management may be delegated to a third party Managed Service Provider while maintaining privacy requirements.
The cryptographic engine is core to anything related to security and implement a set of symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic functions and key generation allowing applications in non-secure domain to execute crypto in isolation. HW crypto is used when implemented by the chipset.

The Microchip SAMA5D2 implements in hardware the ability to monitor in real time regions of memory. In the Shield96 firmware this feature – ICM, Integrity Check Monitoring – is used to monitor the integrity of the Linux kernel. Any modification of the Linux kernel triggers an interrupt in the secure domain. The hardware isolation implemented through TrustZone prevents Linux to even “be aware” of such interrupts. The interrupt triggers a remediation function implemented in a TA and together with the Device Defender Secure Agent TA that does three operations:

  • records the tampering event and restarts Linux from the verified, authenticated encrypted image provided through secure boot
  • after restart packages the tampering event into a JSON format, signs it for integrity assurance and stores it
  • publishes the JSON package to the AWS IoT Device Defender monitoring service

Complementing the edge-to-cloud security strategy with AWS IoT Device Defender

AWS IoT Device Defender audits device cloud configuration based on security best practices and monitors anomalies and threats on devices based on expected cloud- and device-side behaviors on an ongoing basis. In this demo and for complementing the defense mechanisms implemented at the device level, AWS IoT Device Defender performs its monitoring capability and enables customers to receive alerts when it evaluates that anomalous or threat events occurred on an end-node. This demo required installing AWS IoT Device Defender agents on both the non-secure and secure domains of the Shield96 board. The security domain is providing the secure crypto signature (using securely a private key) to device health reports and also isolates the detection and reporting processes from being intercepted by malicious applications. AWS IoT Device Defender agent collects monitored behaviors in the forms of metrics from both domains; then from the secure domain, AWS IoT Device Defender agent sends the metrics to the AWS Cloud for evaluation.

The Demo

For a full demo tutorial, please watch this video .

8275363691?profile=RESIZE_710x

Fig. 3 Edge-to-cloud IoT security demo at Arrow Embedded to Go 2020

The demo covers the following scenarios:

  • Out of the box experience
  • Firmware personalization – secure firmware rotation to provide a logistical separation between manufacturing and production firmware
  • Device registration to AWS IoT Core
  • Device decommissioning (de-registration) from AWS IoT Core
  • Secure firmware update
  • Resilience demonstration – tamper event simulation and remediation
  • Event reporting to AWS IoT Device Defender

Demonstrating resilience and tamper violation reporting with AWS IoT Device Defender

The boot logic for the demo includes a safety check for tamper events. In this case, we connected a button to an environmental tamper pin. The tamper violation generated by the button press is detected in the next boot sequence so the initial boot code switches to the secondary boot stack, and proceeds to boot the “fail-safe” boot image. Once booted the system will publish the tamper event to AWS IoT Device Defender for logging and analysis. In the demo, the primary and secondary images are identical, so each tamper event simply switches to the other. This allows the demo scenario to be repeated with each tamper event switching the system from A to B or B to A firmware images.

Streamlining personalized firmware to commercial boards

The commercial solution introduced by Arrow with the Shiled96 board includes a cloud based secure firmware rotation from the manufacturing generic firmware using AWS thus streamlining device personalization and providing a production ready device to a multitude of customers.

Out of manufacturing, the Shield96 Trusted board comes preloaded with a minimum and generic version of Linux. The out of the box experience to get to a personalized and up to date firmware is as simple as inserting an SD card and connecting the board to the Internet. The device boots securely, partitions the SD card then using Just-in-Time Registration of Device Certificates on AWS IoT (JITR) registers the device to AWS IoT Core and provisions it to Sequitur’s AWS IoT Core endpoint and to the Sandbox application. Next, the device automatically downloads the most recent generic or customer-specific file system, installs it and restarts. Thus the Sandbox provides lifecycle device management and firmware updates.

The 2-stage firmware deployment starting with a generic preloaded firmware at Arrow Programming Center followed by a cloud based final firmware rotation gives customers valuable features. For instance, an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)\Original Device Manufacturer (ODM) may need to produce devices with firmware variations for deployment in different geographical regions or customized for different customers. Alternatively, the OEM\ODM may want to optimize logistics, manufacture in volume while the firmware is still in development, and load the final firmware in a distribution facility before shipping to customers. It also eliminates the opportunity for IP theft in manufacturing since the final firmware is never present at the manufacturer.

Conclusion

The solution introduced with this blog demonstrates that manufacturers can produce devices at scale while security is implemented properly, taking full advantage of the silicon embedded security IP. This implementation extends niche expertise and years of experience into a framework accessible to any developer.
Why is this important? Advanced security implemented right, massively reduces time to market and cost; the solution is also highly portable to other silicon. Sequitur Lab’s EmSPARK Security Suite is already available for NXP microprocessors (i.MX and QuorIQ Layerscape families) and nVidia Xavier bringing the same level of abstraction to IoT and embedded developers.
In this relationship Arrow proposes a secure single board computer fully provisioned. Arrow adds greater value by offering the ability to customize the hardware and the firmware. Customers can choose to add or remove hardware components, customize the Linux kernel, and subscribe for firmware management and security monitoring.
APN partners complement existing AWS services to enable customers in deploying a comprehensive security architecture and a seamless experience. In this case, Sequitur Labs and Arrow bring to market a game changing product complementing existing AWS edge and cloud services to enable any project of any size to use advanced security without the need for qualified embedded security experts.
Moreover, the product builds on top of HW security features of existing processors while providing the necessary software tools and process to work with existing manufacturing flows and not require secure manufacturing.
For a deeper dive into this solution the Getting Started Guide on the AWS Partner Device Catalog provides board bring up steps and example code for many of the supported use cases.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

 

As small as a postage stamp, the Seeeduino XIAO boasts a 32-bit Arm Cortex-M0+ processor running at 48 MHz with 256 KB of flash memory and 32 KB of SRAM.

A couple of months ago, I penned a column, The Worm Turns, in which I revealed that — although I’d been bravely fighting my urges — my will had crumbled and I had decided to create a display comprising a 12 x 12 = 144 array of ping pong balls, each illuminated with a tricolor WS2818 LED (a.k.a. a NeoPixel).

8221240097?profile=RESIZE_400x

The author proudly presenting his 12 x 12 ping pong ball array (Click image to see a larger version — Image source: Max Maxfield)

First, I found a pack of 144 ping pong balls on Amazon for only $11. I ordered two cartons because I knew I would need some spares. Of course, this immediately tempted me to increase the size of my array to 15 = 15 = 225 ping pong balls, but I’d already ordered 150 NeoPixels in the form of five meters of 30 pixels/meter strips from Adafruit, so I decided to stick with the original plan, which we will call “Plan A” so no one gets confused.

Thank goodness I restrained myself, because the 12 x 12 array is proving to be a lot more work than I expected — a 15 x 15 array would have brought me to my knees.

The next step was to build a 2-ball prototype because I wanted to see whether it was best to attach the NeoPixel to the outside of the ball (the fast-and-easy option) or inside the ball (the slow-and-painful alternative). Although you can’t see it from the picture or from this video, there is a slight but noticeable difference in the real-world, and one method is indeed better than the other — can you guess which one?

8221246481?profile=RESIZE_400x

A prototype using two ping pong balls (Click image to see a larger version — Image source: Max Maxfield)

Have you ever tried to drill 3/8” holes into 144 ping pong balls? Me neither. Over the years, I’ve learned a thing or two, and one of the things I’ve learned is that drilling holes in ping pong balls always ends in tears. Thus, I ended up cutting these holes using a small pair of curved nail scissors (there’s one long evening I’ll never see again).

The reason for using the strips is that this is the cheapest way to purchase NeoPixels with associated capacitors in the easiest-to-use form. Unfortunately, the ball-to-ball spacing (43 mm) on the board is greater than the pixel-to-pixel spacing (33 mm) on the strip. This means chopping the strip into segments, attaching each segment to its associated ping pong ball, and then connecting adjacent segments together using three wires. So, 144 x 3 = 432 short wires to strip and solder. Do you have any idea how long this takes? I do!

8221247276?profile=RESIZE_400x

The Seeeduino XIAO is the size of a small postage stamp (Click image to see a larger version — Image source: Seeed Studio)

Now, you may have noticed that I was driving my 2-ball prototype with an Arduino Uno, but this is too large to be used in my array. In the past, I would have been tempted to use an Arduino Nano, which is reasonably small and not-too-expensive. On the other hand, the fact that this is an 8-bit processor running at only 16 MHz with only 32 KB of flash memory and only 2 KB of SRAM would limit the effects I could achieve.

Sometimes (rarely) the fates decide to roll the dice in one’s favor. In this case, while I was pondering which processor to employ, the folks from Seeed Studio contacted me to tell me about their Seeeduino XIAO.

OMG! This little rapscallion — which is only the size of a small postage stamp and costs only $5 — is awesome! In addition to a 32-bit Arm Cortex-M0+ processor running at 48 MHz, this bodacious beauty boasts 256 KB of flash memory and 32 KB of SRAM.

As an aside, it’s important to note is that the Seeeduino XIAO’s programming connector is USB Type-C, which means you’re going to need a USB-A to USB Type-C cable.

8221253899?profile=RESIZE_584x

The Seeeduino XIAO’s 11 input/output pins pack a punch (Click image to see a larger version — Image source: Seeed Studio)

In addition to its power and ground pins, the Seeeduino XIAO has 11 data pins, each of which can act as an analog input or a digital input/output (I/O). Furthermore, one of these pins can by driven by an internal digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and act as a true analog output, while the other pins can be used to provide I2C, SPI, and UART interfaces.

Sad to relate, there is one small fly in the soup or a large elephant in the room (I’m feeling generous today, so I’ll let you pick the metaphor you prefer). The problem is that, although it can be powered with the same 5 V supply as the NeoPixels, the Seeeduino XIAO’s I/O pins use a 3.3 V interface, but the NeoPixels require 5 V data signals, so we need some way to convert between the two.

In the past, I would probably have used a full-up bidirectional logic level converter, like the 4-channel BOB (breakout board) from SparkFun, but I only need a single unidirectional signal, so this seems a bit of overkill.

Happily, I recently ran across an awesome hack on Hackaday.com that provides a simple solution requiring only a single general-purpose IN4001 diode.

8221260061?profile=RESIZE_584x

A cheap-and-cheerful voltage level converter hack (Click image to see a larger version — Image source: Max Maxfield)

The way this works is rather clever. From the NeoPixel’s data sheet we learn that a logic 1 is considered to be 0.7 * Vcc. Since we are powering our NeoPixels with 5 V, this means a logic 1 will be 0.7 * 5 = 3.5 V, which is higher than the XIAO’s 3.3 V digital output. Bummer!

Actually, if the truth be told, there is some “wriggle room” here, and the 3.3 V signal from the XIAO might work, but are we the sort of people for whom “might” is good enough? Of course we aren’t!

The solution is to add a “sacrificial NeoPixel” at the beginning of the chain, and to power this pixel via our IN4001 diode. Since the IN4001 has a forward voltage drop of 0.7 V, the first NeoPixel will see a Vcc of 5 – 0.7 = 4.3 V. Remember that the NeoPixel considers a logic 1 to be 0.7 * Vcc, so this first NeoPixel will accept anything above 0.7 * 4.3 = 3.01 V as being a logic 1. Meanwhile, the next NeoPixel in the chain will see the 4.3 V data signal coming out of the first NeoPixel as being a valid logic 1. Pretty clever, eh?

I’m currently about half of the way through wiring everything up. I cannot wait to see my array light up for the first time. Once everything is up and running, I will return to regale you with more details. Until that frabjous day, I will delight to hear your comments, questions, and suggestions.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

Ever wanted the power of the all new Raspberry Pi 4 Single Board Computer, but in a smaller form factor? With more options to expand the I/Os and its functions? Well, The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 (a.k.a. CM4) got you covered! In this article, we’ll be taking a deep dive into the all-new CM4, see what’s new and how different the latest iteration is from its predecessor, CM3.

Introduction - The System on Module Architecture

The CM4 can be described as a ‘stripped-down’ version of the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, which contains the same processor, memory, eMMC flash memory and the power regulation circuitry built-in. The CM4 looks almost like a breakout board with two connectors underneath, hence the name “System on Module (SoM)”. However, what differs the CM4 (all compute modules for that matter) from the regular Raspberry Pi 4 is that the CM4 does not come equipped with any hardware I/O ports such as USB, Ethernet and HDMI, but offers access to all the useful I/O pins of the cpu to be utilized to connect external peripherals that the designers include in their circuit designs. This offers the ultimate freedom to the designers and developers to use the computing power of the Raspberry Pi 4, while reducing the overall cost of their designs by only having to use what’s necessary in their designs.

 

What’s New In The CM4?

The key difference with the CM4, at first glance, is the form factor of the module. The previous versions, including the CM3 were designed to have the DDR2-SODIMM (mechanically compatible) form factor which looked like a laptop RAM stick. The successor, CM4 comes in a smaller form factor, with 2x 100-pin High-Density connector which can be ‘popped-on’ to the receiving board.

8221226476?profile=RESIZE_710x

Key Features

The CM4 comes in 32 different variants which has varying Flash and RAM options and optional wireless connectivity. Similar to the predecessors, there is also a CM4Lite version, which does not come with a built-in eMMC memory, reducing the cost of the module to a minimum of $25. However, all the variants of CM4 are equipped with following key features:

 
  • Broadcom BCM2711, Quad Core Cortex-A72 (Arm V8) 64-bit System on Chip, running at 1.5 GHz

  • 1/2/4/8GB LPDDR4 RAM options

  • 0(CM4Lite)/8/16/32GB of eMMC storage options (upto 100MB/s bandwidth)

  • Smaller footprint of 55mm x 40mm x 4.7mm (w x l x h)

  • Supports H.265 (4Kp60 Decode); H.264 (1080p60fps Decode, 1080p30fps Encode) using OpenGL ES 3.0 graphics

  • Radio Module

  • 2.4/5GHz IEEE 802.11 b/g/n/ac Wireless (optional)

  • Bluetooth 5.0 BLE

  • On-board selector to switch between PCB trace antenna and external antenna

  • On-board Gigabit Ethernet PHY supporting IEEE 1588 standard

  • 1x PCI Express Gen2.0 lane (5Gbps)

  • 2x HDMI2.0 ports (upto 4k60fps)

  • 1x USB 2.0 port (480MBps)

  • 28x GPIO pins, with the support on both 1.8V or 3.3V logic levels along with the peripheral options:

  • 2x PWM channels

  • 3x GPCLK

  • 6x UART (Serial)

  • 6x I2C

  • 5x SPI

  • 1x SDIO interface

  • 1x DPI

  • 1x PCM

  • MIPI DSI (Serial Display)

  • 1x 2-lane MIPI DSI display port

  • 1x 4-lane MIPI DSI display port

  • MIPI CSI-2 (Serial Camera)

  • 1x 2-lane MIPI CSI camera port

  • 1x 4-lane MIPI CSI camera port

  • 1x +5V Power Supply Input (on-board regulator circuitry available)

 

The Applications - DIY? Industrial?

The CM4 can be integrated into end products, designed and prototyped using the full-size Raspberry Pi 4 SBC. This allows the removal of unused ports, peripherals and components which reduces the overall cost and complexity. Therefore application ideas are virtually limitless and range all the way from DIY projects such as the PiBoy to industrial IoT designs such as integrated home automation systems, small scale hosting servers, data exchange hubs and portable electronics which require the processing power offered by the CM4, all while maintaining the smaller form factor and power consumption. Compute Module Clusters such as the Turing Pi 2, which harnesses the power of multiple Compute Modules are also an option with this powerful, yet small System on Module, the Raspberry Pi CM4.

 

How Can I Use Upswift Solutions On My Compute Module 4 Based Design?

Upswift offers hassle-free management solutions for all Linux-based embedded systems (CM4 included), by providing you a one-click solution to monitor, control and manage all your connected devices, from one place.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

On-chip UHD SS–MSCs as a device-unitized power source. Credit: Professor Sang-Young Lee, UNIST

by Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology

A tiny microsupercapacitor (MSC) that is as small as the width of a person's fingerprint and can be integrated directly with an electronic chip has been developed. This has attracted major attention as a novel technology to lead the era of Internet of Things (IoT) since it can be driven independently when applied to individual electronic components.

 

Through the study, Professor Sang-Young Lee and his research team in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST have unveiled a new class of ultrahigh areal number density solid-state MSCs (UHD SS–MSCs) on a chip via electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing. According to the research team, this is the first study to exploit EHD jet printing in the MSCs.

A supercapacitor (SC), also known as an ultracapacitor, can store much more energy than ordinary capacitors. The benefits of supercapacitors include having high power delivery and longer cycle life compared to lithium-based secondary batteries. In particular, it can be produced as small as the width of a person's fingerprint via semiconductor manufacturing process, and thus can be also applicable for wearables and internet of things (IoT) devices.

However, becuase the heat produced in manufacturing process may cause deterioration of the electrical characteristics of the supercapacitor, it has been difficult to connect them directly to electronic components. In addition, the fabrication method that combines supercapacitors with electronic components via inkjet printing technique has also the disadvantage of lower precision.

The research team solved this issue using EHD jet printing, a high-resolution patterning technique in microelectronics. EHD jet printing uses the electrode and electrolyte for printing purpose similar to that of conventional inkjet printing, yet it can control printed liquid with an electric field.

"We were able to produce up to 54.9 unit cells per square centimeter (cm2) via electro-hydrodynamic jet printing technique, and thus the output of 65.9 volts (V) was achieved in the same area," says Kwonhyung Lee (Combined M.S/Ph.D. of Energy and Chemical Engineering, UNIST), the first author of the study.

The team also succeeded in fabricating 36 unit cells on a chip (area = 8.0 mm × 8.2 mm, 54.9 cells cm−2) and areal operating voltage (65.9 V cm−2) that lie far beyond those of previously reported MSCs fabricated by printing techniques. Besides, upon exposure to hot temperature (80 degrees C), these cells maintained normal cyclic voltammetry (CV) profiles, and thus has proven they can withstand excessive heat generated during the operation of actual electronic component. In addition, these batteries can provide customized powere supplies, as they can be connected either in series or parallel.

"In this study, we have demonstrated on-chip UHD SS–MSCs fabricated via EHD jet printing," says Professor Lee. "The on-chip UHD SS–MSCs presented here hold great promise as a new platform technology for miniaturized monolithic power sources with customized design and tunable electrochemical properties."

Originaly posted HERE

 
Read more…

PYNQ is great for accelerating Python applications in programmable logic. Let's take a look at how we can use it with OpenMV camera.

Things used in this project

Hardware:

  • Avnet Ultra96-V2 (Can also use V1 or V3)
  • OpenMV Cam M7
  • Avnet Ultra96 (Can use V1 or V2)

Software:

  • Xilinx PYNQ Framework

Introduction

Image processing is required for a range of applications from vision guided robotics to machine vision in industrial applications.

In this project we are going to look at how we can fuse the OpenMV camera with the Ultra96 running PYNQ. This will allow out PYNQ application to offload some image processing to the camera. Doing so will provide a higher performance system and open the Ultra96 using PYNQ to be able to work with the OpenMV ecosystem.

 

What Is the OpenMV Camera 

The OpenMV camera is a low cost machine vision camera which is developed using Python. Thanks to this architecture of the OpenMV Camera we can therefore offload some of the image processing to the camera. Meaning the image frames received by our Ultra96 already have faces identified, eyes tracked or Sobel filtering, it all depends on how we set up the OpenMV Camera.

As the OpenMV camera has been designed to be extensible it provides 10 external IO which can be used to drive external sensors. These 10 are able to support a range of interfaces from UART to SPI, I2C and PWM. Of course the PWM is very useful for driving servos.

On very useful feature of the OpenMV camera is its LEDs mine (OpenMV M7) provides a tri-colour LED which can be used to output Red, Green, Blue and a separate IR LED. As the sensor is IR sensitive this can be useful for low light performance.

8100406101?profile=RESIZE_400xOpenMV Camera

How Does the OpenMV Camera Work

OpenMV Cam uses micro python to control the imager and output frames over the USB link. Micro python is intended for use on micro controllers and is based on Python 3.4. To use the OpenMV camera we need to first generate a micro python script which configures the camera for the given algorithm we wish to implement. We then execute this script by uploading and running it over the USB link.

This means we need some OpenMV APIs and libraries on a host machine to communicate with the OpenMV Camera.

To develop the script we want to be able to ensure it works, which is where the OpenMV IDE comes into its own, this allows us to develop and test the script which we later use in our Ultra96 application.

We can develop this script using either a Windows, MAC or Linux desktop.

 

Creating the OpenMV Script using the OpenMV IDE

To get started with the OpenMV IDE we frist need to download and install it. Once it is installed the next step is to connect our OpenMV camera to it using the USB link and then running a script on it.

To get started we can run the example hello world provided, which configures the camera to outputs standard RGB image at QVGA resolution. On the right hand side of the IDE you will be able to see the images output from the camera.

 

We can use this IDE to develop scripts for the OpenMV camera such as the one below which detects and identifies circles in the captured image.

Note the frame rate is lower when the camera is connected to the IDE.

 

We can use the scripts developed here in our Ultra96 PYNQ implementation let's take a look at how we set up the Ultra96 and PYNQ

Setting Up the Ultra96 PYNQ Image

The first thing we need to do if we have not already done it, is to download and create a PYNQ SD Card so we can run the PYNQ framework on the Ultra96.

As we want to use the Xilinx image processing overlay we should download the Ultra96 PYNQ v2.3 image.

Once you have this image creating a SD Card is very simple, extract the ISO image from the compressed file and write it to a SD Card. To write the ISO image to the SD Card we need a program such a etcher or win32 disk imager.

With a SD Card available we can then boot the Ultra96 and connect to the PYNQ framework using either

  • Use a USB Ethernet connection over the MicroUSB (upstream USB connection).
  • Connect via WiFi.
  • Use the Ultra96 as a single-board computer and connect a monitor, keyboard and mouse.

For this project I used the USB Ethernet connection.

The next thing to do is to ensure we have the necessary overlays to be able to accelerate image processing functions into the programmable logic. To to this we need to install the PYNQ computer vision overlay. 

Downloading the Image Processing Overlay

Installing this overlay is very straight forward. Open a browser window and connect to the web address of 192.168.3.1 (USB Ethernet address). This will open a log in page to the Jupyter notebooks, the password is Xilinx

 

Upon log in you will see the following folders and scripts

 

Click on new and select terminal, this will open a new terminal window in a browser window. To download and use the PYNQ Computer Vision overlays we enter the following command

sudo pip3 install --upgrade git+https://github.com/Xilinx/PYNQ-ComputerVision.git
 

Once these are downloaded if you look back at the Jupyter home page you will see a new directory called pynqOpenCV.

 

Using these Jupyter notebooks we can test the image processing performance when we accelerate OpenCV functions into the programmable logic.

 

Typically the hardware acceleration as can be seen in the image above greatly out performs implementing the algorithm in SW.

Of course we can call this overlay from our own Jupyter notebooks

 

Setting Up the OpenMV Camera in PYNQ

The next step is to configure the Ultra96 PYNQ instance to be able to control the OpenMV camera using its APIs. We can obtain these by downloading the OpenMV git repo using the command below in a terminal window on the Ultra96.

git clone https://github.com/openmv/openmv
 

Once this is downloaded we need to move the file pyopenmv.py

From openmv/tools

To /usr/lib/python3.6

This will allow us to control the OpenMV camera from within our Jupyter applications.

To be able to do this we need to know which serial port the OpenMV camera enumerates as. This will generally be ttyACM0 or ttyACM1 we can find this out by doing a LS of the /dev directory

 

Now we are ready to begin working with the OpenMV camera in our applications let's take a look at how we set it up our Jupyter Scripts

 

Initial Test of OpenMV Camera

The first thing we need to do in a new Jupyter notebook is to import the necessary packages. This includes the pyopenmv as we just installed.

We will alos be importing numpy as the image is returned as a numpy array so that we can display it using numpy functionality.

import pyopenmvimport timeimport sysimport numpy as np 

The first thing we need to do is define the script we developed in the IDE, for the "first light" with the PYNQ and OpenMV we will use the hello world script to obtain a simple image.

script = """

# Hello World Example

#

# Welcome to the OpenMV IDE! Click on the green run arrow button below to run the script!

import sensor, image, time

import pyb

sensor.reset()                      # Reset and initialize the sensor.

sensor.set_pixformat(sensor.RGB565) # Set pixel format to RGB565 (or GRAYSCALE)

sensor.set_framesize(sensor.QVGA)   # Set frame size to QVGA (320x240)

sensor.skip_frames(time = 2000)     # Wait for settings take effect.

clock = time.clock()                # Create a clock object to track the FPS.

red_led = pyb.LED(1)

red_led.off()

red_led.on()

while(True):

   clock.tick() 

   img = sensor.snapshot()         # Take a picture and return the image.

"""

Once the script is defined the next thing we need to do is connect to the OpenMV camera and download the script.

 

portname = "/dev/ttyACM0"

connected = False

pyopenmv.disconnect()

for i in range(10):

   try:

       # opens CDC port.

       # Set small timeout when connecting

       pyopenmv.init(portname, baudrate=921600, timeout=0.050)

       connected = True

       break

   except Exception as e:

       connected = False

       sleep(0.100)

if not connected:

   print ( "Failed to connect to OpenMV's serial port.\n"

           "Please install OpenMV's udev rules first:\n"

           "sudo cp openmv/udev/50-openmv.rules /etc/udev/rules.d/\n"

           "sudo udevadm control --reload-rules\n\n")

   sys.exit(1)

# Set higher timeout after connecting for lengthy transfers.

pyopenmv.set_timeout(1*2) # SD Cards can cause big hicups.

pyopenmv.stop_script()

pyopenmv.enable_fb(True)

pyopenmv.exec_script(script)

Finally once the script has been downloaded and is executing, we want to be able to read out the frame buffer. This Cell below reads out the framebuffer and saves it as a jpg file in the PYNQ file system.

 

running = True

import numpy as np

from PIL import Image

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

while running:

   fb = pyopenmv.fb_dump()

   if fb != None:

       img = Image.fromarray(fb[2], 'RGB')

       img.save("frame.jpg")

       img = Image.open("frame.jpg")

       img

       time.sleep(0.100)

 

When I ran this script the first light image below was received of me working in my office.

 

Having achieved this the next step is to start working with advanced scripts in the PYNQ Jupyter notebook. using the same approach as above we can redefine scripts which can be used for different processing including

script = """

import sensor, image, time

sensor.reset() # Initialize the camera sensor.

sensor.set_pixformat(sensor.GRAYSCALE) # or sensor.RGB565

sensor.set_framesize(sensor.QQVGA) # or sensor.QVGA (or others)

sensor.skip_frames(time = 2000) # Let new settings take affect.

sensor.set_gainceiling(8)

clock = time.clock() # Tracks FPS.

while(True):

   clock.tick() # Track elapsed milliseconds between snapshots().

   img = sensor.snapshot() # Take a picture and return the image.

   # Use Canny edge detector

   img.find_edges(image.EDGE_CANNY, threshold=(50, 80))

   # Faster simpler edge detection

   #img.find_edges(image.EDGE_SIMPLE, threshold=(100, 255))

   print(clock.fps()) # Note: Your OpenMV Cam runs about half as fast while

"""

For Canny edge detection when imaging a MiniZed Board

 

Alternatively we can also extract key points from images for tracking in subsequent images.

script = """

import sensor, time, image

# Reset sensor

sensor.reset()

# Sensor settings

sensor.set_contrast(3)

sensor.set_gainceiling(16)

sensor.set_framesize(sensor.VGA)

sensor.set_windowing((320, 240))

sensor.set_pixformat(sensor.GRAYSCALE)

sensor.skip_frames(time = 2000)

sensor.set_auto_gain(False, value=100)

def draw_keypoints(img, kpts):

   if kpts:

       print(kpts)

       img.draw_keypoints(kpts)

       img = sensor.snapshot()

       time.sleep(1000)

kpts1 = None

# NOTE: uncomment to load a keypoints descriptor from file

#kpts1 = image.load_descriptor("/desc.orb")

#img = sensor.snapshot()

#draw_keypoints(img, kpts1)

clock = time.clock()

while (True):

   clock.tick()

   img = sensor.snapshot()

   if (kpts1 == None):

       # NOTE: By default find_keypoints returns multi-scale keypoints extracted from an image pyramid.

       kpts1 = img.find_keypoints(max_keypoints=150, threshold=10, scale_factor=1.2)

       draw_keypoints(img, kpts1)

   else:

       # NOTE: When extracting keypoints to match the first descriptor, we use normalized=True to extract

       # keypoints from the first scale only, which will match one of the scales in the first descriptor.

       kpts2 = img.find_keypoints(max_keypoints=150, threshold=10, normalized=True)

       if (kpts2):

           match = image.match_descriptor(kpts1, kpts2, threshold=85)

           if (match.count()>10):

               # If we have at least n "good matches"

               # Draw bounding rectangle and cross.

               img.draw_rectangle(match.rect())

               img.draw_cross(match.cx(), match.cy(), size=10)

           print(kpts2, "matched:%d dt:%d"%(match.count(), match.theta()))

           # NOTE: uncomment if you want to draw the keypoints

           #img.draw_keypoints(kpts2, size=KEYPOINTS_SIZE, matched=True)

   # Draw FPS

   img.draw_string(0, 0, "FPS:%.2f"%(clock.fps()))

"""

Circle Detection

 

import sensor, image, time

sensor.reset()

sensor.set_pixformat(sensor.RGB565) # grayscale is faster

sensor.set_framesize(sensor.QQVGA)

sensor.skip_frames(time = 2000)

clock = time.clock()

while(True):

   clock.tick()

   img = sensor.snapshot().lens_corr(1.8)

   # Circle objects have four values: x, y, r (radius), and magnitude. The

   # magnitude is the strength of the detection of the circle. Higher is

   # better...

   # `threshold` controls how many circles are found. Increase its value

   # to decrease the number of circles detected...

   # `x_margin`, `y_margin`, and `r_margin` control the merging of similar

   # circles in the x, y, and r (radius) directions.

   # r_min, r_max, and r_step control what radiuses of circles are tested.

   # Shrinking the number of tested circle radiuses yields a big performance boost.

   for c in img.find_circles(threshold = 2000, x_margin = 10, y_margin = 10, r_margin = 10,

           r_min = 2, r_max = 100, r_step = 2):

       img.draw_circle(c.x(), c.y(), c.r(), color = (255, 0, 0))

       print(c)

   print("FPS %f" % clock.fps())

 

 

 

This fusion of ability to offload processing to either the OpenMV camera or the Ultra96 programmable logic running Pynq provides the system designer with maximum flexibility.

 

Wrap Up

The ability to use the OpenMV camera, coupled with the PYNQ computer vision libraries along with other overlays such as the klaman filter and base overlays. We can implement algorithms which can be used to enable us to implement vision guided robotics. Using the base overlay and the Input Output processors also enables us to communicate with lower level drives, interfaces and other sensors required to implement such a solution.

Originaly posted here.

 

Read more…

Arm DevSummit 2020 debuted this week (October 6 – 8) as an online virtual conference focused on engineers and providing them with insights into the Arm ecosystem. The summit lasted three days over which Arm painted an interesting technology story about the current and future state of computing and where developers fit within that story. I’ve been attending Arm Techcon for more than half a decade now (which has become Arm DevSummit) and as I perused content, there were several take-a-ways I noticed for developers working on microcontroller based embedded systems. In this post, we will examine these key take-a-ways and I’ll point you to some of the sessions that I also think may pique your interest.

(For those of you that aren’t yet aware, you can register up until October 21st (for free) and still watch the conferences materials up until November 28th . Click here to register)

Take-A-Way #1 – Expect Big Things from NVIDIAs Acquisition of Arm

As many readers probably already know, NVIDIA is in the process of acquiring Arm. This acquisition has the potential to be one of the focal points that I think will lead to a technological revolution in computing technologies, particularly around artificial intelligence but that will also impact nearly every embedded system at the edge and beyond. While many of us have probably wondered what plans NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang may have for Arm, the Keynotes for October 6th include a fireside chat between Jensen Huang and Arm CEO Simon Segars. Listening to this conversation is well worth the time and will help give developers some insights into the future but also assurances that the Arm business model will not be dramatically upended.

Take-A-Way #2 – Machine Learning for MCU’s is Accelerating

It is sometimes difficult at a conference to get a feel for what is real and what is a little more smoke and mirrors. Sometimes, announcements are real, but they just take several years to filter their way into the market and affect how developers build systems. Machine learning is one of those technologies that I find there is a lot of interest around but that developers also aren’t quite sure what to do with yet, at least in the microcontroller space. When we hear machine learning, we think artificial intelligence, big datasets and more processing power than will fit on an MCU.

There were several interesting talks at DevSummit around machine learning such as:

Some of these were foundational, providing embedded developers with the fundamentals to get started while others provided hands-on explorations of machine learning with development boards. The take-a-way that I gather here is that the effort to bring machine learning capabilities to microcontrollers so that they can be leveraged in industry use cases is accelerating. Lots of effort is being placed in ML algorithms, tools, frameworks and even the hardware. There were several talks that mentioned Arm’s Cortex-M55 architecture that will include Helium technology to help accelerate machine learning and DSP processing capabilities.

Take-A-Way #3 – The Constant Need for Reinvention

In my last take-a-way, I eluded to the fact that things are accelerating. Acceleration is not just happening though in the technologies that we use to build systems. The very application domain that we can apply these technology domains to is dramatically expanding. Not only can we start to deploy security and ML technologies at the edge but in domains such as space and medical systems. There were several interesting talks about how technologies are being used around the world to solve interesting and unique problems such as protecting vulnerable ecosystems, mapping the sea floor, fighting against diseases and so much more.

By carefully watching and listening, you’ll notice that many speakers have been involved in many different types of products over their careers and that they are constantly having to reinvent their skill sets, capabilities and even their interests! This is what makes working in embedded systems so interesting! It is constantly changing and evolving and as engineers we don’t get to sit idly behind a desk. Just as Arm, NVIDIA and many of the other ecosystem partners and speakers show us, technology is rapidly changing but so are the problem domains that we can apply these technologies to.

Take-A-Way #4 – Mbed and Keil are Evolving

There are also interesting changes coming to the Arm toolchains and tools like Mbed and Keil MDK. In Reinhard Keil’s talk, “Introduction to an Open Approach for Low-Power IoT Development“, developers got an insight into the changes that are coming to Mbed and Keil with the core focus being on IoT development. The talk focused on the endpoint and discussed how Mbed and Keil MDK are being moved to an online platform designed to help developers move through the product development faster from prototyping to production. The Keil Studio Online is currently in early access and will be released early next year.

(If you are interested in endpoints and AI, you might also want to check-out this article on “How Do We Accelerate Endpoint AI Innovation? Put Developers First“)

Conclusions

Arm DevSummit had a lot to offer developers this year and without the need to travel to California to participate. (Although I greatly missed catching up with friends and colleagues in person). If you haven’t already, I would recommend checking out the DevSummit and watching a few of the talks I mentioned. There certainly were a lot more talks and I’m still in the process of sifting through everything. Hopefully there will be a few sessions that will inspire you and give you a feel for where the industry is headed and how you will need to pivot your own skills in the coming years.

Originaly posted here

Read more…

by Singapore University of Technology and Design

Internet-of-Things (IoT) such as smart home locks and medical devices, depend largely on Bluetooth low energy (BLE) technology to function and connect across other devices with reduced energy consumption. As these devices get more prevalent with increasing levels of connectivity, the need for strengthened security in IoT has also become vital.

A research team, led by Assistant Professor Sudipta Chattopadhyay from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), wit team members from SUTD and the Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R), designed and implemented the Greyhound framework, a tool used to discover SweynTooth—a critical set of 11 cyber vulnerabilities.

Their study was presented at the USENIX Annual Technical Conference (USENIX ATC) on 15 to 17 July 2020 and they have been invited to present at the upcoming Singapore International Cyber Week (SICW) in October 2020.

These security lapses were found to affect devices by causing them to crash, reboot or bypass security features. At least 12 BLE based devices from eight vendors were affected, including a few hundred types of IoT products including pacemakers, wearable fitness trackers and home security locks.

The SweynTooth code has since been made available to the public and several IoT product manufacturers have used it to find security issues in their products. In Singapore alone, 32 medical devices reported to be affected by SweynTooth and 90% of these device manufacturers have since implemented preventive measures against this set of cyber vulnerabilities.

Regulatory agencies including the Cyber Security Agency and the Health Sciences Authority in Singapore as well as the Department of Homeland Security and the Food and Drug Administration in the United States have reached out to the research team to further understand the impact of these vulnerabilities.

These agencies have also raised public alerts to inform medical device manufacturers, healthcare institutions and end users on the potential security breach and disruptions. The research team continues to keep them updated on their research findings and assessments.

Beyond Bluetooth technology, the research team designed the Greyhound framework using a modular approach so that it could easily be adapted for new wireless protocols. This allowed the team to test it across the diverse set of protocols that IoTs frequently employ. This automated framework also paves new avenues in the testing security of more complex protocols and IoTs in next-generation wireless protocol implementations such as 5G and NarrowBand-IoT which require rigorous and systematic security testing.

"As we are transitioning towards a smart nation, more of such vulnerabilities could appear in the future. We need to start rethinking the device manufacturing design process so that there is limited reliance on communication modules such as Bluetooth to ensure a better and more secure smart nation by design," explained principal investigator Assistant Professor Sudipta from SUTD.

Originally posted HERE.

Read more…

When you’re in technology, you have to expect change. Yet, there’s something to the phrase “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” For instance, I see in the industrial internet of things (IIoT) a realm that’ll dramatically shape the future - how we manufacture, the way we run our factories, workforce needs – but the underlying business goals are the same as always.

Simply put, while industrial enterprise initiatives may change, financial objectives don’t – and they’re still what matter most. That’s why IIoT is so appealing. While the possibilities of smart and connected operations, sites and products certainly appeal to the dreamer and innovator, the clear payoff ensures that it’s a road even the most pragmatic decision-maker will eagerly follow.

The big three
When it comes to industrial enterprises, IIoT addresses the “big three” financial objectives head on. The technology maximizes revenue growth, reduces operating expense and increases asset efficiency.

IIoT does this in numerous ways. It yields invaluable operational intelligence, like real-time performance management data, to reduce manufacturing costs, increase flexibility and enable agility. When it comes to productivity, connected digital assets can empower a workforce with actionable insights to improve productivity and quality, even prevent safety and compliance issues.

For example, recognizing defects in a product early on can save time, materials, staff hours and possibly even a company’s reputation.

Whether on or off the factory floor, IIoT can be used to optimize asset efficiency. With real-time monitoring, diagnostics and analytics, downtime can be reduced or avoided. Asset utilization can also be evaluated and maximized. Think applications like equipment health monitoring, predictive maintenance, the ability to provide augmented 3D instructions for complex repairs. And, you can also scale production more precisely via better control over processes and inventory.

All of this accelerates time to market; another key benefit of IIoT and long held business goal.

Why is 5G important for IIoT and augmented reality (AR)?
As we look at the growing need to connect more devices, more sensors and install things like real-time cameras for doing analytics, there is growing stress and strain that is brought into industrial settings. We have seen the need to increase connectivity while having greater scalability, performance, accessibility, reliability, and broader reach with a lower cost of ownership become much more important. This is where 5G can make a real difference.

Many of our customers have seen what we are doing with augmented reality and the way that PTC can help operators service equipment. But in the not so distant future, the way that people interact with robotics, for example, will change. There will be real-time video to do spatial analytics on the way that people are working with man and machines and we’ll be able to unlock a new level of intelligence with a new layer of connectivity that helps drive better business outcomes.

Partner up
It sounds nice but the truth is, a lot of heavy lifting is required to do IIoT right. The last thing you want to do is venture into a pilot, run into problems, and leave the C-suite less than enthused with the outcome. And make no mistake, there’s a lot potential pitfalls to be aware of.

For instance, lengthy proof of concept periods, cumbersome processes and integrations can slow time to market. Multiple, local integrations can be required when connectivity and device management gets siloed. If not done right, you may only gain limited visibility into devices and the experience will fall short. And, naturally, global initiatives can be hindered by high roaming costs and deployment obstacles.

That said, you want to harness best of breed providers, not only to realize the full benefits of Industry 4.0, but to set yourself up with a foundation that’ll be able to harness 5G developments. You need a trusted IoT partner, and because of the sophistication and complexity, it takes an ecosystem of proven innovators working collaboratively.

That’s why PTC and Ericsson are partners.

Doing what’s best
Ericsson unlocks the full value of global cellular IoT connectivity and provides on-premise solutions. PTC offers an industrial IoT platform that’s ready to configure and deploy, with flexible connectivity and capabilities to build solutions without manual coding.

Drilling down a bit further, Ericsson’s IoT Accelerator can connect and manage billions of devices and millions of applications easily, seamlessly and globally. PTC’s IoT solutions digitalize processes and products, combining the physical and digital worlds seamlessly.

And with wireless connectivity, we can deploy a lot of new technology – from augmented reality to artificial intelligence applications – without having to think about the time and cost of creating fixed infrastructures, running wires, adding network capacity and more.

According ABI Research, organizations that embrace Industry 4.0 and private cellular have the potential to improve gross margins by 5-13% in factory and warehouse operations. Manufacturers can expect a 10x return on their investment. And with 4.3 billion wireless connections in smart factories anticipated by 2030, it’s clear where things are headed.

By focusing on what we each do best, PTC and Ericsson is able to do what’s best for our customers. We can help them build and scale global cellular IoT deployments faster and gain a competitive advantage. They can reap the advantages of Industry 4.0 and create that path to 5G, future-proofing their operations and enjoying such differentiators as network slicing, edge computing and high-reliability, low latency communications.

Further, with our histories of innovation, customers are assured they’ll be supported in the future, remaining out front with the ability to adapt to change, grow and deliver on financial objections.

Editor's Note: This post was originally published by Steve Dertien, Chief Technology Officer for PTC, on Ericsson's website, and is part of a joint content effort with Kiva Allgood, head of IoT for Ericsson. To view Steve's original, please click here. To read Kiva's complementary post, please click here.

Read more…

A scientist from Russia has developed a new neural network architecture and tested its learning ability on the recognition of handwritten digits. The intelligence of the network was amplified by chaos, and the classification accuracy reached 96.3%. The network can be used in microcontrollers with a small amount of RAM and embedded in such household items as shoes or refrigerators, making them 'smart.' The study was published in Electronics.

Today, the search for new neural networks that can operate on microcontrollers with a small amount of random access memory (RAM) is of particular importance. For comparison, in ordinary modern computers, random access memory is calculated in gigabytes. Although microcontrollers possess significantly less processing power than laptops and smartphones, they are smaller and can be interfaced with household items. Smart doors, refrigerators, shoes, glasses, kettles and coffee makers create the foundation for so-called ambient intelligece. The term denotes an environment of interconnected smart devices. 

An example of ambient intelligence is a smart home. The devices with limited memory are not able to store a large number of keys for secure data transfer and arrays of neural network settings. It prevents the introduction of artificial intelligence into Internet of Things devices, as they lack the required computing power. However, artificial intelligence would allow smart devices to spend less time on analysis and decision-making, better understand a user and assist them in a friendly manner. Therefore, many new opportunities can arise in the creation of environmental intelligence, for example, in the field of health care.

Andrei Velichko from Petrozavodsk State University, Russia, has created a new neural network architecture that allows efficient use of small volumes of RAM and opens the opportunities for the introduction of low-power devices to the Internet of Things. The network, called LogNNet, is a feed-forward neural network in which the signals are directed exclusively from input to output. Its uses deterministic chaotic filters for the incoming signals. The system randomly mixes the input information, but at the same time extracts valuable data from the information that are invisible initially. A similar mechanism is used by reservoir neural networks. To generate chaos, a simple logistic mapping equation is applied, where the next value is calculated based on the previous one. The equation is commonly used in population biology and as an example of a simple equation for calculating a sequence of chaotic values. In this way, the simple equation stores an infinite set of random numbers calculated by the processor, and the network architecture uses them and consumes less RAM.

7978216495?profile=RESIZE_584x

The scientist tested his neural network on handwritten digit recognition from the MNIST database, which is considered the standard for training neural networks to recognize images. The database contains more than 70,000 handwritten digits. Sixty-thousand of these digits are intended for training the neural network, and another 10,000 for network testing. The more neurons and chaos in the network, the better it recognized images. The maximum accuracy achieved by the network is 96.3%, while the developed architecture uses no more than 29 KB of RAM. In addition, LogNNet demonstrated promising results using very small RAM sizes, in the range of 1-2kB. A miniature controller, Atmega328, can be embedded into a smart door or even a smart insole, has approximately the same amount of memory.

"Thanks to this development, new opportunities for the Internet of Things are opening up, as any device equipped with a low-power miniature controller can be powered with artificial intelligence. In this way, a path is opened for intelligent processing of information on peripheral devices without sending data to cloud services, and it improves the operation of, for example, a smart home. This is an important contribution to the development of IoT technologies, which are actively researched by the scientists of Petrozavodsk State University. In addition, the research outlines an alternative way to investigate the influence of chaos on artificial intelligence," said Andrei Velichko.

Originally posted HERE.

by Russian Science Foundation

Image Credit: Andrei Velichko

 

 

 

 

Read more…

By: Tom Jeltes, Eindhoven University of Technology

The Internet of Things (IoT) consists of billions of sensors and other devices connected to each other via internet, all of which need to be protected against hackers with malicious purposes. A low-cost and energy efficient solution for the security of IoT devices uses the unique characteristics of the built-in memory chips. Ph.D. candidate Lieneke Kusters investigated how to make optimal use of the chip's digital fingerprint to generate a security key.

The higher the number of devices connected to each other via the Internet of Things, the greater the risk that malicious hackers might gain access to important information, or even take over entire systems. Quite apart from all kinds of privacy issues, it's not hard to imagine that that someone who, for example, has control over temperature sensors in a chemical or nuclear plant, could cause serious damage.

 To prevent problems like these from occurring, each IoT device needs to be able, as it were, to show an identity document—"authentication," in professional terms. Normally, speaking, this is done with a kind of password, which is sent in encrypted form to the person who is communicating with the device. The security key needed for that has to be stored in the IoT device one way or another, Lieneke Kusters explains. "But these are often small and cheap devices that aren't supposed to use much energy. To safely store a key in these devices, you need extra hardware with constant power supply. That's not very practical."

Digital fingerprint

There is a different way: namely by deducing the security key from a unique physical characteristic of the memory chip (Static Random-Access Memory, or SRAM) that can be found in practically every IoT device. Depending on the random circumstances during the chip's manufacturing process, the memory locations have a random default value of 0 or 1.

"That binary code which you can read out when activating the chip, constitutes a kind of digital fingerprint of the device," says Kusters, who gained her doctorate at the Information and Communication Theory Laboratory at the TU/e department of Electrical Engineering. This fingerprint is known as a Physical Unclonable Function (PUF). "The Eindhoven-based company Intrinsic ID sells digital security based on SRAM-PUFs. I collaborated with them for my doctoral research, during which I focused on how to generate, in a reliable way, a key from that digital fingerprint that is as long as possible. The longer, the safer."

The major advantage of security keys based on SRAM-PUFs is that the key exists only at the moment when authentication is required. "The device restarts itself to read out the SRAM-PUF and in doing so creates the key, which subsequently gets erased immediately after use. That makes it all but impossible for an attacker to steal the key."

Noise and reliability

But that's not the entire story, because some bits of the SRAM do not always have the same value during activation, Kusters explains. Ten to fifteen percent of the bits turn out not to be determined, which makes the digital fingerprint a bit fuzzy. How do you use that fuzzy fingerprint to make a key of the highest possible complexity that nevertheless still fits into the receiving lock—practically—each time?

"What you want to prevent is that the generated key won't be recognized by the receiving party as a consequence of the 'noise' in the SRAM-PUF," Kusters explains. "It's alright if that happens one in a million times perhaps, preferably less often." The probability of error is smaller with a shorter key, but such a key is also easier to guess for people with bad intentions. "I've searched for the longest reliable key, given a certain amount of noise in the measurement. It helps if you store extra information about the SRAM-PUF, but that must not be of use to a potential attacker. My thesis is an analysis of how you can reach the optimal result in different situations with that extra information."

Originaly posted here.


 
Read more…

7811924256?profile=RESIZE_400x

 

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

This complete guide is a 212-page eBook and is a must read for business leaders, product managers and engineers who want to implement, scale and optimize their business with IoT communications.

Whether you want to attempt initial entry into the IoT-sphere, or expand existing deployments, this book can help with your goals, providing deep understanding into all aspects of IoT.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Read more…

Edge Products Are Now Managed At The Cloud

Now more than ever, there are billions of edge products in the world. But without proper cloud computing, making the most of electronic devices that run on Linux or any other OS would not be possible.

And so, a question most people keep asking is which is the best Software-as-a-service platform that can effectively manage edge devices through cloud computing. Well, while edge device management may not be something, the fact that cloud computing space is not fully exploited means there is a lot to do in the cloud space.

Product remote management is especially necessary for the 21st century and beyond. Because of the increasing number of devices connected to the internet of things (IoT), a reliable SaaS platform should, therefore, help with maintaining software glitches from anywhere in the world. From smart homes, stereo speakers, cars, to personal computers, any product that is connected to the internet needs real-time protection from hacking threats such as unlawful access to business or personal data.

Data being the most vital asset is constantly at risk, especially if individuals using edge products do not connect to trusted, reliable, and secure edge device management platforms.

Bridges the Gap Between Complicated Software And End Users

Cloud computing is the new frontier through which SaaS platforms help manage edge devices in real-time. But something even more noteworthy is the increasing number of complicated software that now run edge devices at homes and in workplaces.

Edge device management, therefore, ensures everything runs smoothly. From fixing bugs, running debugging commands to real-time software patch deployment, cloud management of edge products bridges a gap between end-users and complicated software that is becoming the norm these days.

Even more importantly, going beyond physical firewall barriers is a major necessity in remote management of edge devices. A reliable Software-as-a-Service, therefore, ensures data encryption for edge devices is not only hackproof by also accessed by the right people. Moreover, deployment of secure routers and access tools are especially critical in cloud computing when managing edge devices. And so, developers behind successful SaaS platforms do conduct regular security checks over the cloud, design and implement solutions for edge products.

Reliable IT Infrastructure Is Necessary

Software-as-a-service platforms that manage edge devices focus on having a reliable IT infrastructure and centralized systems through which they can conduct cloud computing. It is all about remotely managing edge devices with the help of an IT infrastructure that eliminates challenges such as connectivity latency.

Originally posted here

Read more…

Embedded Linux or RTOS: For IoT

by Tirichlabs

Embedded Linux utilizes Linux kernel for an embedded device, but it is quite different from the standard Linux OS. Its application to embedded systems is motivated by the availability of device support, file-systems, network connectivity, and UI support. It is a customized version of Linux for embedded systems, consequently having a much smaller size and minimal features and requires less processing power. Based on embedded system requirements, the Linux kernel is modified and optimized. Such embedded Linux can only run device-specific purpose-built applications.

The Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) with minimal code is used for such applications where least and fix processing time is required. RTOS is a time-sharing system based on clock interrupts that implement priority sequences to execute a process. In the event of a high priority, interrupt is generated by the system, the running low priority processes are stopped and the interrupt is served. The real-time operating system requires less operational memory and synchronizes the processes in such a way they can communicate with each other hence resources can be used efficiently without wastage of time.

 

COMPARISON

Size

The major difference between Embedded Linux and RTOS is in their sizes. RTOS running on an AVR requires approximately 4.4 kilobytes of ROM. Embedded Linux, on the other hand, is relatively larger. The kernel can be stripped of which are not required and even with that, the footprint is generally measured in megabytes.

Embedded Linux RAM requirement is in order of few megabytes. In practical applications, it requires more than that because some other tasks run under these Linux kernels. RTOS has much smaller memory requirements than Linux. A very simple setup, running two tasks, a scheduler, a queue for communication and a semaphore on an 8-bit architecture would use in the vicinity of 200 bytes.

Scheduler

The scheduler in an RT-system is important to ensure that tasks complete in a fixed time. Compared to a regular scheduler for a general-purpose system, it is not the main task of the scheduler to ensure ’fair’ distribution of CPU-time. A common technique is simply to let the task with the highest priority run before all tasks with lower priority. It works fine for a soft real-time system but for hard real-time, the system must provide a better guarantee.

RTOS scheduler

RTOS uses the highest priority first scheduler. It means that the task having the highest priority is always running. This is achieved by having a preemptive scheduler that at a tick-interrupt decides if the currently running task is allowed to continue executing or it needs to be switched for another task based on priority. The scheduler uses the priority to schedule the task with the highest priority. Tasks having the same priority are given a “fair” process time. This schedular allows us to achieve soft real-time but it is difficult to achieve hard real-time by not having any kind of deadline-based scheduling.

For this purpose, there are choices of having a preemptive or a cooperative scheduler. In preemptive mode, a task can be preempted unlike in cooperative mode where it’s up to all tasks to give away the CPU “often” enough so higher priority tasks get to run. Typical RTOS real-time kernel achieves scheduler latencies from zero to a few microseconds.

Embedded Linux scheduler

In Embedded Linux, there are more choices to choose the scheduler. The modular of Embedded Linux allows to change different parts of the system. A simple insmod gives the possibility to change the scheduler. There are a couple of schedulers designed for different things.

First of all, it has a basic highest priority first scheduler that uses the priority of a task and schedules it first. Embedded Linux also implements the Earliest deadline first which uses the periodic feature of Embedded Linux. Assuming that the deadline for every task is when it is next to be run again one can implement a fast EDF. In theory, it is optimal since it can schedule tasks to 100% CPU-usages. In practice, it is not the same due to some overheads. As in idle process Embedded Linux runs a usual Linux kernel and when there are no rt-tasks that can run, Linux gets to run. which can lead to starvation of Linux and thus effectively disabling Linux. But the importance of a real-time system is to run the real-time tasks this is not a big problem for the system. Typical latencies in real-time Linux schedular are in the order of tens to hundreds of microseconds.

CPU resource

Embedded Linux requires a significant amount of CPU resources, perhaps >200MIPS, 32bit processor, ideally with an MMU, 4Mb of ROM and 16MB of RAM and boot may take several seconds.

An RTOS, on the other hand, runs in less than 10Kb, on microcontrollers from 8-bit up and boot in milliseconds.

IoT Implementation of OS

Embedded Linux is often preferred for extremely low-power applications, such as sensors, run for months on batteries. The low-power nature often precludes direct IP connectivity which serves as a gateway for Internet connectivity. The gateway communicates the low-power protocol to the sensors and would translate them to IP. Linux may have an existing protocol to fulfill the requirements.

The basic requirement of an IoT device is network connectivity, typically in the form of IP via a web server. An RTOS can offer IP connectivity but have a risk to be buggy unless you examine it. For example, usually, RTOSs do not isolate the IP stack user from the IP stack itself. Network connectivity requires potentially dealing with low speed or congested links which can lead to obscure and hard-to-debug buffer handling issues when the stack is intermingled with other code. On the other hand, an embedded Linux leverages hardware separation and a widely utilized IP stack that probably has been exposed to corner cases.

Security is essential in IoT devices, which are often exposed to open Internet. A system compromise on the Internet interface is prone to intruders and information or control of the device can be hijacked. Developers can leverage native, embedded Linux features—multiuser, SELinux, and containers—to contain and limit the damage.

Linux certainly is a robust and secure OS and the system has matured in an embedded operating system. Yet one of the drawbacks is its Memory footprint when compared to a real-time operating system even though it can be trimmed down by removing tools and system services that are not required in embedded systems, it still is a large software. It simply cannot run on 8 or 16-bit MCUs and requires more onboard RAM for the Linux kernel. For example, ARM Cortex-M architecture based MCUs, which typically have only a few hundred kilobytes of RAM, and Linux cannot run on these chips.

A common engineering solution for networked systems is to use two processors in the device. In this arrangement, an 8 or 16-bit MCU is used for the sensor or actuator, while a 32-bit processor is used for the network interface which runs an RTOS. Sales of 32-bit MCUs have exploded in the last several years, and have become the largest segment of the MCU market.

ORIGINALLY POSTED HERE ON TIRICH LABS

Read more…
RSS
Email me when there are new items in this category –

Upcoming IoT Events

More IoT News

Arcadia makes supporting clean energy easier

Nowadays, it’s easier than ever to power your home with clean energy, and yet, many Americans don’t know how to make the switch. Luckily, you don’t have to install expensive solar panels or switch utility companies…

Continue

Answering your Huawei ban questions

A lot has happened since we uploaded our most recent video about the Huawei ban last month. Another reprieve has been issued, licenses have been granted and the FCC has officially barred Huawei equipment from U.S. networks. Our viewers had some… Continue

IoT Career Opportunities