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IoT Central Digest, November 16, 2016

Very few people predicted the results of last week's U.S. Elections. The surprise, and for many shock, has put the technology industry on notice as President Elect Trump's administration has outlined a different approach for issues surrounding the technology industry, i.e. trade, hiring and Net Neutrality.

I'm not going to make predictions of what happens next in Washington, but I am going to extend an invitation to all our members and friends to send your predictions for what happens in IoT in 2017. For inspiration grab a crystal ball, or review our 50 Predictions for the Internet of Things in 2016. Send your predictions directly to me with a message here. I will compile the best predictions and publish next month. 

In the meantime, please enjoy this edition of IoT Central Digest. Our contributors and guests cover patent law (great read by the way) and provide super useful lists of IoT organizations, standards and protocols. 

If you're interested in being featured, we always welcome your contributions on all things IoT Infrastructure, IoT Application Development, IoT Data and IoT Security, and more. All members can post on IoT Central. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here.

Internet-of-Things Patents: Tough to Enforce?

Guest post by Kenie Ho and Charles Huang

Companies, like IBM, Intel, and Qualcomm, recognize patents as potent business tools because they can use them to keep competitors out of a market or obtain lucrative licensing royalties by allowing the competitors to practice the inventions. In 2015 alone, these companies each applied for and obtained several thousand new U.S. patents, many on IoT-related inventions. Experts estimate that more than 20,000 patents and patent applications covering IoT technologies exist world-wide.

But are IoT patents truly valuable?

IoT Standards / Organizations

The IoT communication protocols

Guest post by James Stansberry

A fascinating article from Philip N. Howard at George Washington University asserts that based on multiple sources, the number of connected devices surpassed the number of people on the planet in 2014. Further, it estimates that by 2020 we will be approaching 50 billion devices on the Internet of Things (IoT). In other words, while humans will continue to connect their devices to the web in greater numbers, a bigger explosion will come from “things” connecting to the web that weren’t before, or which didn’t exist, or which now use their connection as more of a core feature.  The question is, how will these billions of things communicate between the end node, the cloud, and the service provider?

Is it possible to democratize the Internet of Things?

Possibly be the US technology companies the most commonly use the word “democratization” as a marketing and sales argument. Influenced perhaps by the famous quote of President Abraham Lincoln "Democracy is the Government of the people, by the people, for the people”, US Tech companies have been abusing of the term to sell more. I wondering if their intentions are closest to the no less famous Oscar Wilde´s sentence “Democracy means simply the bludgeoning of the people by the people for the people.”

7 things that are getting smarter in IoT era

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