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IoT Central Digest, June 19, 2016

Here is the latest issue of the IoTC Digest. Our community continues to grow and more members are contributing pieces for discussion and knowledge. If you're interested in being featured, we always welcome your contributions on all things IoT Infrastructure, IoT Application Development, IoT Data and IoT Security, and more. All members can post on IoT Central. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here.

Featured Articles

Internet of Things Checklist: 4 IoT Prerequisites

Posted by Marcus Jensen

The application of the internet has moved past the cyber world and is spilling into the physical realm. Internet of things (IoT) is transforming everyday man-made landscape and making it smarter: from health care and home automation to public transportation and factory operations, humans are breaking new ground at a staggering rate.

Security-First Design for IoT Devices

Posted by Bill Graham

The Stuxnet malware was a wake-up call for embedded device security when it became public knowledge in 2010. Its sophistication and purpose made it clear that industrial control systems and the embedded systems used to control and monitor critical infrastructure were at risk. Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) realities mean that more and more devices are being deployed and connected to each other. This connectivity is both the promise of IoT (data gathering, intelligent control, analytics, etc.) and its Achilles’ heel. With ubiquitous connectivity comes security threats - the reason security has received such a high profile in recent discussions of IoT. 

Smarthome Security Concerns: The Question of Privacy

Posted by Nate Vickery

Today, we are building Smart homes. Our home appliances, our home security systems, our ACs, and not to mention our media sources – they are all connected and monitored via our smartphones, tablets and smartwatches. But when all of our technical devices, our homes, and finally our lives become completely automated – how are we going to maintain a safe environment? How are we going to protect our privacy? And what is the real price of conform? Let’s examine some of the Smarthome security concerns that you should be aware of, if you value your privacy.

Sensory Overload: Digesting Data From The IoT

Posted by Amy Krishnamohan

Have heard about the magic pill? Not sure how it works, but it helps you lose 20 pounds in a week while consuming the same calories as before. And you’ve probably also heard about the scary side effects of that pill. The need for magic pills is appearing in the IoT market as well. Thanks to the explosion of sensors to measure everything imaginable within the Internet of Things, enterprises are confronted with a never-ending buffet of tempting data.

The Top 50 IoT People to Follow on Twitter

Posted by David Oro 

I recently shared the Top 10 Books to Read Now on IoT. In an attempt to keep everyone smarter and share resources in the most simple way, I created the ever ubiquitous listicle by compiling what I believe are the Top 50 IoT people to follow on Twitter. These are, as far as I can tell, real people and not brands. 

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Machine to Machine (M2M) and Internet of Things (IoT) realities mean that more and more devices are being deployed and connected to each other. This connectivity is both the promise of IoT (data gathering, intelligent control, analytics, etc.) and its Achilles’ heel. With ubiquitous connectivity comes security threats -- the reason security has received such a high profile in recent discussions of IoT.
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Original article is published at Forbes: link

Have heard about the magic pill? Not sure how it works, but it helps you lose 20 pounds in a week while consuming the same calories as before. And you’ve probably also heard about the scary side effects of that pill. The need for magic pills is appearing in the IoT market as well. Thanks to the explosion of sensors to measure everything imaginable within the Internet of Things, enterprises are confronted with a never-ending buffet of tempting data.

Typically data has been consumed like food: first it is grown, harvested, and prepared. Then this enjoyable meal is ingested into a data warehouse and digested through analytics. Finally we extract the nutritional value and put it to work to improve some part of our operations. Enterprises have evolved to consume data from CRM, ERP, and even the Web that is high in signal nutrition in this genteel, managed manner from which they can project trends or derive useful BI.

sensory

The IoT and its superabundance of sensors completely changes that paradigm and we need to give serious consideration to our data dietary habits if we want to succeed in this new data food chain. Rather than being served nicely prepared data meals, sensor data is the equivalent of opening your mouth in front of some kind of cartoon food fire hose. Data comes in real-time, completely raw, and in such sustained volume that all you can do is keep stuffing it down.

And, as you would expect, your digestion will be compromised. You won’t benefit from that overload of raw IoT data. In fact, we’ll need to change our internal plumbing, our data pipelines, to get the full nutritional benefit of IoT sensor data.

That will require work, but if you can process the data and extract the value, that’s where the real power comes in.  In fact, you can attain something like superpowers. You can have the eyesight of eagles (self-driving cars), the sonar wave perception of dolphins (for detecting objects in the water), and the night vision of owls (for surveillance cameras).If we can digest all this sensor data and use it in creative ways, the potential is enormous. But how can we adapt to handle this sort of data? Doing so demands a new infrastructure with massive storage, real-time ingestion, and multi-genre analytics.

If we can digest all this sensor data and use it in creative ways, the potential is enormous. But how can we adapt to handle this sort of data? Doing so demands a new infrastructure with massive storage, real-time ingestion, and multi-genre analytics.

Massive storage. More than five years ago, Stephen Brobst predicted that the volume of sensor data would soon crush the amount of unstructured data generated by social media(remember when that seemed like a lot?). Sensor data demands extreme scalability.

Real-time ingestion. The infrastructure needs to be able to ingest raw data and determine moment by moment where to land it. Some data demands immediate reaction and should move into memory. Other data is needed in the data warehouse for operational reporting and analytics. Still other data will add benefit as part of a greater aggregation using Hadoop. Instant decisions will help parse where cloud resources are appropriate versus other assets.

Multi-genre analytics. When you have data that you’ve never seen before, you need to transform data and apply different types of algorithms. Some may require advanced analytics and some may just require a standard deviation. Multi-genre analytics allows you to apply multiple analytics models in various forms so that you can quickly discern the value of the data.

The self-driving car is a helpful metaphor. I’ve heard estimates that each vehicle has 60,000 sensors generating terabytes of data per hour. Consider the variety of that data. Data for obstacle detection requires millisecond response and must be recognized as such if it is to be useful. A sensor on the battery to predict replacement requires aggregation to predict a trend over time and does not require real-time responsiveness. Nevertheless both types of data are being created constantly and must be directed appropriately based on the use case.

How does this work at scale? Consider video games. Real-time data is critical to everything from in game advertising, which depends on near instant delivery of the right ad at a contextually appropriate moment, to recommendations and game features that are critical to the user experience and which are highly specific to moments within the game. At the same time, analyzing patterns at scale is critical to understanding and controlling churn and appeal. This is a lot of data to parse on the fly in order to operate effectively.

From a data perspective, we’re going to need a new digestive system if we are to make the most of the data coming in from the IoT. We’ll need vision and creativity as well. It’s an exciting time to be in analytics.

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Wearable technology is a type of device that is worn by a user and often includes tracking information related to their health and fitness which it can then upload to the cloud. Other wearable tech includes devices that have motion sensors and cameras to take photos and sync with your mobile devices. Wearable devices can be quite useful, but they may present a huge danger to your privacy.

So far, the market has consisted mainly of early adopter businesses assessing the technology. This large group includes Tesco, which gave armbands to workers at a distribution center in Ireland to track products, allocate jobs and measure movement within the complex, with the goal of improving efficiency and accuracy. And health insurer 'Pru Health' offers a 'Fitbug' health and fitness device to their members as a part of it's 'Vitality' program.

It seems inevitable that in the next few years more businesses will begin to explore the potential commercial uses of wearable devices or even begin offering them to their employees, business partners or consumers. In addition, the next few years will no doubt see many employees bringing their own wearable technology into the workplace, for many reasons, such as health benefits and improving productivity.

A key danger for the wearable device market is that a large amount of personal data could be collected from most of these devices. Health and fitness devices could capture extremely sensitive details about a user’s health, and then send it automatically to the cloud for processing by the vendor, who then share it with third parties for 'big data' profiling and targeted advertising.

The 'big data' example really highlights the lack of current regulation for wearable devices and gadgets. Although the analytics and profiling might benefit some of those involved, including in some cases the user, it will become difficult for consumers to keep track of how much of their private data is shared by corporations, and where it's stored. And while many users may be ready to trade their data and lose control over it in exchange for some perceived benefits. Cloud Security is another major concern, and if breached, much of your personal data could be stolen or released.

Your data's security is a very important issue. Cloud Security has been breached numerous times in the past, and If exploited, wearable devices can expose a large amount of very intimate and extensive personal data about a user, including their health, current location, and their behavior. This of course already happens with smartphones, tablets and laptops, but the scale and intrusiveness of data breaches involving wearable devices could be unprecedented.

In the long term, there are data protection reforms in the works, which in their current state include the very controversial 'right to be forgotten' and the right not to be 'profiled' without their consent. If correctly implemented, these reforms could, give users of wearable devices the right to have all their personal data deleted, and could require suppliers in the industry to ask for consent before sending their personal data to be analyzed or for predictions about their work performance, current health, location, behavior or personal preferences. Consent would need to be very specific and actively communicated to the user, so sweeping consents or burying important terms in the fine print may not be enough.

The changes are, however, still being heavily debated, with the goal of being finalized soon. In any case, they could possibly result in ongoing compliance costs for corporations in the wearable device industry.

Ultimately, as is often the case with emerging technologies, it falls to the industry to grapple with these compliance issues. Until the law catches up, device manufacturers, tech vendors and businesses that use or allow employees to use wearables need to address the legal challenges in order to exploit this new technology in a lawful way whilst realizing the potential benefits of wearable technology in business.

Originally posted on Data Science Central

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IoT Central Bi-Weekly Digest, May 20, 2016

We went to IoT World last week in Santa Clara, California, where over 150 vendors and 10,000 attendees were showing their wares and making connections. More posts on that soon. In the meantime, here's our third issue of the IoTC Bi-Weekly Digest. If you're interested in being featured, we always welcome your contributions on all things IoT Infrastructure, IoT Application Development, IoT Data and IoT Security, and more. All members can post on IoT Central. Consider contributing today. Our guidelines are here.

Featured Articles


Who's Your Buddy? An interview with Dave McLauchlan, CEO & Co-Founder, Buddy Platform

By David Oro

Last week at IoT World, I stopped by the Buddy Platform booth (namely because of their killer Lego set-up). Buddy provides data hosting and management solutions for manufacturers and vendors of connected ("IoT") devices. Prior to IoT World, I sent Buddy CEO and Co-Founder Dave McLauchlan a few questions. Here's what he had to say.

People talk about the Internet of Things (IoT) but few know what it even means in practice

By Danielle Storey 

The technology sector is buzzing with predictions and hype about the Internet of Things (IoT), but many people are still confused about what it means, what the real world opportunities are and why businesses should be looking into IoT.

These Are The Weakest Points in Your IoT Security

By Shayla Price

The Internet of Things is changing the world, heralded as one of the most pivotal technology trends of the modern era. We are getting ready to enter a time where everything, quite literally, is connected to the Internet. For the industrial sector, this is a new area of exploration. Factories have smart infrastructures that use sensors to relay data about machine performance. Cities have smart grids that monitor everything from traffic to the energy used by streetlights. Hospitals can monitor the health of high-risk, at-home patients.

In other words, we are entering a hacker's dream world.

The Internet of Things >> Birth of a tech ecosystem purpose-built for disruptive growth

By Roger Attick

The Internet of Things (IoT) concept promises to improve our lives by embedding billions of cheap purpose-built sensors into devices, objects and structures that surround us (appliances, homes, clothing, wearables, vehicles, buildings, healthcare tech, industrial equipment, manufacturing, etc.). What this means is that billions of sensors, machines and smart devices will simultaneously collect volumes of big data, while processing real-time fast data from almost everything and...almost everyone!!! IoT vision is not net reality  Simply stated, the Internet of Things is all about the power of of connections.

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Last week at IoT World, I stopped by the Buddy Platform booth (namely because of their killer Lego set-up). 

Buddy provides data hosting and management solutions for manufacturers and vendors of connected ("IoT") devices. With only a handful of lines of code added to any connected device, Buddy claims that they can host the telemetry data generated by these devices in various regions around the world, as well shape and query the data prior to pushing it into any business intelligence (BI) toolset desired. In addition to telemetry management, Buddy enables M2M scenarios by exposing query results on the telemetry stream via real-time RESTful APIs, as well as a messaging mechanism for external control of devices. 

Prior to IoT World, I sent Buddy CEO and Co-Founder Dave McLauchlan a few questions. Here's what he had to say. 

What is the Buddy Platform?

Buddy Platform is a highly secure, cloud-based platform that takes and processes raw data from hundreds of millions of connected devices, appliances and sensors, then makes it accessible in real-time for businesses. The platform has significant capabilities to manage billions of transactions across millions of devices in real time and at a global scale. 

Buddy’s enterprise-ready solution allows organizations to own the data without investing in data infrastructure. In many cases the companies that make devices with the most potential in their device data are not traditional data companies - they make appliances, vehicles, heavy equipment in farming, mining and manufacturing. These organizations are able to speed up their time to market and skip building out an internal data infrastructure team that can be expensive and resource heavy.

In preparation for massive IoT growth in the next decade, Buddy is focused on how internet connected devices can provide enormous amounts of valuable data to improve and enhance insights and actions across industries. From mining, manufacturing, energy and resources to connected cities, our technology can help businesses improve performance, safety, and functionality across operations. 

We are based in Seattle, WA and have an engineering office in Adelaide, South Australia. In December 2015 we listed on the Australian Securities Exchange under the ticker symbol BUD.

Tell us how mobile is the gateway and hub for IoT.

There is a very strong correlation in the consumer IoT space between mobile applications and IoT devices because mobile apps are the control point. You could say an IoT platform isn’t complete without good, strong mobile support. This approach is a main differentiator for Buddy, our system is a platform for Things and Apps, you can see data from both come through your Buddy account and have a more unified view. Given our heritage as a Mobile as a Backend service, and our capabilities now in IoT we are uniquely positioned against others in the space. 

What trends are you seeing in the silicon industry to address IoT?

More and more silicon organizations, companies and manufacturers are looking to get deeper integration with device management through data management, so that when they sell silicon, the data can be deployed and managed for the customer. Increasingly, customers of silicon vendors are looking for solutions that include a robust, scalable and secure cloud platform. We think this trend will continue, and that has already led to great partnerships between Buddy and companies like Marvell and Gimbal. 

Much of the attention in IoT is focused on consumer technologies, but the real action, often unrealized by the average person, is happening in the industrial sector. What are you most excited about in IoT and what can we expect from it? 

IoT is still managing it’s way through an enormous hype cycle and it’s true, things like wearables and home automation garner much of the attention. While these areas are certainly very exciting because they are the most tangible to people, what’s happening in industrial IOT is just as exciting in that it will also be powering great new experiences and services, but as an enabler rather than being front and center on store shelves. We are seeing great opportunity in the energy sector for IoT, and how that translates into business value for utilities, cities and buildings. Everything from solar panels, to automated meters are becoming connected which means governments, real estate managers and homeowners have a better view into how they are using and producing energy. That translates into cost savings, efficiency and increased awareness that can have real impact in the lives of people, and the health of our environment and planet. 

Photo courtesy of David Oro

 

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The technology sector is buzzing with predictions and hype about the Internet of Things (IoT), but many people are still confused about what it means, what the real world opportunities are and why businesses should be looking into IoT.

At a fundamental and simplistic level the Internet of Things refers to 'physical objects which linked via wired or wireless networks'

These physical objects could be anything (such as medical machines, vehicles, building systems, signage, toasters, smoke alarms, temperature sensors, weather monitors, intelligent tags or rubbish bins for example). Almost any object, in any sector, in any location could potentially join the Internet of Things, so its no wonder that Gartner predict there will be 50 billion devices connected by 2020 (and other analysts estimate several orders of magnitude more).  

Typically the Internet of Things is used to gather data and insight, find efficiency, automate tasks or improve an experience or service. At Smarter Technology Solutions (STS) we put this down to a simple formula, with greater insight, comes better decisions.

I know what you're thinking, why would you connect an object like a rubbish bin to the Internet?

Well its a simple example but it has tremendous flow on effects. Simply tracking the fill level of a rubbish bin using a smart sensor, councils and waste providers can find out a few important facts such as fill-level trends, how often the bin really needs emptying and when, to better plan waste collection services (eg timing of bin collection near food outlets to avoid lunchtimes) and to identify areas that may need more/less bins (to assist with city/service planning).
By collecting just the fill level data of a waste bin the following benefits could be attained:

  1. Reduction in cost as less bin collections = less waste trucks on the road, no unnecessary collections for a bin that's 20% full, less labour to complete waste collection. This also provides a level of operational efficiency and optimized processes.
  2. Environmental benefit - where waste is not overflowing and truck usage is reduced, flow on environmental impact, pollution and fuel consumption is minimized. By ensuring waste bins are placed in convenient locations, littering and scattered waste is also minimized.
  3. Service improvements - truck collection routes can be optimized, waste bins can be collected at convenient times and planning of future/additional services can be amended as the data to trend and verify assumptions is available. 

More complex examples of IoT include:

  • Intelligent transport systems which update digital signage on the highway and adjusts the traffic lights in real time to divert traffic, optimise traffic flow and reduce congestion;
  • A farm which uses sensors to measure soil moisture, chemical levels and weather patterns, adjusting the watering and treatment schedules accordingly;
  • The building which draws the blinds to block out the afternoon sun, reducing the need to consume more power cooling the building and to keep the environment comfortable;
  • Health-care devices which monitor patients and auto-alert medical practitioners once certain symptoms or attributes are detected; 
  • Trucks which automatically detect mechanical anomalies and auto schedule themselves in for preventative maintenance once they reach certain thresholds; 
  • Asset tracking of fleet vehicles within a services company which provides operations staff with fleet visibility to quickly dispatch the closest resource to a job based on proximity to the next task;
  • Water/gas/electric meters which sends in their own reading in on a monthly basis and trends analysis which can detect potential water/gas leaks; or
  • A retail store which analyses your in-store behavior or purchasing patterns and recommend products to you based on previous choices and your personal preferences.

At Smarter Technology Solutions we specialize in consulting with organizations  to understand the benefits of IoT, design best fit solutions, engineer and implement solutions as well as supporting the ongoing support needs of the organization. This results in 3 key outcomes:

  • Discovery of New Opportunities - With better visibility, trends, opportunities, correlations and inefficiencies can be understood. From this, products, services and business models can be adjusted or changed to achieve competitive advantage.
  • Improved Efficiency - By identifying inefficiencies in existing business practices, work-flows can be improved and more automated services can be provided.
  • Improved Services - With trends and real time data businesses are able make smarter decisions and alter the way you services are delivered.

www.smartertechnologysolutions.com.au

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The Internet of Things is changing the world, heralded as one of the most pivotal technology trends of the modern era. We are getting ready to enter a time where everything, quite literally, is connected to the Internet.

For the industrial sector, this is a new area of exploration. Factories have smart infrastructures that use sensors to relay data about machine performance. Cities have smart grids that monitor everything from traffic to the energy used by streetlights. Hospitals can monitor the health of high-risk, at-home patients.

In other words, we are entering a hacker's dream world.

Recent attacks, like the Christmas 2015 attack on the Ukraine power grid, have shown that the Internet of Things possesses severe vulnerabilities. These weak points can be everything from back doors that allow a hacker access to a system to lack of proper use by untrained workers. If your business uses IoT devices, there’s a good chance they are not secure.

Why are so many systems left vulnerable? Weaknesses often come from the same set of five drivers:

Pa1e9cCyWAh6tGKUeQF4-UQgSS_pv-Yr6XRzUL7riY2wtQDkm4jWXT6ryb65N136M3onsWQW2y87NGr2N_Vof6fB1VljWojgrNIgU32gKScfKJceanEpf2x75eX3RaKRsT196PEr 

Source: Allerin

Whether your company is struggling because your devices were deployed too quickly or operational costs constraints got in the way, your team must take measures to fix security risks. Here are four security flaws:

1. Lack of Encryption

Any device that is connected to the Internet to relay data needs encryption. When communication between devices and facility machines are now encrypted, it provides a doorway for hackers to send malicious updates, steal data, and even take control of the system. 

In 2014, an Israeli security firm took control of cars using a specific connected telematics device that failed to use proper encryption.

2. Failing to Install Updates

Once you have a machine-to-machine communication​ system working properly, it can be easy to forget to install the necessary updates to keep the network secure. 

Yet, hackers are constantly updating their strategies and tactics. Failing to install updates and patches leaves your system vulnerable. 

Even if you’re worried about breaking integrations between systems, you should at the least install every security update released by the vendor. These updates are specifically designed to address vulnerabilities discovered in your devices. After all, if your vendor releases a security update, it’s because they found a problem.

You also should know that updates and patches are not always the final solution to security vulnerabilities. Unfortunately, many manufacturers are not able or willing to provide the necessary support to continue updating their devices. 

To avoid this risk, shop carefully for systems that provide updates and are backed by a trusted company.

3. Poorly Built Networks

The modern industrial network is designed to get tasks done. If the design focuses too much on completing that task, it will leave weak points in security. Things that are obvious when building IT networks are sometimes less obvious when creating industrial DNP3 and other network architecture.

The solution to this risk is fairly simple. Those tasked with building industrial networks need to ensure they are partnering with IT professionals to build networks that are safer from attacks. Security features, like deep packet inspection and network segmentation, should be in place from the beginning.

4. Sensors Outside of the Company's Control

Most of the sensors and other connected pieces that make up a network are controlled by the company. But for some companies, that is not the case. For example, power companies have sensors in their customer's homes. 

Sensors outside of the company's immediate control are hard to secure, which gives hackers access. Currently, cloud-based security using public key services to authenticate devices may be the best solution to this problem.

Don't Take The Risk

Industrial security breaches can cause devastating consequences.​ Therefore, the above risks need to be addressed.

As more industrial facilities rely on the Internet of Things, it's important for company teams to be aware of the potential vulnerabilities. Take security into full consideration.

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Just ahead of the Internet of Things World conference taking place May 10–12 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Silicon Valley, we were lucky enough to catch up with one of the conference speakers, Ken Finnegan, Chief Technology Officer, IDA Technology Ireland. He advises and provides strategic insights into technology trends both nationally and globally for the agency and client companies. He has worked in the software, telecommunications and big data industries for 15 years before joining the IDA in 2014. The IDA is Ireland's inward investment promotion agency, it is a non-commercial, semi-state body promoting Foreign Direct Investment into Ireland through a wide range of services.

We asked Mr. Finnegan about IoT and Smart Cities, IoT implementations in Dublin, and his thoughts on making cities smarter.  Here’s what we learned.

 

What are a few examples of IoT-based technologies that have been implemented throughout Dublin?

There are some really great projects happening in Ireland. The approach that Dublin has taken is a balanced top down - bottom up approach. What I mean by this is that the smart initiative is being driven by city leaders with support from government agencies (e.g. IDA Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and Science Foundation Ireland) at the top, whilst at the same time engaging with the citizens and companies in order to identify and seek solutions to the real needs of the city. 

There are five pillars to the Smart Dublin strategy. These include:

  • Smart Government
  • Smart Mobility
  • Smart Environment
  • Smart Living 
  • Smart People

The principles followed: 

  • How to use smart technologies to improve city livability and competitiveness:
  • Taking a challenge based approach to procurement to deliver better quality outcomes for the city.
  • Positioning Dublin as the place to pilot and scale new smart city technology opportunities. 

Understanding the key areas of focus and the driving principles are vital to describing the challenges and demonstrating that top down bottom up approach. 

A recently completed Smart City challenge that is a fantastic demonstration of IoT in the city was “Keeping Our City Streets Clean.“

A critical role of the city council is that of street cleaning and managing waste across busy city center areas in particular. There is a network of over 3,500 street bins that are manually emptied on a regular basis - the timing of which varies depending on the profile of the street. This street cleaning service is critical to maintaining a clean and litter free city. There has been an increasing trend of successful deployment of smart bin technologies in cities that incorporate features such as:

  • Sensors that communicate back to the street cleaners when they are full
  • Use of accompanying software that allow for optimization of routes for cleaning schedules
  • Use of software applications that deliver real-time data information (through a web portal or smartphone) on each bin status, their inventory management and other efficiency related data

The result was self-compacting bins that send an email when they need to be emptied!

Smart Bins are solar-powered, Wi-Fi enabled bins that are being installed in towns, villages and residential areas across the country to replace traditional public litter bins.

There are currently 401 Smart Bins installed in the south county area. The project is managed by the County Council by the Environment Department with the purpose to improve the efficiency of waste management.

Other examples can be found here including this video of Croke Park Smart Stadium.

 

Since transitioning to a smart city, what benefits has the city of Dublin experienced? And what plans do you have to make Dublin even smarter?

Without a doubt the biggest benefit Dublin and Ireland’s other cities have seen is a demonstration of the power of collaboration to uncover value. 

IDA Ireland has been successful in attracting and supporting multinationals here for a long time. With the combination of engagement with our multinational companies, a vibrant small-to-medium enterprise and start-up community, an openness for business from the cities, the youngest, digitally savvy population in Europe, a highly connected research ecosystem that is easily accessed by industry and support from the government - there is a lot happening. 

For example, Dublin has what we call ‘Silicon Docks’. It’s a part of the city that has the European HQ’s for Google, Facebook, Airbnb, Twitter, LinkedIn, LogMeIn, Adroll, Accenture, Zalando, Tripadvisor and more.

Dublin City Corporation are planning to make this part of the city the most ‘densely sensored’ urban area in the world - producing lots of data that will be accessible by companies, government, academia and citizens. We anticipate that this is going to be a very powerful demonstration of Ireland’s capabilities to design and develop the sensors, connect them over multiple transmission types and finally with one of Europe’s largest data analytics research centers here, uncover, discover and predict value. 

Central to the smart city goals is also to ensure that the infrastructure in place, the LORA (Low Powered Radio) transmission standards are currently being rolled out across the entire island. This is funded by Science Foundation Ireland and coordinated by the CONNECT Research center and allows companies to conduct robust due diligence into what transmission standard works for them. Companies can also access and rent the live radio spectrum, access the Sigfox network and lots more infrastructure; the building blocks are in place for technical solutions.

Ireland seems to have a head start when it comes to the innovation in the area of IoT and smart cities. What other cities have you admired in their innovation, implementations and adoption to make their cities smarter?

A city I really respect for embracing and encouraging technology is Amsterdam. 

Amsterdam is my second home, I lived there after graduating university and it was where a young Ken Finnegan learned the power and beauty of innovation. That is a city that is not afraid to positively leverage emergent technologies. I have seen cities, companies, government and people look at innovation as a threat and to try and tame it. This never works, if there is a smarter way to do things, do it. When policy tries to limit adoption of innovation or when companies fail to recognize it, they are only delaying its ubiquitous arrival and ultimately lose opportunities for growth and success. Amsterdam has the right attitude. It may not know what it’s dealing with but they know there is value to be exploited somehow. I would love to see a twining of Amsterdam and Dublin. I think they are two European cities that are extremely likeminded in approach.

Ireland seems to be all in on smart cities - enlisting both the public and private sector, and educational institutions - towards creating smart cities. Whats your advice for other government entities and the many private vendors in this space?

Indeed governments, academia and the private sector all play an essential part and each entity has ideas about what value is and how it will be generated. Simply my advice is to start the conversation.

Government can facilitate conversation with all the entities. We have a strong appetite for change and growth and a characteristic in Ireland I come across every day is the idea of coopetition. The idea of cooperating together whilst possibly in competition. We all wear the green jersey in Ireland, we are very proud of this green island, but we also want to develop the industry ultimately making it stronger for all in order to grow and win. By not talking to each, you limit growth opportunities, when you sit with competitor and others you need to figure out the safe ground and see how you can work together to succeed. 

Next we have to realize that government and industries have to engage with the end-users. We see that the citizen or what I term pro-citizen (professional citizen – the skilled and informed people that live, work and play in the cities, know the fabric of the city – plumbers, binmen, clubber, doctors, civil servants, sports members, teachers, social workers, bar staff, etc.), as the consumers of smart city good and services. These citizens provide the suggested personalized solutions of the problems they encounter in day-to-day life. It’s the application of a User Design approach to Smart cities.

Finally we have being listening to the narrative about the power of big data for years now. In order to harness the power it essential that data is accessible to all. For example Dublinked is a regional data sharing initiative that has previously unreleased public operational data being made available online for others to research or reuse. With the initial data coming from Dublin City (4 boroughs), public and private organizations in Dublin are linking up with Dublinked to share their data and invite research collaborations. The information is curated by Maynooth University to ensure ideas can be commercialized as easily as possible and to minimize legal or technical barriers that can be impediments for small and medium businesses (SMEs) seeking to develop and prove business ideas.

Smart cities are predicated on the advancement of IoT technologies. Do you see IoT as an opportunity for economic development and job creation? If so, how?

Yes for both cases.

In our five-year strategy launched in 2015, Wining 2020, IoT is the number one strategic technological area we are focusing on. If we didn’t believe IoT would increase economic development or create jobs there is absolutely no way it would be there. We have done our homework, we have listened to our clients and we have mobilized the organization to ensure that each person know exactly why Ireland is the global location for the Internet of Things. In addition to this, we are working with other government agencies to ensure that the environment is right for our clients to be successful. For example our sister agency Science Foundation Ireland has funded multiple research centers of scale (€50m +) so that industry can leverage the quality research coming from the academic system. They have also funded the roll out of transmission network s across the entire land that can be leveraged by industry to research, test and develop innovations. Between IDA Ireland, Enterprise Ireland and Science Foundation Ireland, there are many tools we provide by which industry can leverage to test and trail their products and services before commercializing. Our client companies are trailing these, not in a confine test lab, but literally out in the field, in the cities, in our bays and on our highways because Ireland is connected.

Youll be speaking at IoT World. What should the audience expect to hear from you?

Three things:

1. Ireland is open for business. If you have a problem that needs to be solved, if you want to service the European, Middle East and African markets, if you need infrastructure for research and development, or simply looking for a location with accessible and available talent, we are ready for to have that conversation. 

2. IoT has gained a lot of talk time over the past 5 years, but the conversation for IoT have been developing in Ireland more than 30 years. We are home to 10 out of the top 10 born on the internet/content companies, 9 of the top 10 information communication technology, 15 of the top 20 pharmaceutical and life science companies, fintech, engineering, food etc. companies. Many of these companies are developing their IoT solutions by working together here. It’s truly an agile and collaborative hotspot to be. Take a look at the past two years and the companies that have decided to move here, there is a very convincing track record. 

3. The environment is right. With one of the youngest and tech savvy populations in Europe, the biggest names in Industry, proactive government agencies and an academic scene focused on impact for industry, IDA Ireland want to partner and support companies ready to grow and succeed in the Smart IoT arena.

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The observation deck won’t be finished for a few years yet. If you want to see the future of New York, walk north along the High Line, round the curve at the rail yards, and turn your back to the river. Amid the highway ramps and industrial hash of far-west Manhattan, a herd of cranes hoists I-beams into the sky. This is Hudson Yards, the largest private real-estate development in United States history and the test ground for the world’s most ambitious experiment in “smart city” urbanism. 1

Over the next decade, the $20-billion project — spanning seven blocks from 30th to 34th Street, between 10th and 12th Avenues — will add 17 million square feet of commercial, residential, and civic space, much of it housed in signature architecture by the likes of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill; Diller Scofidio + Renfro; and Bjarke Ingels Group. 2But you don’t have to wait that long to see where this is headed. The first office tower, Kohn Pedersen Fox’s 10 Hudson Yards, opens next month, with direct access to the High Line. The new subway stop is already in business (and has already sprung a few leaks); an extension of the 7 train line connects the diverse, middle-class neighborhood of Flushing, Queens, with this emerging island of oligarchs.

Read the complete story here.

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The Internet of Things (IoT) concept promises to improve our lives by embedding billions of cheap purpose-built sensors into devices, objects and structures that surround us (appliances, homes, clothing, wearables, vehicles, buildings, healthcare tech, industrial equipment, manufacturing, etc.).

IoT Market Map -- Goldman Sachs

What this means is that billions of sensors, machines and smart devices will simultaneously collect volumes of big data, while processing real-time fast data from almost everything and... almost everyone!!!

IoT vision is not net reality

Simply stated, the Internet of Things is all about the power of connections.

Consumers, for the moment anyway, seem satisfied to have access to gadgets, trendy devices and apps which they believe will make them more efficient (efficient doesn't necessarily mean productive), improve their lives and promote general well-being.

Corporations on the other hand, have a grand vision that convergence of cloud computing, mobility, low-cost sensors, smart devices, ubiquitous networks and fast-data will help them achieve competitive advantages, market dominance, unyielding brand power and shareholder riches.

Global Enterprises (and big venture capital firms) will spend billions on the race for IoT supremacy. These titans of business are chomping at the bit to develop IoT platforms, machine learning algorithms, AI software applications & advanced predictive analytics. The end-game of these initiatives is to deploy IoT platforms on a large scale for;

  • real-time monitoring, control & tracking (retail, autonomous vehicles, digital health, industrial & manufacturing systems, etc.)
  • assessment of consumers, their emotions & buying sentiment,
  • managing smart systems and operational processes,
  • reducing operating costs & increasing efficiencies,
  • predicting outcomes, and equipment failures, and
  • monetization of consumer & commercial big data, etc.

 

IoT reality is still just a vision

No technology vendor (hardware or software), service provider, consulting firm or self-proclaimed expert can fulfill the IoT vision alone.

Recent history with tech hype-cycles has proven time and again that 'industry experts' are not very accurate predicting the future... in life or in business!

Having said this, it only makes sense that fulfilling the promise of IoT demands close collaboration & communication among many stake-holders.

A tech ecosystem is born

IoT & Industrial IoT comprise a rapidly developing tech ecosystem. Momentum is building quickly and will drive sustainable future demand for;

  • low-cost hardware platforms (sensors, smart devices, etc.),
  • a stable base of suppliers, developers, vendors & distribution,
  • interoperability & security (standards, encryption, API's, etc.),
  • local to global telecom & wireless services,
  • edge to cloud networks & data centers,
  • professional services firms (and self-proclaimed experts),
  • global strategic partnerships,
  • education and STEM initiatives, and
  • broad vertical market development.

I'll close with one final thought; "True IoT leaders and visionaries will first ask why, not how..!"

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Editors Note: Members of IoT Central are encouraged to participate in Ventana Research's study. The author of the blog shares details below.

The emerging Internet of Things (IoT) is an extension of digital connectivity to devices and sensors in homes, businesses, vehicles and potentially almost anywhere. This innovation means that virtually any device can generate and transmit data about its operations – data to which analytics can be applied to facilitate monitoring and a range of automatic functions. To do these tasks IoT requires what Ventana Research calls operational intelligence (OI), a discipline that has evolved from the capture and analysis of instrumentation, networking and machine-to-machine interactions of many types. We define operational intelligence as a set of event-centered information and analytic processes operating across an organization that enable people to use that event information to take effective actions and make optimal decisions. Ventana Research first began covering operational intelligence over a decade ago.

In many industries, organizations can gain competitive advantage if they reduce the elapsed time between an event occurring and actions taken or decisions made in response to it. Existing business intelligence (BI) tools provide useful analysis of and reporting on data drawn from previously recorded transactions, but to improve competitiveness and maximize efficiencies organizations are concluding that employees and processes in IT, business operations and front-line customer sales, service and support also need to be able to detect and respond to events as they happen.

Both business objectives and regulations are driving demand for new operational intelligence technology and practices. By using them many activities can be managed better, among them manufacturing, customer engagement processes, algorithmic trading, dynamic pricing, yield management, risk management, security, fraud detection, surveillance, supply chain and call center optimization, online commerce and gaming. Success in efforts to combat money laundering, terrorism or other criminal behavior also depends on reducing information latency through the application of new techniques.

The evolution of operational intelligence, especially in conjunction with IoT, is encouraging companies to revisit their priorities and spending for information technology and application management. However, sorting out the range of options poses a challenge for both business and IT leaders. Some see potential value in expanding their network infrastructure to support OI. Others are implementing event processing (EP) systems that employ new technology to detect meaningful patterns, anomalies and relationships among events. Increasingly, organizations are using dashboards, visualization and modeling to notify nontechnical people of events and enable them to understand their significance and take appropriate and immediate action.

As with any innovation, using OI for IoT may require substantial changes to organizations. These are among the challenges they face as they consider adopting this evolving operational intelligence:

  • They find it difficult to evaluate the business value of enabling real-time sensing of data and event streams using radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, agents and other systems embedded not only in physical locations like warehouses but also in business processes, networks, mobile devices, data appliances and other technologies.
  • They lack an IT architecture that can support and integrate these systems as the volume, variety and frequency of information increase. In addition, our previous operational intelligence research shows that these data sources are incomplete or inadequate in nearly two out of five organizations.
  • They are uncertain how to set reasonable business and IT expectations, priorities and implementation plans for important technologies that may conflict or overlap. These can include BI, event processing, business process management, rules management, network upgrades, and new or modified applications and databases.
  • They don’t understand how to create a personalized user experience that enables nontechnical employees in different roles to monitor data or event streams, identify significant changes, quickly understand the correlation between events and develop a context adequate to enable determining the right decisions or actions to take.

Today’s fast-paced, 24-by-7 world has forced organizations to reduce the latency between when transactions and other data are recorded and when applications and BI systems are made aware of them and thus can take action. Furthermore, the introduction of low-cost sensors and the instrumentation of devices ranging from appliances and airline engines to crop management and animal feeding systems creates opportunities that have never before existed. Technological developments such as smart utility meters, RFID and embedded computing devices for environmental monitoring, surveillance and other tasks also are creating demand for tools that can provide insights in real time from continuous streams of event data.

As organizations expand business intelligence to serve operational needs by deploying dashboards and other portals, they are recognizing the need to implement technology and develop practices that collect events, correlate them into meaningful patterns and use workflow, rules and analytics to guide how employees and automated processes should react. In financial services, online commerce and other industries, for example, some organizations have built proprietary systems or have gone offshore to employ large teams of technicians at outsourcing providers to monitor transactions and event streams for specific patterns and anomalies. To reduce the cost, complexity and imperfections in these procedures, organizations now are seeking technology that can standardize and automate event processing and notify appropriate personnel of significant events in real time.

Conventional database systems are geared to manage discrete sets of data for standard BI queries, but event streams from sources such as sensing devices typically are continuous, and their analysis requires tools designed to enable users to understand causality, patterns, time relationships and other factors. These requirements have led to innovation in event stream processing, event modeling, visualization and analytics. More recently the advent of open source and Hadoop-related big data technologies such as Flume, Kafka, Spark and Storm are enabling a new foundation for operational intelligence. Innovation in the past few years has occurred in both the open source community and proprietary implementations.

Many of the early adopters of operational intelligence technologies were in financial services and intelligence, online services and security. However, as organizations across a range of other industries seek new competitive advantages from information or require real-time insight for risk management and regulatory compliance, demand is increasing broadly for OI technologies. Organizations are considering how to incorporate event-driven architectures, monitor network activity for significant event patterns and bring event notification and insight to users through both existing and new dashboards and portals.

To help understand how organizations are tackling these changes Ventana Research is conducting benchmark research on The Internet of Things and Operational Intelligence. The research will explore how organizations are aligning themselves to take advantage of trends in operational intelligence and IoT. Such alignment involves not just information and technology, but people andprocesses as well. For instance, IoT can have a major impact on business processes, but only if organizations can realign IT systems to a discover-and-adapt rather than a model-and-apply paradigm. For instance, business processes are often outlined in PDF documents or through business process systems. However, these processes are often carried out in an uneven fashion different from the way the model was conceived. As more process flows are directly instrumented and some processes carried out by machines, the ability to model directly based on the discovery of those event flows and to adapt to them (either through human learning or machine learning) becomes key to successful organizational processes.

By determining how organizations are addressing the challenges of implementing these technologies and aligning them with business priorities, this research will explore a number of key issues, the following among them:

  • What is the nature of the evolving market opportunity? What industries and LOBs are most likely to adopt OI for IoT?
  • What is the current thinking of business and IT management about the potential of improving processes, practices and people resources through implementation of these technologies?
  • How far along are organizations in articulating operational intelligence and IoT objectives and implementing technologies, including event processing?
  • Compared to IT management, what influence do various business functions, including finance and operations management, have on the process of acquiring and deploying these event-centered technologies?
  • What suppliers are organizations evaluating to support operational intelligence and IoT, including for complex event processing, event modeling, visualization, activity monitoring, and workflow, process and rules management?
  • Who are the key decision-makers and influencers within organizations?

Please join us in this research. Fill out the survey to share your organization’s existing and planned investments in the Internet of Things and operational intelligence. Watch this space for a report of the findings when the research is completed.

Regards,

David Menninger

SVP & Research Director

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Guest blog by Ian Skerrett. It originally appeared here.

Today we release the results of our second annual IoT Developer Survey. Like last year it provides an interesting insight into how developers are building IoT solutions.

This year the Eclipse IoT Working Group partnered with IEEE IoT and the AGILE-IoT research project to expand the scope and respondent pool for the survey. Thanks to this partnership, we had 528 participants in the survey, up from 392 last year. The partnership also allowed us to analyze the data to look for any significant difference between the different IoT communities.

As with any surveys of this nature, I encourage readers to see these results as one data point that should be compared with other data and industry trends. These results will have certain biases but I do believe these results identify some interesting trends in the IoT industry.

Key Trends for IoT developers

  1.  Companies are shipping IoT solutions today. 46% of the respondents claim their company develops and deploys an IoT solution today. Another 29% plan to do so in the next 6 months. This is a clear indication the industry is maturing quickly.

iotplans

  1. Security continues to be a key concern. It’s not a big surprise that security continues to be the top concern in IoT. Interoperability is the second key concern. I do believe we are on the way to solving some of the interoperability issues with projects like Eclipse HonoEclipse Smarthome and Eclipse Kura. I also think some of the work the AGILE-IoT project is doing will address these issues. However, it still seems the IoT industry still needs to focus on security. It is a difficult issue that needs to be solved.For companies that have deployed a solution today, performance is rising to the third key concern. It is not clear what the performance issues are, but it is something that warrants more investigation.

concerns

  1. Top IoT programming languages: Java, C, JavaScript, Python.  Not surprising to see these languages as being the most popular for developers. I do find some people question the use of Java in IoT. The Eclipse IoT community has a number of Java projects, so there is some bias in the results toward Java. However, even when removing the respondents from the Eclipse IoT community, the top 3 languages are C, Python and Java.

languages

  1. MQTT and HTTP are the dominant message protocols.Without a doubt MQTT has become a pervasive and widely used protocol for IoT. HTTP being the other protocol.
    The other messaging protocol supported in the Eclipse IoT community is CoAP. It did not receive as much support, but it does appear to have support in certain industries. For instance, the use of CoAP increases if the respondent is in the IoT Platforms or Smart Cities industry. The fact IoT Platforms are supporting CoAP is expected and a good thing. It does seem Smart Cities industry is using CoAP but I am not sure where or how. If anyone has details, please leave a comment.As an aside, the success of MQTT is a testament to IBM’s strategy to standardize MQTT at OASIS and start the Eclipse Paho project. It really is a perfect case study for using open source and open standards to gain broad industry adoption. For example, 1) MQTT is now supported by IBM Bluemix, Amazon AWS IoT, MS Azure IoT, plus every other  IoT middleware platform in the market, 2) the new Arduino board is also using MQTT to communicate with their cloud, and 3) Eclipse Paho and Eclipse Mosquitto are some of the most popular and active projects at Eclipse. MQTT is everywhere. Well done IBM.

protocols

  1. Linux is the dominant IoT operating system. Over 70% of the respondents claimed they use Linux for their IoT operating system. The next more popular section at 23% was No OS/Bare metal. In the last number of years, a number of new IoT operating systems have been introduced (ex. ARM mbed, Contiki, RIOT, Zephyr) but the adoption still hasn’t materialized. It seems many companies are using Yocto to create their own Linux distro for their IoT solution. It will be interesting to watch how these other operating systems grow in comparison to Linux.

os

  1. Amazon leads in IoT cloud services. Not terribly surprising Amazon came out on top as the top cloud service provider. However, Private/On premise was a close second so I think this is an indication that IoT cloud services is still in its infancy. What did surprise me was that Microsoft Azure was number 3 in the survey and does even better when a company has a deployed solution. This seems to reflect MS Azure’s heavy emphasis on IoT use cases.

cloud

  1. Open source is pervasive in IoT. I strongly believe open source is critical to the success of the IoT industry. Therefore, I was encouraged to see 58% of the respondents are actively engaged with open source. I think it is a great statement on the work we have been doing at Eclipse IoT to create an open source community for the IoT industry.

 

Trends between 2015 and 2016

This is the second year we have done this type of survey so I was curious what has changed between 2015 and 2016. Interestingly enough, not a lot has changed. Many of the trends and highlights mentioned above are consistent with the 2015 results. This consistency would appear to confirm that the results are a good reflection of how developers are building IoT solutions.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the survey. We definitely appreciate your input. The complete results are available on slideshareand the raw data in xls and ods format. Feel free to leave a comment or contact me if you have any questions.

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Machine learning is the science of getting computers to act without being explicitly programmed. In the past decade, machine learning has given us self-driving cars, practical speech recognition, effective web search, and a vastly improved understanding of the human genome. It will play a big part in the IoT. From our friends at R2D3 is a very interesting visual introduction to machine learning. Check it out here

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The Next Big Thing In Big Data: BDaaS

Guest blog post by Bernard Marr

We’ve had software as a service, platform as a service and data as a service. Now, by mixing them all together and massively upscaling the amount of data involved, we’ve arrived at Big Data as a Service (BDaaS).

It might not be a term you’re familiar with yet – but it suitably describes a fast-growing new market. In the last few years many businesses have sprung up offering cloud based Big Data services to help other companies and organizations solve their data dilemmas.

Source for illustration: click here

Some estimate that business IT spending on cloud-based, x-as-a-service activity will increase from about 15% today to 35% by 2021. Given that it is estimated that the global Big Data market will be worth $88 billion by that point, we can see that the forecast value of the BDaaS market could be $30 billion.

So, here I will attempt to give a brief(ish) overview of the concept, as well as examples of how it is being put into practice in real life businesses and organizations around the world.

What is BDaaS?

Big Data refers to the ever-growing amount of information we are creating and storing, and the analysis and use of this data. In a business sense, it particularly refers to applying insights gleaned from this analysis in order to drive business growth.

At the moment, BDaaS it is a somewhat nebulous term, which is often used to describe a wide variety of outsourcing of various Big Data functions to the cloud.

This can range from the supply of data, to the supply of analytical tools with which to interrogate the data (often through a web dashboard or control panel) to carrying out the actual analysis and providing reports. Some BDaaS providers also include consulting and advisory services within their BDaaS packages.

So, in many ways, BDaaS encompasses elements of what has become known as software as a service, platform as a service, data as a service, and so on – and applies them to solving Big Data problems.

Why is BDaaS useful?

There are several advantages to outsourcing or virtualizing your analytics activities involving large datasets.

The popularity of Hadoop has to some extent democratized Big Data – anyone can use cheap off-the-shelf hardware and open source software to analyze data, if they invest time learning how. But most commercial Big Data initiatives will still involve money being spent up front on components and infrastructure. When a large company launches a major initiative, this is likely to be substantial.

On top of upfront costs, storing and managing large quantities of information requires an ongoing investment of time and resources. When you use BDaaS, all of the techy “nuts and bolts” are, in theory, out of sight and out of mind, leaving you free to concentrate on business issues.

BDaaS providers generally take this on for the customer – they have everything set up and ready to go – and you simply rent the use of their cloud-based storage and analytics engines and pay either for the time you use them or the amount of data crunched.

Additionally BDaaS providers often take on the cost of compliance and data protection. When the data is stored on their servers, they are (generally) responsible for it.

Who provides and uses BDaaS?

A good example is IBM’s Analytics for Twitter service, which provides businesses with access to data and analytics on Twitter’s 500 million tweets per day and 280 million monthly active users.

As well as the “firehose” of tweets it provides analytics tools and applications for making sense of that messy, unstructured data and has trained 4,000 consultants to help businesses put plans into action to profit from them.

Another is agricultural manufacturers John Deere, which fits all of its tractors with sensors that stream data about the machinery as well as soil and crop conditions to the MyJohnDeere.com and Farmsight services. Farmers can subscribe to access analytical intelligence on everything from when to order spare parts to where to plant crops.

The arrival of Apple’s Watch – perhaps the device that will bring consumer wearables into the mainstream – will doubtlessly bring with it a tsunami of new BDaaS apps. They will soak up the data from the presumed millions of people who will soon be using it for everything from monitoring their heart rate to arranging their social calendar to remote controlling their home entertainment. Then they will find innovative ways to package it and sell it back to us. Apple and IBM have just announced their collaboration on a big data health platform.

In sales and marketing, BDaaS is increasingly playing its part, too. Many companies now offer customer profiling services, including Acxiom – the world’s biggest seller of direct marketing data. By applying analytics to the massive amount of personal data they collect, they can more effectively profile us as consumers and hand their own customers potential leads.

Amazon’s AWS as well as Google’s AdSense and AdWords are better known services that would also fall under the banner. They are all used by thousands of small to medium-sized businesses to host data infrastructure, and target their marketing at relevant niches where potential customers could be lurking.

The future of BDaaS?

The term may be rather unwieldy and inelegant (I’ve written before that I’m not even particularly a fan of the term Big Data, so BDaaS is a further step into the ridiculous) but the concept is rock solid.

As more and more companies realize the worth of implementing Big Data strategies, more services will emerge to support them. Data analysis can and generally does bring positive change to any organization that takes it seriously, and this includes smaller scale operations which won’t have the expertise (or budget to develop that expertise) to do it themselves.

With the growth in popularity of software as a service, we are increasingly used to working in a virtualized environment via a web interface, and integrating analytics into this process is a natural next step. We can already see that it is making Big Data projects viable for many businesses that previously would have considered them out of reach – and I think it is something we will see and hear a lot more about in the near future.

AboutBernard Marr is a globally recognized expert in big data, analytics and enterprise performance. He helps companies improve decision-making and performance using data. His new book is Data: Using Smart Big Data, Analytics and Metrics To Make Better Decisions and Improve PerformanceYou can read a free sample chapter here.

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