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Within the few months of its release, Internet of Things (IoT) has taken everyone by storm in numerous ways. As a result, more and more organizations, industries, and technologists catch the IoT bug. Right from Data streaming to data collection, events, decisions, processes, messaging, and integration, everything is involved in the form of developer’s activities. Now, do you think that IoT is just another opportunity for vendors to sell or update developer tools? Well, according to several resources nearly 40 billion which is approximately 30 devices for each and every active social network user in the world. In addition to this, trillions of sensors will comprise the IoT.

What is Internet of Things?

It is the network of physical objects, whether in terms of devices, vehicles, buildings or even humans, which are embedded with electronics, sensors, and software and network connectivity. And of course, these devices help us to send, transfer and collect important data anywhere and at any point in time. I strongly feel that the technology, in particular, has turned out to be a growing sensation that’s captured everyone in the technology world. And it is assumed that companies, as well as individuals, are investing $6 trillion in IoT devices within the next five years.   

Bringing IoT to Developing Countries

Now you must be thinking that getting IoT technology to developing countries might be a major problem but in the actual scenario, there’s already a standard infrastructure in many countries. I am sure that you must be well aware regarding the fact that 95% of the world has basic 2G phone coverage, and while 29% of those in rural areas have 3G coverage, 89 percent who reside in urban areas are able to access 3G coverage with ease.

In addition to this, IoT is affordable with some saying that the IoT at its basic capability is already in place in developing countries, where citizens and government officials would bear little cost in tweaking it. Last but certainly not the least, IoT devices have a “plug-and-play” attribute to them, that doesn’t require proper setup from skilled laborer. This allows scalability within the devices. After all, technology grows only at the speed the city or the country wants to it.

What kind of Industries is gaining benefit from IoT?

With the increase in technology, more and more software development firms are establishing across the globe providing full-fledged IoT services among numerous industry verticals such as:

Healthcare

It seems like almost every year, there is an extreme health crisis in a developing nation. But what if that could be prevented? Wearable tech devices called “Sensor, technology, and analytics to monitor, predict and protect Ebola patients” are scaled and shipped to international aid offices worldwide. Such kind of devices collect all data regarding the patient, i.e. from body temperature to oxygen saturation. And once the data is complete, doctors can ship it to a central location, where people can track patient’s health over time.

In short, tracking a group of people or a city as a whole can help with disease containment as well as migrant population tracking. Over time these sensors can help predict where an outbreak is going to spread, allowing enough aid workers to get to the infected area before it's too late. 

Water delivery

Do you know that billions of people in developing countries are going through their day-to-day lives drinking unsafe water? IoT cannot just help in monitoring both water quality, and water delivery but also alert municipalities when a water pump breaks, allowing for a quicker replacement time to ensure that an area's citizens are still getting enough, and quality water.

Agriculture

I am sure you must be well aware regarding the fact that there are many countries in the developing world that are still agriculturally based, where plenty of people still prefer working out in the fields. Here’s a good news for these people, around 75 million IoT devices will be agriculture-related by 2020.

Which means with the help of such devices, farmers can easily place them in soil to track acidity levels, as well as temperature, and crop growth so they can create a successful harvest.

City living

Cities like India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the world are some of the densest cities in terms of population. IoT devices can help with the traffic flow, by regulating lights based on the number of vehicles on the road, sensors placed in homes can help warn residents of impending disasters like fast-moving fires, mudslides, or other disasters, helping to save lives, as well as personal property.

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One of my LinkedIn contacts suggested me last year not to write more articles about MWC event. However, a couple of weeks ago talking with another contact that not attend this year told me he was expecting my article. So here it is, my fourth MWC article in a row since 2015. Am I a MWC addictYou can read previous articles here:

Unfortunately, the Powerful GSMA rejected my ticket request as Analyst / Press (LinkedIn please help me next year) and of course I did not pay the prohibitive prices of Silver Pass, Gold Pass and Platinum Pass. At the end, conference sessions content is very generic and I can read free the content. I cannot justify the ROI for pay these tickets. Can you?

Avoiding the politics issues between Catalonia and Spain, it was the first MWC where the snow was probably the biggest surprise of the show. The snow and the rain did not allowed visitors to spend some time outside.

A painI do not know the final numbers, but I notice this year less attendants than 2017. No doubt GSMA will try to find excuses eg, political issues, but the reality is that the cost of the show do not convince to many usual large / medium / small companies. It is a fact that some big companies did not attend or send less delegates and use less square meters

Again, visitors that attend 1 or 2 days do not have had time to move to other parallel events like 4YFN.  Running from meeting to meeting, bad lunch as usual. I'm sure I've lost weight these days

The MWC18 has been an evolution of what we saw last 2 years. Not revolution. We need to wait another 5 years to see some notorious technological advances although GSMA should continue helping to create a better future

Before #MWC18

I was angry with the Search exhibitor page of the web . Please GSMA you have 1 year to improve. None exhibitor has included any product in the category of Blockchain or Internet of Things. Duplicates filters, etc. I read some LinkedIn post and articles and talked with people to plan my visit and capture their feeling this year.

During the #MWC18

The euphoria of 5G has dropped – More info about 5G at MWC18 here “ Intel, Qualcomm Talk About Accelerating 5G Efforts at MWC 2018 

IoT - The word that describes my feeling is disappointment. Although expected, something sad because the word IoT begins to lose brightness and disappear from the stands. The Pavillion 8.0 dedicated to the IoT, was not star this year. Do you really deserve to be exhibitors at the MWC

At least it was good to pulse the evolution and transformation of the IoT / M2M market. A new impulse will be necessary before 2020

Unfortunately, I could not attend any of the Top 7 IoT Activities at Mobile World Congress. Please tell me if any of it was worth it.

It was funny to hear how Operators trying to explain the use cases of Blockchain in Telco sector.

Artificial Intelligence, Connected Vehicles and Robots the starts of MWC18.  It was interesting discuss with some Operators about the practical potential of Machine learning, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Robots in this sector.  The conclusion in this article “ You Can't Teach an AI to Run a Telecom Network—Yet.

MWC18 was in my opinion the year of the Connected Intelligent Vehicle. Operators, Technology Vendors and Car Manufacturers need to cooperate to avoid a technology nightmare for future drivers/passengers.   

After #MWC18

I cannot resist to compare this congress with the Groundhog Day festivities. I make no secret of my discomfort for the continuous decisions of GSMA to make this show useless for many. My unpleasantness for the prohibitive cost of the tickets, hotels in the town, and the arrogant executives who attend the event as movie stars and finally for the many parallel events that I have missed or meetings of 15 minutes because I had spent hours daily walking by the walk sides of Fira Halls and my frustration for not finding some companies in the labyrinth of  the pavilions

Like Bill Murray in the movie, I discover year after year that MWC's events repeating almost exactly. I feel I am trapped in a time loop that probably most of you are aware of

I am glad if you have spent these days indulging in night parties, looking for new jobs or cheering you for the work you have in your great company.  Luckily for me, I do not return depressed, but my mind do not escape for some days to the MWC loop. Am I a MWC addict?

See you next year at MWC19 Barcelona

 

Thanks for your Comments and Likes

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The Internet of Things (IoT) enables vendors to create an entirely new line of “smart” solutions for its existing and new markets. While the decision to go “smart” is straightforward, the decision of how to do so is not. Vendors are faced with a “build, buy, partner” decision – build it themselves, buy or license it from someone, or partner with a complementary solution provider and go to market together. This article discusses some of the key considerations product managers and executives must study in order to make the most appropriate decision.

 

“Build, buy, partner” is a strategic decision

For many vendors, IoT means adding a technology layer to products that never had any before. Even for tech savvy vendors, IoT presents a whole new set of technologies that they are less familiar with. Equally important, IoT is not just technology, but includes data, security, user experience, and business/business model elements. Figure One shows an IoT product management framework developed by Daniel Elizalde of TechProductManagement. A company going “smart” has a lot of decisions to make, of which technology is just one component.

Figure One. IoT Product Management Stack.

The framework shows that the “build, buy, partner” decision is multi-dimensional. There are six decision areas, spread across components from the edge to the user applications. Each represents a different “build, buy, partner” decision point, and each takes the company down a different path. In today’s fragmented and dynamic IoT ecosystem, many companies will need to “build, buy, partner” simultaneously. For example, cybersecurity is a specialized field that many vendors cannot address on their own, and must buy or license for their solution. The actual proportion of “build, buy, partner” each vendor does varies based on their specific situations.

Build

The company creates the solution themselves with the resources they own, control or contract to. Companies who choose this option, but have limited internal expertise may contract with Original Design Manufacturers (ODM). These ODMs provide a portfolio of services, from design, prototyping, test, certification, to manufacturing.

The “Build” option enables full management oversight of the development process, the solution functionality and the intellectual property. Conversely, this option may result in a longer time to market, and require additional capital and resources beyond what is scoped.

Companies consider this approach when:

  • They have the requisite skill sets and resources to do it
  • They can do it faster, cheaper and at lower risk
  • This is a strategic competence they own or want to own
  • There is strategic knowledge or critical intellectual property to protect
  • They are fully committed throughout the company

Buy

The company procures all or part of the solution components from a 3rd party. This includes licensing technology and services. Companies may also acquire technology through mergers and acquisitions, as well as buying the rights to technology from companies willing to part with it. This option eliminates “reinventing the wheel”, enables faster time to market, maximizes resource efficiency with limited execution risk. One common variant of this approach is to buy technology platform from a vendor, and then build their specific solution components on top of that. 

The downsides of the “Buy” option include a loss of control in the development process, and limited agility to respond in a timely manner to changes in the market and customer needs.

Companies consider this approach when:

  • They don’t have the skills or resources to build, maintain and support it
  • There is some or all of a solution in the marketplace and no need to “reinvent the wheel”
  • Someone can do it faster, better and cheaper than they can
  • They want to focus their limited resources in other areas that make more sense
  • Time is critical and they want to get to market faster
  • There is a solution in the market place that gives you mostly what you want.

Partner

The company allies itself with a complementary solution or service provider to integrate and offer a joint solution. This option enables both companies to enter a market neither can alone, access to specialized knowledge neither has, and a faster time to market. This option adds additional management and solution integration complexity. For some companies, reliance on partners for some aspects of the solution may be uncomfortable due to a limited loss of control.

Companies consider this approach when:

  • Neither party has the full offering to get to market on their own.
  • Each party brings specialized knowledge or capabilities, including technology, market access, and credibility.
  • It lowers the cost, time and risk to pursue new opportunities

 

Management considerations for “build, buy, partner”

Before the company chooses a path to go “smart”, executives and managers must base their decision along three “build, buy, partner” dimensions – execution, strategy, and transformation.

Execution

The first dimension focuses on the company’s ability to execute successfully. Managers must audit and assess their capabilities and resources to answer the following questions:

  • Do I have the necessary skills in-house to successfully develop, test, support and operate an IoT enabled “smart” solution and business (Figure One)?
  • Do I have the right human, capital, financial, and management resources to do this? Is this the best use of my resources relative to other initiatives and projects?
  • What am I willing to commit, sacrifice and re-prioritize to see this through? Am I willing to redeploy top management and company resources? How long am I willing to do this?
  • How much budget and resources am I willing to commit?
  • Is there anyone that can do it better than me? Does it make sense for me to do it? What am I willing to do and not do?
  • What infrastructure (processes, policies, systems) do I have, or need to build, maintain, support and operate these new solutions?

Strategy

The second dimension relates to the company’s current and future strategic needs. These are company specific as it relates to its current situation, its customer and channel, and its position within the industry. Key considerations to be addressed include:

  • How does going “smart” align with the company’s vision and strategy? Which parts align and which doesn’t? Does the vision and strategy need to be updated to reflect the realities of going “smart”?
  • How important is time to market? Do I need or want to be a first mover? How long will it take to execute with the resources that I have?
  • Am I trying to reach existing or new markets with IoT? Do I understand their needs well enough that I can execute on meeting it?
  • Do I have any critical proprietary technology, processes, and other intellectual property that I need to protect?
  • What are the risks? How much risk am I willing to tolerate? What are the costs of those risks? How much risk can I mitigate with my current capabilities?
  • How much control do I want or need to go “smart”? What areas do I want to control myself and how? Can I afford to control those areas?
  • What is your real value to customers and your channel? Why do they buy from you, and why do they come back? What do you do well?

Transformation

The third dimension is the company’s ability to manage transformation. Going “smart” doesn’t stop with the IoT technology. The entire organization, its operations, policies, systems and business models must transform to support and operate the “smart” business. Furthermore, resellers and service channels, and suppliers and partners, are also impacted.

  • What is your corporate culture and how well does it support change? Do you have the right people to manage and sustain this change? Are you nimble and agile?
  • What degree of disruption will there be to internal processes, channels, organization readiness, and business models? How agile are your current capabilities?
  • How prepared are you to operate a “smart” business? Do you have the skills and infrastructure required? Can you support a recurring revenue business model? How willing are you to invest in order to develop and sustain these capabilities?

 

What should you do next?

Each company is unique, and its situation will dictate its response to these dimensions. There is no one “right” universal answer to the “build, buy, partner” decision. Equally important, what’s right today, may not be right tomorrow. Companies that want to go “smart” start by looking inward first and doing the following:

  • Establish a current baseline. Audit and catalog current and planned offerings, strategy, human resources and skill sets, channel and suppliers, internal operations and policies, and culture.
  • Evaluate the IoT product management stack (Figure One) against your baseline using the three “smart” dimensions. The list of questions listed are starter questions, but answering those will lead to more questions to be addressed.
  • Evaluate and assess your company’s future state capabilities against the baseline using the three “smart” dimensions. Understand where the gaps are, and the extent of those gaps.
  • Identify your risk tolerance level. Going “smart” is not without risk, especially if you have never done it before. The key is to identify what and how much risk you are willing to take. Once you do so, you can develop a risk management plan and incorporate the appropriate tactics to manage it.
  • Update your business vision and strategy as applicable.
  • Develop your “build, buy, partner” decision and strategy. This strategy must align to the broader business vision and strategy.

 

About:

Benson Chan is an innovation catalyst at Strategy of Things, helping companies transform the Internet of Things into the Innovation of Things through its innovation laboratory, research analyst, consulting and acceleration (execution) services. He has over 25 years of scaling innovative businesses and bringing innovations to market for Fortune 500 and start-up companies. Benson shares his deep experiences in strategy, business development, marketing, product management, engineering and operations management to help IoTCentral readers address strategic and practical IoT issues.

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IoT Cyber-Security Puzzle

Image courtesy: Pixabay

I recently attended one of a significant [email protected] Internet of Things event which featured keynotes, speeches and presentations from CTOs/SVPs-Tech/VPs of major IT firms. Attending these presentations sometimes give you a feeling of being in literature or a rhetoric club where instead of hearing context oriented speeches you get to listen to a bunch of fairy tales with almost every sentence including overused adjectives like “trust”, “motivation”, “responsibility” and so on.  An SVP of a major IT player was asked about the measure (technical) her company takes to ensure data integrity and prevent cyber-attacks. Interestingly, her answer to this was the statement that “they maintain a culture of trust in and around the company”. To me, it is like standing in front of a hungry lion and telling him that you believe in non-violence. Today in the age of internet and IoT, we have to deal with thousands of cyber criminals (hungry lions) who are waiting to penetrate the system and make most out of it. To keep them out you need a lot more than just “trust”.  

On the same event, I had an opportunity to talk to many cybersecurity experts and companies, and I confronted them with a question of mentioning at least one relevant cybersecurity norm/standard/certificate pertinent for each major component in an IoT stack. Unfortunately, most of these discussions turned into some sales pitch. The question one can raise at this point is that is it so challenging to mention at least one “state of the art” cybersecurity measure for every IoT component? Or just that the topic is underestimated? 

This blog is just an attempt to name a relevant security standard/certificate or measure for every major element in IoT stack (see below) without going deep into the details of each and very standard/norm or certification. 

For this sake, we will assume a simple IoT stack as illustrated below :

 

Fig.1: IoT stack of a simple use case

In this use case, an industry sensor collects the physical parameters (temperature, pressure, humidity etc.) and transmit the values via Bluetooth/Wifi/wired connection to the gateway or edge device. The gateway device, depending on the type (simple or edge) perform a certain minimal calculation on the received data and push it into the cloud via a Wifi/4G connection. The cloud collects the data and uses this data to feed desired micro-services like analytics, anomaly detection etc. Cloud also offers an interface to the existing enterprise and resource planning (ERP) system to synchronize the running process with the current one as well to provide product /service related information over the IoT platform to the end user. What the user sees on his screen is then the dashboard of IoT use case which is a graphical representation of the micro-services running in the background. 

As we can see, there are four to five main stages and at least three interfaces (sensor-gateway, gateway-cloud, cloud-user) in a typical IoT use case. These stages and interfaces are on the target of cybercriminals who try to hack into the system with the intention of either manipulating or hi-jacking the system. Safeguarding just the components is not adequate. The underlying IoT communication layer (Bluetooth/Wifi/4G etc.) need to be secured as well.  Also, organisations running or involved in such IoT use cases must ensure safety and integrity of the process, technical as well as user data through a certain information security management system (ISMS) in place. 

To sum up, we need security measures at a component, communication-interface and organisational levels. Now if I have to write state of the art or “best in class” security measure (excluding cryptography) next to each stage, communication type and interfaces in the diagram above, then the resulting picture might look like the one below. 

 

Fig.2: IoT stack with relevant cyber-security measure

 

What, in your opinion, could be included/excluded or replaced in this diagram? Feel free to share your opinion.

 

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With so many companies and people on the search for the "IoT killer app” for a decade, and nobody has found it yet ☹. You can be sure that I do not either, otherwise I would not be writing this article and I will be furiously developing it.

Most companies are anxiously looking for the killer IoT app/solution, which their IoT reps could sell in volume to their enterprise customers. The bad news for them: “ there’s no true “killer app” for IoT and that any company can create the right killer app to solves a business need of a customer or a whole industry.

Nevertheles we can not avoid that some people think pet care or fitness could be the "killer app" for IoT, while others instead think that the killer IoT app winners will be in Verticals like predictive maintenance in manufacturing, smart home or smart city solutions and also I had read funny opinions that considers measuring Temperature and Humidity seem the killer application for most of the IoT industry. The comment is comical but at the same time ironic. In the absence of bright or innovative ideas it seems that we would have discovered the fire when we install sensors and we are able to visualize temperature and humidity in real time on the screen of our smartphone.

Instead of continuing to dream of finding the Holy Grail of the IoT, I think it will be more productive to analyse by categories what are the possible IoT applications that exist and if I am enlightened try to guess which application would be the milk to launch myself to develop it without fearThese are the 5 categories to search for the IoT horizontal Killer app:

  1. IoT-Search
  2. IoT-Messaging
  3. IoT-Security
  4. IoT-Commerce
  5. IoT-Social

Summary

Search for the killer IoT horizontal application is a chimera given the definition of the IoT. However, the challenges that the IoT has to achieve that 50 billion machines can be found, communicate safely through various networks, socialize and favour the monetization of its services, open great opportunities for hardware and software engineers to develop different killer applications. And I'm sure some will find it. I wish I could be part of one of them.

Thanks for your Likes, Comments and Shares

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5 IIoT Use Cases from Global Leaders

“I talk to a dozen or more companies involved in IoT every week. One thing they all have in common is their desire for the projected IoT volumes and revenues to come to fruition...the sooner the better”.

Mike Krell

Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy covering the Internet of Things, Forbes.

 

Internet of things has always been functioning in a context of business transformation.

If you’re in business, just read on, as we are to have several working IIoT solutions to consider right now.

 

To be successful today you need to:

  1. really love what you do;
  2. move with the times;
  3. make the IIoT technology a part of your business development plan;
  4. and find an Industrial IoT company for you to cooperate with.

Here I gathered 5 IIoT solutions implemented by global industry leaders and the key examples of their efficient cooperation with IoT developers:

 

#1 Predictive Maintenance for Wind Energy

 

The IIoT solution is projected to be implemented into the maintenance of wind energy. The smart wind turbines will be applied to reveal how employees can get additional insights by using ML about the equipment performance in different conditions. Thus, smart sensors are supposed to give the information in a real-life regime.

The system can give reliable statistics for the future planning and help to replace vital parts of the engines during the less windy periods:

Source: Schaeffler Group & IBM

 

#2 Health Detectors for Caterpillar Equipments

 

Recently, the American machinery and equipment giant, Caterpillar implemented a new IIoT solution to help its customers better understand the workability and health of the equipment. It should also be said that the company uses IoT solutions for tracking fuel efficiency, idle times, location, and many more. The new project lets clients directly address the company maintenance service and timely repair the sensitive spots by using the IoT platform.

The end-to-end platform for predictive diagnostics allows for better monitoring and timely replacement of the interchangeable parts. The Caterpillar CEO, Doug Oberhelman supposes the IIoT, which is primarily applied to the fleet and fuel monitoring, will take the clients offering to the next level.

 

#3 Airbus Smart Manufacturing

 

You know the biggest European aircraft manufacturer has already applied the IoT solutions to its products. Today Airbus is working at implementing the IIoT to the tools its workers use during the manufacturing process.

For this reason, Airbus opts to involve its employees and the factory floor. The workers will manage to use smart tablets or glasses to evaluate a task and then send the data to a robotic tool that will finish it.

Jean-Bernard Henz, the head of PLM R&T Innovation at Airbus ICT, says the IoT platform manufacturing will speed up the processes and improve the reliability of the production.

 

#4 Siemens -- a 75% automated plant

 

You know the Siemens AG plant is a part of a concerted effort by the German government to develop fully automated factories. Guess what? Siemens is claimed to be 75% automated with 1,150+ employees on board.

All the employees are mainly operating computers and monitoring the process of manufacturing by using the IIoT solutions. Sinalytics, which is a critical component of the IIoT Platform was implemented in 2015. Today Siemens continues developing the Web of System, which directly connects devices to the open Internet and with each other. Besides, Siemens launched a new company in 2016 that is named Innovations AG. The company is dedicated to the search and support of the emerging start-ups that can be a good technological investment for Siemens. This has influenced the factory efficiency, opened the new technological opportunities and reduced costs.

https://twitter.com/Siemens/status/935795639472021506

 

#5 ThyssenKrupp Elevates IIoT Implementation

 

The CGI global tech firm claims ‘that thing is an elevator’ for the company. Well, let’s see it. Having joined forces with Microsoft and CGI, the ThyssenKrupp Elevator company has now obtained a predictive maintenance for elevators manufacturing.

The IIoT solution securely connects tens of thousands of sensors and elevators systems across the plant. The technology allows for monitoring every stage of production starting from motor temperature and finishing with shaft alignment. The real-life IIoT gathered data lets the company identify vulnerabilities and repair them before an actual breakdown occurs:

https://twitter.com/thyssenkrupp_en/status/964787252629946368

 

What’s the bottom line?

IIoT solutions undoubtedly contribute to production efficiency. The predictive maintenance and pre-emptive repair, manufacturing automation and further spending cuts are just a tiny bit of what I recorded here.

I am almost done here...

Feel like you have something to tell about your IIoT use case?

Drop me a line below!

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The Internet of Things — or IoT — is taking the IT sector by storm. Although it only boasted two billion systems in 2006, it's set to reach 200 billion connected devices by 2020 — and even more beyond that.

As companies and consumers all continue to explore the benefits of the IoT, one thing has become clear: the IoT needs proper encryption.

Given the sheer amount of online and network-oriented threats today — including everything from traditional viruses to advanced malware and malicious computer coding — data encryption is necessary to ensure the long-term success of the IoT.

Establishing these protocols while the IoT is still in its infancy will provide additional integrity to IoT-fueled projects and generate increased interest in the platform as a whole.

Overcoming the Roadblocks to Success

Modern society is well on its way to embracing the IoT for everything from industrial automation to in-home convenience, but there are two significant roadblocks to the platform's success.

1. Power Consumption

Today's IoT networks, which contain servers, access points and peripheral devices, consume enormous amounts of power altogether, but some tools require more power than others. 

While traditional network-level encryption tools are optimized for larger systems and infrastructure, they don't always scale down to smaller formats in an efficient or viable manner.

Developing a chip with higher energy efficiency and the ability to scale down minimizes the strain on current and local power grids and makes it easier to secure individual devices via existing encryption methods. 

2. Data Security

Consumers have received an enormous dose of reality in the 21st century. Those who haven't fallen victim to a cyber attack or hack probably know someone who has. The number of data breaches involving consumer information is troubling.

There are even rumors of foreign entities interfering with U.S. elections, including the 2016 election of President Donald Trump. Data security is in the spotlight now more than ever before, and it's a tremendous obstacle for the IoT to overcome.

However, a new chip manufactured by the team at MIT solves both of these problems. Not only does it focus specifically on public-key encryption — a straightforward and user-friendly method of modern encryption — but it also consumes 1/400 of the power of comparable chips.

It also uses 90% less memory than current chips, which lets researchers execute commands and complete processes up to 500 times faster.

Encrypting Consumer Data via Mathematics

The newest chip utilizes elliptic-curve encryption. It's a highly sophisticated, dominant form of data security often used in HTTPS connections. MIT's latest advancement efficiently breaks this system down for use on the individual devices that comprise the IoT.

As noted by the team at MIT, "cryptographers are coming up with curves with different properties."

The new chip is flexible enough to support all the known curves in use today, giving it maximum compatibility with different organizational and governmental standards. The team hopes to implement additional support for any future curves, as well.

Making Advancements in Artificial Intelligence

The team at MIT is also making headlines in the area of artificial intelligence (AI). Between self-driving cars and increased automation both in the factory and the home, AI is a hotbed of debate. Whether consumers are in favor of automation or against the idea altogether, one thing is for sure: AI-driven robots must operate by an acceptable set of ethical standards.

Just like encryption, it's a subject that invites multiple interpretation and solutions.

To spur development into the future of AI ethics and programming, MIT recently took a poll of the online public. By seeking the input of the average consumer, the school hopes to play an essential role in how next-gen robotics make decisions, prioritize tasks and interact with their human counterparts on a daily basis.

How MIT Is Safeguarding Our Future

Between the increased need for data security and sophisticated AI, IT experts have their work cut out for them.

The work of individuals and groups like the team at MIT is already making headway into these areas, but society is only at the beginning of what will likely become a long-term, complicated relationship with technology.

Image by Kevin Ku

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IoT security challenges

 

IoT is a complex network of billions of Internet-connected devices that collect and transmit huge amounts of data across of a wide range of devices (sensors, robots, machinery, mobile apps, digital assistants, etc.) and integrated systems. Also, the data have to pass different administrative boundaries with different policies. Certainly, all of it creates challenges for protecting the IoT ecosystem.

First, companies and organizations have to ensure privacy and confidentiality of user data. Second, data communications should be protected at all levels. So, when building an IoT solution, take care of the “right” data delivery including the right place, time, and form. Third, make all interactions traced and monitored so that suspicious activities will be instantly detected.

There are many IoT security risks and challenges you should know and prevent when developing an IoT project. In terms of increased worry about cyber attacks and data privacy, companies have to establish new security models and integrate innovative technologies. In the IoT world, the use of Blockchain is an emerging trend promising to solve most or even all of IoT security issues.

 

What is Blockchain

 

Blockchain is a technology of the distributed ledger that maintains a continuously increasing number of transactions. Representing an immutable and inconvertible record and being based on cryptographic algorithms, Blockchain provides data security and protects data.

As Blockchain is decentralized, there is no central authority or regulatory body required for transaction approval and management. A distributed technology nature makes computer servers to come to a consensus, allowing transactions to be carried out anonymously and without intermediaries.

Blockchain is also about trust: cryptography is used to prevent technical data forge and distortion. In the chain of blocks, each block contains a hash serving as a link to the previous one. Thus, it’s impossible to substitute an intermediate block in the finished chain.

So, Blockchain provides a high-security level. While the tool is the same, it has many successful applications in a variety of business industries. Mika Lammi, Kinno’s Head of IoT Business Development, Kouvola Innovation Ltd, said: “I believe Blockchain to be one of the truly disruptive and innovative application areas in the world now, and that it will create huge waves across all imaginable business sectors”.

 

Blockchain and IoT

 

Coming up with decentralized, autonomous, and data protection capabilities, Blockchain has a great potential to secure the IoT ecosystem. In the Internet of Things, Blockchain can keep an immutable record of connected devices’ activities and automatically maintain the history of their communications.

What’s more, by integrating the technology, companies and organizations can allow trustless safe message exchanges between IoT devices. In this case, Blockchain will work like in financial transactions: data is transmitted between multiple devices and delivered to the places required. To enable peer-to-peer messaging, businesses can integrate Ethereum smart contracts serving as the agreement between two parties.

For example, let’s take Blockchain and IoT linked together to improve manufacturing operations. Here the use of Blockchain can enable smart devices to not only exchange data, but even automatically execute financial transactions. IoT devices monitor machinery and equipment health, alert managers about problems, and order repairs when required.

In the agriculture industry, farmers can place IoT devices to collect data about crops in order to ensure an efficient functioning of the irrigation system. Smart contracts describe how the solution parts (analytics system, sensors, etc.) should behave based on the conditions defined. This approach helps provide automatic water management.

 

Blockchain advantages for IoT security:

 

  1. Immutable record of all data communications
  2. Monitoring of suspicious activities
  3. Prevention of data forge and distortion
  4. Peer-to-peer messaging between IoT devices
  5. Autonomous functioning of smart devices

 

Today, Blockchain is one of the most promising trends in IoT security field. Decentralized and data protection capabilities make Blockchain a perfect part of IoT solutions. Understanding the technology prospects, many companies have already integrated Blockchain to solve IoT security challenges.

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Be careful of the Walking Dead of IoT

Those who follow my articles know that I like to make comparisons between the IoT and TV shows and movies. For this article, I have selected the famous show "The Walking Dead" (TWD).

When preparing this article, I read this piece “The Real Walking Dead: Surviving the Software-Defined Zombie Apocalypse” by Scott Noteboom and I thought, well, I am not alone. As Scott, I see a lot of similarities between IoT technology and biology.

Many companies are thinking about their survival after the apocalypse that will be produced by the mix of IoT, AI and Blockchain. CEOs, must make decisions that prevent their companies from disappearing or worse becoming walking dead. And one of the most important will be choose their travel companions well, in order to build a strong ecosystem capable of resist the most adverse scenarios one might think.

IoT solutions that companies need to implement to survive the apocalypse are composed of many apparently simple blocks (devices, protocols, edge computing, fog computing, communication networks, platforms, cloud, analytics, AI, Machine Learning, blockchain, security, applications). But the selection of the vendors and the integration of all of them in the business processes, systems and organizations of companies is complex and there are few companies who can boast of having achieved it.

You probably are tired of hearing that the IoT is very complicated and the ecosystem is very fragmented. You feel that many will become walking dead. But, no one has the crystal ball to know who will be the IoT companies are going to continue within 10 years, not even within 1, 2 or 3 years. Some of them are perhaps in the phase of becoming, when just a couple of years ago they were in good health and of they enjoyed the sympathy of the analysts.

If you have been living in a sanctuary, isolated, it will not last for a long time. You will receive soon the visit of survivors and walking dead. You have to decide to accept or fight the survivors and you must protect your community against the zombies.

The good news is that you are not alone. During the last 5 years I have lived 24x7 by and for the IoT. I have been monitoring and analyzing the IoT landscape. I have seen many IoT start-ups appear and some disappear. We have seen large companies make absurd purchases, or sell IoT businesses when they have not been able to obtain the expected return.

That´s why I am able to provide wise advice and recommendation to avoid from being trapped by partnerships with potentials Walking Dead of the IoT and help you build robust and scalable IoT solutions.

Do not walk blind alone among The Walking Dead of IoT

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The Internet of Things plays an important role in today’s life, affecting a plenty of businesses and changing the way we work, live, and entertain. Coming up with workflow automation, remote equipment monitoring, inventory tracking, and real-time data collection, IoT promises to bring innovation in various industries.

Understanding high IoT potential, companies and corporations invest in IoT projects, startups, and initiatives. According to New IDC Spending Guide, the worldwide IoT spending is predicted to reach nearly $1.4 trillion in 2021. What’s more, Gartner research expects the number of IoT-enabled devices will be about 21 billion by 2020.

Though IoT provides many advantages and opportunities, there remain IoT security risks and challenges, that now are of the highest concern. Since today almost everything can be hacked, businesses have to look for and integrate new security mechanisms allowing to ensure data and device protection.

 

The main IoT security risks

 

1. Data Leaks

Smart devices collect and transmit various data that may involve such important information as credit card numbers, zip codes, customer locations, camera images, IP addresses, and much more. A leakage of private/personal/business/financial data can lead a company to money and reputation losses, and harm people’s lives.

2. User verification

Misconfiguration and default passwords use are common reasons for the appearance of device/data vulnerabilities. That’s why engineers should implement the ability for customers to create their own passwords while establishing the highest level of password reliability that all users have to follow.

3. Lack of regulations

Unfortunately, there are often no regulations for IoT devices. The creation of a standards-based approach to security should be a top-priority task for companies, organizations, and even governments.

4. Unknown surveillance

Often unprotected IoT devices can be accessed by any remote user or at least can be easily hacked. The consequences can be poor: for instance, streaming and selling private videos and images (including those from stores, shopping centers, etc.).

 

IoT security recommendations

 

1. Focus on data traffic monitoring. Imagine a cloud IoT solution, that monitors both inbound and outbound traffic, traces all suspicious activities, blocks unsafe communications, instantly alerts users and the central system about potential problems, and prevents data leaks.

2. Implement end-to-end encryption in your application, the most reliable way to protect user data. Famous mobile messengers WhatsApp and Viber added the support of e2e encryption long ago. If your project implies many data/user communications, you can use this approach too.

3. Use reliable tools that help ensure data confidentiality and privacy as well as build a secure and scalable data storage. Integrate a feature of suspicious activity and malicious code monitoring. For example, today we can see an increasing use of AI technology for real-time security monitoring.

4. Focus on testing activities. When developing an IoT solution, pay a lot of attention to the testing/QA process. It’s much better to prevent any security issues at the pre-release stage than waste time for bug fixing after.

5. Integrate a Blockchain decentralized approach. Since Blockchain is based on cryptographic algorithms, it helps protect and manage data. Blockchain has all transactions (interactions) recorded, so the history of smart devices will be also recorded. At the moment, the use of Blockchain for securing the Internet of Things is one of the emerging and most promising trends.

 

As you see, there are really good ways to minimize IoT security vulnerabilities. Here I should note that one of the best recommendations for developing a successful IoT project is to apply to a reliable IT company that would focus on security and data privacy issues. Also, when choosing the company, pay attention whether it meets the GDPR requirements, which will be especially important from the regulation enforcement on May 25, 2018.

 

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The Invisible Threat to Your Health - IOT

Consider the normal hospital or home care scenario today. A patient—your patient—is receiving different therapy intravenously. That IV fluid is being administered using a pump known as an infusion pump.

Today those infusion pumps are connected to a network of devices on a hospital’s internet network.

Now consider the ramifications of an outsider hacking into the network and controlling all of the devices on that network, as well as being able to access all of the medical records on the network and to create a serious danger to the hospital and all of the connected patients. It’s a threat that is invisible and one that you don’t really think about but the potential is there.

It’s a scenario that is more than plausible, it’s actually taken place. There have been insulin pumps hacked multiple times.  Johnson & Johnson became the first company to warn their users about the potential for hacks in their insulin pumps.

Billy Rios wrote about it for Bloomberg and even the FDA has taken notice, very recently stating that they knew that there were problems with medical devices and that sufficient security in those devices was probably not in place. They said that the current regulations and the current controls were not enough.

Recently the FDA released a set of guidelines that were designed to assist in this conundrum. They are encouraging all medical device manufacturers to make their cyber-security stronger and to ensure that clients and patients could not be damaged by hacks to products.

This was in response to Executive Order 13636 and Presidential Policy Directive 21,but it was also a response to the many cyber-security experts who have written directives and voiced their concerns about the problems inherent in connected medical devices.

There are dozens of problems with IoT medical devices and their ability to be hacked, but it isn’t just medical devices that are used directly for patient treatment. Other problems have been found in devices such as x-ray machines and MRI machines that allow them to be breached and require a fix in order to ensure patient safety.

Despite actual white hat hacks and security concerns voiced by experts, many legal experts say that the harm caused or the potential to harm is pure speculation. Reed Smith partner Steven Bornian believes that no medical device will ever be completely secure and that no IoT or medical device risk may be completely eradicated. That means legislating the security for them simple is not feasible, but still that seems to be the way that governments are heading.

The FDA has, for now, focused their approach to this problem on encouraging companies to offer workarounds for the user and temporary fixes if there is a breach. They believe this may be better than trying to regulate or legislate companies to prevent the breaches entirely, which many experts say may be impossible.

That isn’t going to be a long lasting solution because even as we discuss it, things are changing. Countries are seeking the right legislation for use in protecting the data and the patients who use medical devices. Having an on-board cybersecurity specialist is going to be imperative for any company offering connected devices in the near future. Is your company ready?

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Healthcare is undeniably one of the most important industries. The quality of medical treatment and patient care directly impact the quality of life. The integration of innovative technological solutions in the domain brings workflow automation, patient treatment, operation, and service improvement.

IoT plays a huge role in the healthcare. By 2020 the global IoT healthcare market is predicted to reach $163.24 billion. At the moment, 60% of healthcare providers have already adopted IoT applications and successfully use them in their work.

According to Aruba Networks research, healthcare organizations implement IoT applications mainly for patient monitoring and maintenance (73%) and remote operation and control (50%).

There is a wide range of IoT medical solutions effectively used by healthcare providers: wearables, smart pills, smart beds, biosensors, robots, glucose measurement devices, equipment monitoring devices, remote monitoring systems, RTHS (Real-time Health Systems), and more.

The connected hospital

There is a variety of IoT use cases for hospitals to integrate and make the environment totally connected. RFID and IoT-enabled devices, IoT-enabled assets and traditional IoT cross-industry applications including predictive maintenance of hospital assets, connected equipment, gathering real-time data, and tracking of healthcare devices. Going deeper there is robotics for routine tasks and complex operations.

Concerning examples, monitoring of medical equipment allows to track its “health”, predict, when some part will need replacement, alert about breaks, and automatically order repairs when required.

Beacons and motion sensors enable healthcare providers to track medical equipment, employees, and even patients in real-time, resulting in the improvement of patient care, right estimations of staff work efficiency and patient health status, and a lot more.

Speaking of connected patients, IoT technology can be successfully used for sending them automatic reminders about taking medication, health check-ups, and appointments with mobile applications. Thus, connected IoT hospitals result in more advanced data, enhanced patient treatment, cost savings, and workflow automation.

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Securing our Future Energy - with IOT

 Is our Oil Production Too Reliant on Big Data? Are “Digital Oil Fields” Vulnerable in a Big Way?

The ‘digital oil field” is growing dramatically. In 2011 the market was about 18.7 billion. By 2014 it had grown to 24.6 billion dollars and at this rate of growth it is projected to be at 33 billion by 2022.

There are myriad benefits to the digital oil fields. Speed, efficiency and lower cost are but a few. Today, control rooms, devices used to manage the production plants, refineries, pipelines and even oil producing substations as well as the wells themselves are digital. They are using high speed data links, video technology and even digitally managed drilling rigs to bring us the energy that we need.

Still further upstream, we’re seeing drilling resources, computer assisted well fracturing and preventive maintenance seen on the wells. Each of these areas has the capacity to be hacked or breached in some way and untold damage done to our energy supply as well as many other things.

According to the Journal of Petroleum Technology, the offshore oil fields can create more than ¾ of a terabyte of data every single day. Oil fields and reserves are becoming much more rare. Companies are literally scrambling in order to keep ahead of their competition.

IHS CERA says that digital oilfield implementation means that companies may achieve more than 25 percent savings in the cost of operation using digital technology and they may see about 8-10 percent higher production. As oil fields become much rarer, the production boost will make the difference between having enough energy and an energy shortage.

The National Grid and the utilities that we depend on every day are dependent on computers. It’s a given that anything that is reliant upon computers can be vulnerable to very significant threats from hackers and other nefarious creatures.

The oil and gas companies around the world are increasingly dependent on computers and that means they are a big target. The oil and gas fields today are so reliant that it’s become a source of great concern for regulatory bodies as well as those who rely heavily on the production.

Multiple attacks against oil and gas have already taken place.In July of 2014, A Russian hacker group targeted energy companies with Energetic Bear Virus. Physical systems were disabled and energy consumption monitoring took place.

Other attacks include DDoS attacks and even ransomware. ABI Research did a study that predicted that by 2018, just a year from now that attacks against the oil and gas sector will drive nearly 2 billion dollars in security spending.

What other kinds of attacks could take place using the oil and gas sector? How can we halt this and what will it take to prevent problems from taking place. It is imperative that gas and oil develop the capacity to protect against cyber attacks and to prevent major risks?

Do you believe legislating cybersecurity -forcing companies to secure their devices is the right answer or or is there a better way to accomplish that?

 

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Blockchain and IIoT

 

Blockchain and IoT both are present in the Gartner’s Hype Cycle 2017.

Clubbing Blockchain and IoT bring the Intelligent Digital Mesh

The Intelligent Digital Mesh

Gartner calls the entwining of people, devices, content, and services the intelligent digital mesh. It’s enabled by digital models, business platforms and a rich, intelligent set of services to support digital business.

Intelligent: How AI is seeping into virtually every technology and with a defined, well-scoped focus can allow more dynamic, flexible and potentially autonomous systems.

Digital: Blending the virtual and real worlds to create an immersive digitally enhanced and connected environment.

Mesh: The connections between an expanding set of people, business, devices, content and services to deliver digital outcomes [2]

 

What is Industrial IoT? 

The term industrial Internet of things (IIoT) is often encountered in the manufacturing industries, referring to the industrial subset of the IoT.

Uses cases of Industrial IoT

Industrial Internet of Things brings a lot of advantages some of them are listed below:

  • Predictive & Proactive maintenance
  • Real-Time Monitoring
  • Asset/Resource Optimization
  • Remote Diagnosis

but all these are under the security threat. Blockchain has begun to have a significant influence on the Internet of Things by enhancing security, empowering the incorporation of an increasing number of devices into the ecosystem. The enhancements in IoT device security facilitate faster adoption of this revolutionary innovation and will open up a wide range of possibilities for enterprises in the days to come.

 

Blockchain and IIoT

IIoT solutions using blockchain can be built to maintain a continuously growing list of cryptographically secured data records protected against alteration and modification. It can set up trust, accountability, and transparency while streamlining business processes.

 

1. Blockchain reducing the cost of IIoT Solution 

It is important for IoT edge devices to reduce processing overhead and eliminate the 'middle man' (IoT gateways) from the procedure. Communication, data exchanges, and device information are conducted on a peer-to-peer basis, removing any additional traditional protocol, hardware, or communication overhead costs.

 

 2. Blockchain confirm and enable the trust

Blockchain empowering Industrial IoT solution with trust. It empowers devices to engage in transactions and communications with trusted parties. While device A may not know device B, and may not believe it verifiably, a permanent record of exchanges and information from devices stored on the blockchain confirm and enable the vital trust for organizations, individuals, and devices to cooperate.

 

3. Accelerate Data Exchanges 

Blockchain eliminates the role of “ IoT gateway” or an intermediate device, which helps in improving data exchange in the process of data transfer. Peer-to-peer device based contracts and ledgers (blockchain) decrease time required to complete device information exchange and processing time.

 

4. Blockchain scaled security in  IIoT Solution 

Decentralized technologies hold great promise for a system that needs to handle storing and retrieving information of millions—if not billions—of connected devices. These future systems have to provide low latency, high throughput, querying, permissions, and decentralized control

 

 

Conclusion

Blockchain and IoT Solution in the Framework - 

Ease of Implementation and Business Impact

High Business Impact and Ease of Implementation put this in the Quick win quadrant.

For Industrial Implementation- Lot of Frameworks, options are available from Ethereum to Hyperledger. IBM Hyperledger Fabric development in the past few months is noticeable.

Ease of Blockchain Implementation is a business challenge rather than a test of technology implementation as it involves connecting multiple parties across multiple processes.  

 

 

References:

  1. https://www.gartner.com/smarterwithgartner/top-trends-in-the-gartner-hype-cycle-for-emerging-technologies-2017/
  2. https://www.gartner.com/smarterwithgartner/gartner-top-10-strategic-technology-trends-for-2018/
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The past decade witnessed the emergence of two of the most significant technologies- virtual reality and Internet of Things.

Virtual reality refers to the use of technology to counterfeit an environment where the digital world seems real. It aims to place the user inside an experience, consequently enabling them to interact with the 3D worlds. On the other hand, Internet of Things is all about making real-world objects connect and manipulate in the digital world.

While both these technologies work to bring augmented ease to our lives, it's the convergence of the two that offer the most promising opportunities. Becoming quickly enmeshed in the prevailing times, the two disruptive technologies have largely revolutionized the industrial platform.

The meeting point of the two technologies boasts of immense potential. Let’s understand this with some examples.

1) Telepresence

The encroachment of telepresence depicts the colossal potential of the confluence of IoT and VR. If we talk about a typical video conference, the system includes a monitor screen, sound system, and codec. You can add additional speakers or a projector screen to improve the video conference experience. However, with telepresence, it is not the same.

With an aim to extend near lifelike audio and video quality, telepresence leverages compound multi-codec, multi-monitor, and multi-speakers. It has successfully transformed the way we can communicate with others over long distances. It offers the ability to look and move freely within a real-world environment, giving the illusion of actually being present there.

Telepresence has efficaciously eliminated the time and financial constraints related to travel. Offering all the benefits of a face-to-face interaction, it has made long-distance meetings exceedingly convenient.

2) Virtual Smart Cities

An increasing number of cities around the world are looking to become “smart” in order to improve comfort, reduce costs and consumption of resources and augment the quality of life of its citizens. Consequently, for the concept to materialize, it is significant that Internet of Things along with its accessibility to public grows. This will enable adequate accurate data to be amassed in cities for analysis and forecasting.

Moving ahead, these cities need to be integrated into a well-controlled virtual environment. This will allow an accurate analysis of the prevailing city conditions as well as help in making predictions of the impending future scenario. Thus, any kind of risk or disaster can be effectively monitored to simulate its effects.

3) Healthcare

The union of VR and IoT technologies has greatly assisted the healthcare field by bringing improved ease to patients as well as doctors. A competent example of this is robotic-assisted surgery, which has been in use for quite some time now. Also known as da Vinci Surgical System, it allows the surgeons to perform a least invasive surgery. A camera along with a few tools is inserted into the body through a relatively small opening that allows the surgeon to get a full view of the operating area without exposing the patient to the ordeal of a large incision.

The system includes a 3D HD vision system and small wristed devices that revolve and bend much better than the human hand, thus enabling improved vision, control, and accuracy.

But, this is just the beginning. It is anticipated that VR surgeries will soon control real da Vinci systems, permitting surgeons to operate on patients while sitting in their offices.

Final Thoughts

Considering the potential of the two technologies, more and more companies are investing into the development of new applications of both virtual reality and internet of things and because of that, in past several years so many IoT App development companies has been evolved in the market. In the following year, it is predicted to see a growing number of integration of smart objects within virtual simulations, for purposes such as leisure, training, or damage prevention.

 

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The Meltdown and Spectre microprocessor bugs not only compromise billions of desktops, laptops, servers, clouds, tablets and smartphones, they also put tens of billions more embedded, IoT, and control systems at risk.

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The IoT is one of those amazing bits of technology that will give us a remarkable edge. It will also cut both ways. It is automating many jobs and making them much easier to do and offering very lucrative jobs for those who are in possession of the right skill set.

Still, its unavoidable that IoT is going to kill many jobs. In manufacturing alone the IoT is going to eliminate millions of jobs as they are replaced by what machines can do.

Add to that the fact that IoT and cognitive computing combined are going to threaten many top level and very prestigious positions as our advancing computers learn how to do jobs that require thought as opposed to just mechanical tasks.

Make AI and IoT Work Harder to Your Benefit. 

The intelligent employee is going to try to find the best way to leverage the changes in AI and the rapidly growing power of IoT. Thomas Davenport, professor at Babson College recommends that employees who are concerned about losing their jobs look for ways to use the power of AI and IoT as opposed to allowing it to automate jobs alone.

Tap Into Crowd Powe . 

According to Tripp Braden who recruits for Strategic Performance Partner ” “Most businesses are built on the idea of an ideal worker being like an eagle, strong, self-motivated, and independent worker.” The typical model is becoming a lot more team powered and companies and individuals need to take advantage of that in order to future proof their jobs.

Tamara McCleary agreed with that assessment. “As we head into a new age, we are disrupting the notion of one job being completely distinct from another. IoT is also leading to shifts in collaboration between fields,” McCleary continued to state that . “It is breaking down barriers between different fields such as big data, security, energy and utilities, smart buildings, and industrial manufacturing. And for many companies, IoT is enabling a transition from product to services. This shift demands more skill versatility from workers.”

Be an Expert in Your Field and Constantly Learn.

Its not enough to become an expert, but you must also learn consistently and continue to grow in your chosen career field. If some area of that field is being automated, becoming an expert in the automation and how it can benefit your company is going to future proof your job and keep you ahead of the game.

Build Your Own Brand. 

Become what is known as a thought leader in your area. Even if you don’t know all that there is to know about Iot or AI, get great professional head shots. Build your brand on LinkedIn and also on social media such as Facebook and Twitter. If you’re visible only on LinkedIn, with just 184 million users and you are conspicuously absent on Facebook (1.5 billion users) then you’re not doing as much as you could be to build that brand and surpass the other thought leaders in your arena.

Make Smart Choices.

Whatever business you are in, make smart choices and decisions that will future proof your job. Gather as much data as you can and use it to make better business decisions that will show you up as a leader in thought and in action.

Be Creative and Be Forward Thinking.

What works today in IoT and your job isn’t going to work tomorrow. Be willing to adapt in order to overcome obstacles and problems in your job. In order to future proof your position, you’re going to have to be willing to change as rapidly and as dramatically as IoT is changing.

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The Internet of Things is now widely used in a wide array of business verticals like manufacturing, healthcare, logistics, and more. According to the latest research data, the number of IoT connected devices, which made up ~4,9 million things in 2015, reached the point of ~3,9 billion in 2016.

Concerning AR, Statista predicts at least three various scenarios of AR/VR growth, but they all forecast the economic impact amounting ~$29,5 billion in 2020. Having reached the decision of developing your own IoT or AR software, you need to get heads up about the pitfalls of starting this new business solution development.

Major AR and IoT solutions’ programming challenges.

Challenges may be divided into several categories: high-level business obstacles and application development problems along with the solution’s further maintenance and enhancement. The first group may include the following issues:

  • Unclear business benefits;
  • Insufficient funding;
  • A poor go-to-market strategy, and more;

While it’s quite clear how to avoid business-level problems, it’s also worth taking into account the challenges which arise during the software development process itself. The average IoT obstacles may include:

  • Infrastructure problems (devices, gateways, platforms);
  • Security concern;
  • Cross-platform compatibility;
  • Lack of support, and more.

AR development challenges encompass:

  • AR hardware;
  • Generated content;
  • Security issues, and more;

With reference to the latest Cisco’s survey, only 26% of IoT projects considered as successful by their developers, whereas more than 50% reach the jumping-off place at the strategy crafting stage. One of the key AR challenges is to correlate virtual data with the real environment, which can bring even a leading vendor to a screwjob. For this very reason, it’s critically important to have an idea of technology development nuances.

Nevertheless, the latest statistics on the number of the internet connected devices and the AR technology in various spheres shows that a business owner is a targeted consumer for the outputs. This gives extra room for the IoT and AR initiatives:

Statistics reveals the amount of investment made worldwide in IoT by sectors during 2015-2020.


Statistics shows AR technology’s market share by business spheres.

2 notable IoT/AR use cases

In the context of solving the task, below are the two living examples of successful solutions to take into account while initiating your own development project.

E.g.: IoT mobile app for smart buildings and yachts management:

The idea was to develop a highly customizable system allowing to manage numerous connected devices in smart buildings/yachts.

Challenge:

A necessity to run a proprietary protocol in remoteness from real devices.

Solution:

Multiple devices installed within a building/yacht were united into a single smart system. A proprietary text protocol which provided smooth communication between the user interface and the backend was applied for infrastructure visualization configuration, gateways, and IR-gateways communication. This permitted cutting down on customizing the part of UI for each client.

The developed IoT application allowed for managing a chain of devices, including surveillance cameras (change the angles, zoom in/out), lighting, media systems, smart locks, and more via an Android-based mobile app. This led to essential energy and budget economy. The product is now being enhanced by integrating more smart devices into the system. A similar solution may be implemented in any smart home, hotel, or yacht to introduce automation and analysis to the existing infrastructure.

E.g.: Equipment maintenance and service mobile app with augmented reality

The idea was to develop a mobile app compatible with numerous platforms, which would give a possibility to maintain complex industrial equipment single-handedly.

Challenge:

A necessity to ensure image recognition with absolute accuracy.

Solution:

To create a repair or service guide, a user takes a photo of the equipment as a first step. Then the image is processed by Metaio SDK, which is a basis for its further recognition by the app. The built-in image recognition helps to save on painstaking programming and therefore additional investments on the part of the user.

Afterward, each of the required equipment part scenes is supplied with a step-by-step guide by means of animated, drag-and-drop 3D objects, such as a nut, a screwdriver, etc. The system allows to include text information, as well as images and videos in the instructions. Finally, the app’s user gets the complete instructions by simply pointing the device’s camera at the equipment that needs repair. A similar solution may be applicable to any industrial enterprise, healthcare organization, or any other vertical which requires urgent fixes and updates.

The bottom line

Any AR and IoT application development challenges may be addressed with a well-thought-out plan for development, implementation, and further maintenance and enhancement. The quantity of IoT and AR applications is skyrocketing and the above examples are a living proof of the system’s effectiveness in different business spheres.

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