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What if a modern office could live on its own? What if it became an ecosystem that could function clearly, without any extra controls, providing all that is needed to support work activities? Sounds too perfect, doesn’t it? However, here we are going to consider the office of the future and focus attention on crucial issues that the IoT office is able to solve.

A Few Words about Smart Office Forecast

According to MarketsandMarkets research, smart offices will be a driver of tangible growth. The current smart office market is valued at USD 22.21 bln, with this expected to reach USD 46.11 bln by 2023. This means there will be a strong demand for IoT programmers in this area.

The Internet of Things is gradually immersing all spheres of life. Smart cities, Smart homes, Smart vehicles – it is reaching almost every system in which we need to control components remotely and/or implement their interaction. The Smart office is no exception. While we can currently see a bold border between these various just-emerging technologies, in the future the border is likely to disappear and several related smart areas will merge in a whole global IoT concept combining all existing similar systems – smart cars, smart homes, smart buildings, smart offices, smart infrastructure, smart cities... In other words, when speaking about the direction of IoT in one area, we touch on other areas because all of these mutually link to each other. The result is a common impact. A Smart lock is adopted by Smart buildings in Smart cities. A Smart car merges with a Smart home at the technological level.

Having said and recognized this, what however will the Smart office look like?

The smart corporate reality already exists, and advanced tech-savvy owners have endorsed the idea of intelligent digital workplaces responsive to the needs of the staff. Currently though the technology is still driven by human capabilities and market demand – it may take up to 20 years for the Smart office to have evolved and deployed enough to be a common illustration of the ideal future work space.

The Internet of Me, or IoT in HR

A human in the context of the system – a player in the context of the team. The Smart office concept can be considered in terms of it being an item in a community involved in a closed system that is designed to provide what is needed for efficient work. We can start treating the IoT system through ‘The Internet of Me’ approach.

Popular HR editor Steve Boese has discussed his vision of HR innovations. In his opinion, the Internet of Me takes the IoT concept a step further by integrating increasingly personalized products and services into corporate culture. Thus, in the same manner that a group of people begins from a single person, such a personalized approach will find the best way to create an efficient management system. If we keep track of following issues that Smart office technology resolves, we’ll see that each issue is a problem for every employee, and we therefore see that the main mission of the IoT office is to help the employee to do their work smoothly, to easily incorporate separate employees into a solid team, and to take control of and facilitate working and personal needs in the office.

What challenges will Smart office solve?

Speaking generally, IoT allows us to automate all office activities, including parts of the workflow to deliver more efficient work results and the work environment to form the conditions and the highly-equipped workspace where an employee has all they need at hand. Any network system consisting of some items integrated as with each other or directly with processing equipment can be considered as a future IoT system. So, we need to manage this network of objects to:

  • reduce the time we spend for fulfilling any tasks;
  • evenly spread actions and tasks to avoid over- and underloading;
  • reasonably spend energy resources to reduce financial ones;
  • automate all the things to simplify system management.

IoT office solutions can serve employees as well as employers. In the Smart office context, implementation of IoT technologies can not only speed-up workflows but cover the most topical business issues. Let’s consider them.

1. An intelligent environment to make convenient conditions for work

The Smart environment provides the capabilities of a smart building. For example, the organization of an office can include automation of electric lighting and work equipment, an intelligent security system (biometric and remotely-controlled locks), smart counters to collect statistics on electricity consumption, office microclimate specifications and differences, checking of the water supply, ensuring sufficient household and office supplies, and smart support for staff requests.

When an employee enters the room, sensors identify the visitor via motion sensors or other access controllers and send signals to the lighting system and all equipment inside the room to be switched on. Lighting, computers, conditioners, air-humidifiers all start working at levels pre-set for the employee’s comfort.

On one hand, the Internet of Me works because all the conditions are changed to be favorable for the employee. From the business perspective, the intelligent environment is beneficial for employers because its usage considerably reduces office maintenance and ongoing costs.

Challenges:

  • monitoring humidity, temperature, air quality, illuminance;
  • maintaining comfortable office environment;
  • sensor monitoring and automatic device control;
  • lighting failure analysis and replacement notification;
  • roller blinds control;
  • blocking standby power (reduction of power consumption).

To provide such operations, the room is equipped with sensors that detect the environmental status and devices such as air-cleaners, air-conditioners, humidifiers, lighting wall switchers, and smart plugs, which execute programmed commands according to various scenarios:

  • turn on the office lighting based on information regarding the beginning of working hours and motion detector readings; 
  • gathering the temperature and humidity information in the office;
  • when the temperature is high, air-conditioners are automatically turned on;
  • when humidity is low, humidifiers are automatically turned on;
  • when equipment is turned off, smart plugs are also turned off to block standby power;
  • when the lighting in the office fails, the IoT system sends the administrator information about failure and turns on lighting from an extra generator if this is provided (in the case of a power cut).

2. Smart reception service to automate meeting visitors

The smart reception desk helps to unite in-house office life with some activities from outside. If we recently had a receptionist who met visitors, in case of automated reception service, it could work in the following way – a customer uses the wallpad to call the necessary employee, and the IP camera sends the employee a notification and a recorded image of the person waiting for him.

Challenges:

  • easy calling service and searching for an employee;
  • notification of customer visit to employee’s smartphone;
  • customer identification through the camera image.

3. Smart meeting rooms

This works well in big companies of 200 persons and over. In this case, visiting a colleague can be difficult – finding a mutually convenient time and place, for example. However, the inner smart meeting system organizes all arrangements and discussions to avoid over-loading them when things are busy or under-loading when things are calm.

The smart meeting system can have several connected devices and software to provide all opportunities. Firstly, it is a web or mobile service to enable preparations for the upcoming meetings, and secondly, it is a service for remote control of devices. For example, you can customize your presentation remotely through a projector in advance, and coming to the smart meeting room, you can control the whole demonstration through your smartphone.

We should also mention that using AR and VR technologies at the junction of the IoT office can massively expand the opportunities for remote meetings – especially when thinking about very long distances.

Challenges:

  • automated convenient booking system for meeting rooms;
  • email request to attend a meeting;
  • push notifications of meeting attendance; 
  • distribution an email of meeting minute;
  • auto mode function (presentation start, complete);
  • broadcasting to employees’ smartphones and possibility to join the meeting online.

4. Smart security zone

Security inside the office can also be smart. It’s not just the outside wall that needs to be secure for many offices. The system is outfitted with door sensors, IP cameras, motion sensors, smart alarm integrators and others, providing fully-automated control of every action in the office during the day, when staff are working inside, and at night, when all people have left the office. We can treat security in general, but overall it means more ways of control, enabling control over employees’ actions to avoid information leakage and intervention against insiders. A separate direction is the use of smart locks, smart cameras, smart tracking software, etc.

Challenges:

  • intrusion detection and notification;
  • real-time camera images;
  • video recording;
  • smart locks status and remote control.

5. Smart space management service

Speaking about smart office opportunities, we shouldn’t forget about the personal necessities for employees. One example concerns the automation of restrooms and kitchens. The employee can use connected devices when – for example – going to get a coffee and relax in the lounge zone: the system will tell him before he goes there how many people are there and whether the zone has free spaces for him.

Challenges:

  • occupancy checking using Smartphone;
  • real-time update of occupancy information.

To sum up the smart office opportunity, we see that there are many corporate scenarios where IoT can make a difference to the enabling of business activities, rather than spending resources on redundant actions. This is the main idea of IoT development as a whole: the technology helps to make a system efficient, reducing all expenditure and increasing its potential.

Photo Credit: Tayloright

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Amid today’s digital era, many travel companies are still living in the “analog” world of developing relationships with customers. The “mass production-mass market” mindset that emerged out of industrial revolution has unfortunately survived through the advent and maturity of the World Wide Web.

Mass market mentality combined with lack of a data strategy heavily emphasizes products and services, putting the customer last. Most companies don’t go beyond mass communication with consumers, which results in one-way conversations.

Today’s customer is well-informed, leveraging social media to learn more about the product, seek recommendations/opinions, and provide product feedback. If companies have not leveraged data or digital capabilities to re-imagine the purchase path and inspire customers to buy their product or service, they are well behind the curve. PepsiCo is one company that has been successful in rethinking the role of the customer in a brand. LAY’S s “Do us a Flavor” campaign resulted in customers creating and voting for new flavors.

We are seeing a changing mindset in the travel and transportation industry. Uber and Airbnb are disrupting business models through customer-centric design, shared economy, and simplicity. To improve based on customer feedback, Airbnb's CEO used Twitter to ask users for product feedback.

Thanks to IoT, digital cloud technologies, and the declining cost of storage, data is collected from everywhere – internal systems, transactional systems, external (social media) sources, and devices.

However, in many cases we are seeing that data is not leveraged for better customization:

  • Data is not consolidated and lives in silos.
  • Only “structured” data is looked at.

Customers are to provide more personalization – offering the right product at the right time in the right situation. Customers expect the level of personalization provided by Netflix and Amazon in almost every only interaction, regardless of whether the company is in the retail, entertainment, or travel industry. When they experience features, such as a recommendation engine, they get to what they need faster and company revenues increase in turn.

If you notice one thing that’s common between an Uber, Airbnb, or Amazon for that matter, it is the platform. Platforms are becoming the core of the digital economy, and they enable enterprises to provide curated personalized experiences for their customers.

Every large enterprise is building a platform (Enterprise API) to encapsulate core business logic that can be served to upstream channels like mobile, websites, call center, and kiosks. These APIs get opened for external business consumption to build new business models and partnerships. Using Data Lake technology, these enterprises are able to build a data management platform that can aggregate, build, and enrich customer/consumer data. By applying big data technologies, machine learning, and advanced analytics, enterprises can build a 360-degree view of the customer.

This results in a customer-centric strategy. Customers expect to be put first and are demanding from travel companies. If they perceive that their airline or hotel chain of choice is behind the curve in personalization, they just might take their loyalty elsewhere. The cost of acquiring a new customer is at least four times more than keeping an existing customer. This, combined with the increase in revenue from up-selling and cross-selling that personalization provides, should put technology initiatives that increase personalization at the top of the list for any travel company.

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IoT Minute Episode 62: The Collaborative Edge

When retail machines talk to each other directly or collaborate through edge gateways, customers are more likely to find what they're looking for. Why lose a sale due to a lack of inventory when a customer can be redirected to a nearby location where their product preferences can be met.

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2018 Analyst IIoT Predictions

Each year we like to go inside FreeWave and ask our team what the Industrial IoT forecast looks like for the upcoming year. Throughout 2017 we were hard at work developing some of our industry-leading Edge intelligence and industrial Wi-Fi products, so this year, instead of looking inward, we decided to take a peek around the world at 2018 IIoT predictions from some of the leading experts.

Network World

Based off a Forrester report, three immediate trends spring to the forefront: specialization, security, and Edge infrastructure. Taking a bird’s eye view, as the market proliferates, many Industrial IoT providers will no longer need to be a one-size-fits-all solution, instead being able to double down on proprietary technology that has a highly specific and specialized purpose. Edge Infrastructure, already one of the hottest sectors of IoT, will possibly determine the future of big data and predictive analytics, in turn driving machine learning and beyond. And then, of course, there is the security element.

As the domains of Operational Technology (OT) and Information Technology (IT) converge, the traditionally more vulnerable standards and practices of OT will take on more of an IT flavor, incorporating more hardened cybersecurity elements as IT managers (with security ALWAYS on their minds) take on more prominent roles in industrial operations and implement the next generation of IoT-ready devices and systems.

IDC

In early November, IDC put together a list of 10 predictions for IIoT covering myriad facets of the industry, including:

  • As much as a 25 percent increase in security spending
  • 10 percent growth in IoT sensors on Blockchain distributed ledgers
  • In three years more than $1 trillion of enterprise IoT project investments will be built on net new technology spending

These are interesting predictions and fall in line with the general trend of the industry over the last five years. But there was one prediction that caught our eye:

  • “By 2020, IT spend on Edge Infrastructure will reach up to 18 percent of the total spend on IoT Infrastructure, driven by deployments of converged IT/OT systems that reduce the time to value of data collected from their connected devices.”

Essentially, IDC is predicting that in two years Edge intelligence will use nearly 20 percent of the industry’s total IoT spend. This Edge intelligence will be driven by IT/OT convergence that enables faster data transmission via Fog Computing, enabling predictive analytics and real-time data monitoring. This is a significant note, as many companies are focused almost exclusively on figuring out how to transmit data from the Edge in usable packets.

Maciej Kranz, vice president of strategic innovation at Cisco

Kranz wrote the book on IoT (literally, check it out: Building the Internet of Things), and he tends to view it from more of a business standpoint. However, as more companies attempt to jump into the IoT fray, taking a strong – and long – business perspective could be the difference between success and failure.

In his ten predictions, Kranz finds similar footing with many analysts and thought leaders (paraphrasing):

  • IoT will become the key security domain as organizations ‘finally begin to take IoT security seriously.’
  • IoT will revolutionize data analytics as technology shifts to dynamic or real-time analytics and streaming data using AI and machine learning
  • The focus of IoT will move from driving efficiency to creating new business value as companies use IoT to create new value propositions: in manufacturing mass customization, and more mass personalization.

To us, however, the most interesting prediction offered up by Kranz has to do with standardization:

  • “We will see an industry-wide, accelerated move to open standards, open architectures and interoperability.”

At FreeWave, we have been huge proponents of opening up architectures to make the creation of IIoT software applications easier and more accessible to critical industries. Currently, many IIoT software needs require sophisticated and complex development chops. But, with the rise of NODE Red – and with the growth of language agnostic hardware – development and interoperability opportunities are opening up for everyone.

2018 could be a watershed year for the Industrial IoT. We highlighted three analyst and thought leader predictions here, but many carried the same tenor: security, analytics and proliferation will drive the growth of the industry over the next few years.

We’d love to hear from the community as well: what predictions do you have for IIoT in 2018?

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(Dashboards can be viewed here.)

Insurance companies that find a partner, which analyzes, understands, and helps them to take advantage of IoT-based technologies, can reduce costs, paving the way for lower premiums and increased customer loyalty.

Many types of insurers record an unnecessary number of claims. By adding IoT sensors, real-time data can be attained and custom alerting can be configured to prevent claims from occurring. In addition, robust predictive models on historical sensor data can predict claims based on geography, even by a customer.

Let’s look at a situation where a company contracts out a service provider to monitor and maintain the health of four cold storage warehouses in South Florida. Each warehouse has many refrigerated rooms storing food, and each room is equipped with three sensors: one temperature, one humidity, and one open/closed sensor for the entry door.

By employing an app to use WebSockets, monitoring can be performed through dashboards, where individual data elements are refreshed without requiring any user interaction. Think of this view as a live status screen in the service provider’s operations center.

The system includes dashboards to monitor, alert, and proactively prevent claims. The warehouses and cold storage rooms dashboard provides a status summary for each room including how recently the sensors last updated. Room sensor data shows the graphical views of current and historical sensor data. Dials show some predefined thresholds for green, orange, and red alerts along with the current value. Then, line graphs show trends over the past few minutes, hours, and days.

IoT sensors catch anomalies and prevent claims before they happen. Because the refrigerated units are storing food, there are multiple scenarios that might result in a food spoilage claim. One might be if the temperature in the room crosses the threshold into orange alert and remains there for more than two hours. Another might be if the temperature ever crosses the threshold into red.

Alert notifications can be configured so that the policyholder gets notified via push notification, SMS and/or email when the temperature crosses the threshold into orange. Perhaps the door was left open, which can likely be resolved. However, if the temperature remains orange for more than 15 minutes, a message or work order is pushed to the service provider queue, which dispatches someone to investigate and proactively resolve the issue.

In addition, the system includes dashboards that insurance companies can leverage to generate business value. These predictive scenario dashboards slice the sensor data in various ways.

The manufacturer performance screen helps insurance companies determine the most effective sensor manufacturer, saving time and money from defective sensors. Another dashboard helps identify events and incidents, such as anomalies between the two sensors.

Another screen shows customer segmentation by sensor data. This helps insurance companies enable premium discounts based on lower claim probability. The historical loss ratio and claims analysis dashboard provides loss ratio by location and number of claims by location.

Additionally, claim prediction insights are provided. Using historical data, predictive models are created to predict the number of claims, total amount of those predicted claims, and number of claims avoided.

By incorporating IoT sensors into a telematics solution, policyholders can catch anomalies and proactively prevent claims. Insurance companies can leverage predictive scenario dashboards and predictive models to avoid claims, reduce costs, lower premiums, and therefore increase customer loyalty.

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In the same way Uber matches the drivers of cars with people who need a ride, smart connected products can be matched with people looking for those products. Mashing-up products, proximity, preferences and people can lead to sales.

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By capturing real time inventory data from vending machines, smart shelves and other instrumented sources of retail data, you learn customer preferences which let you quickly manipulate product mix to increase sales.

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Have We Already Bored of Predicting IoT?

If you have read my post “Will finally be 2017, the year of Internet of Things? I do not think so.” you will have confirmed there were some analysts and companies who guessed and others who did not hit the bullseye.

As usual, numerous predictions about the Internet of Things (IoT) appear at the end of the year, some with foundation, others by interests and others by opportunism. Although I notice a certain fatigue this year perhaps due to the appearance of other cooler technologies or very likely to the lack of success and few differences from previous predictions. 

It may also be the last time I write an IoT prediction article.

Let's start by reviewing some of the 2017 predictions.

Successes and failures of IoT 2017 predictions

Sorry Morgan Stanley but 2017 has not been The Year Of Internet Of Things however is true that there is less hype around IoT.

Yes Forrester, we continue worried that there will be a large-scale IoT security breach.

As not many large IoT projects in 2017, the role of System Integrators has not been as important as IDC predicted.

Have you seen, Analysys Mason, key developments in LPWA technologies, connected cars and smart cities?

Who now, MachNation if Internet of Things platform revenue grow 116% in 2017. There are only financial numbers but we all agree with Sandhill that still many doubts how “Choose your platform.

It is true Forbes “The Internet of Things (IoT) is still a popular buzzword, but adoption will continue to be slow.” 

I have to say that Judith Hurwitz and Associates, were right that the growth will be in industrial sector rather than the consumer sector.

Hard to fail if you consider what Moor Insights & Strategy predicted: IoT is still in its infancy in terms of dollars and deployments, and that can’t last much longer, before market frustration sets in

Brave, ADLINK and FreeWave Technologies, Inc predicted that Edge computing will become a mainstream term for IIoT. 

Internet of Things Institute - “Recruiting Will Remain a Challenge for Organizations with IoT Initiatives” and sorry Teradata not many companies looking for Internet of Things architect role.

Tier-1 operators in the US and Europe happy with Northstream because IoT revenues contributing up to 3% of total revenue in 2017. 

Telefonica IoT and Cisco Jasper trusted that LPWA expansion to harness the growing IoT.

What will be of IoT in 2018?

According with Ericsson, in 2018, mobile phones are expected to be surpassed in numbers by IoT devices.

It seems that 2018 will be the year when AI and IoT will converge. But it will also be the year in which the CIOs will be busy integrating device management into overall IT infrastructure in a way that doesn’t overwhelm the organization. This is where the adoption of application robots, natural language processing (NLP) and AI automation of processes will come into their own, offering intelligent management of IoT deployments cheaply and efficiently. 

However, 2018 will not be the year of Blockchain and the IoT, because although Blockchain-based IoT adoption rises to 5%, Blockchain is not yet ready for large scale deployments requiring reliability, stability and seamless integration with existing technology infrastructure. But promising pilot projects are beginning to emerge and the maturation of IoT and blockchain technologies and products will drive blockchain adoption in 2018.

To reinforce the ongoing investment across the industry Gartner’s Strategic Trends for 2018 back up the focus on IoT with Intelligent Things, Digital Twins and Cloud to the Edge all making the list for the coming year. 

On the other hand, Forrester affirms that finally 2018 will be the year in which the Internet of Things moves from "experimentation to business scale". Forrester also predicts that IoT platform offerings will begin to specialize in “design” and “operate” scenarios.

Punctual to his annual appointment, IDC makes its Worldwide IoT 2018 Predictions. 

One more year, Citrix leading thinkers also share their predictions.

A small  startup, Imagimob considers 6 trends in the IoT and Industrial IoT-IIOT in 2018. As you can imagine Low Power Area Networks (LPWAN), Edge computing, AI on the edge and Blockchain are included.

IoT Security repeat predictions in 2018. Forrester in the same line predict More cyber threats and design specialization.

Fog Computing, Security, and Smarter Decisions are IoT Predictions for 2018 by Saar Yoskovitz, CEO of Augury, a preventive maintenance company.

The State of IoT In 2018 for Marketers: We’re going to experience a massive increase in the number of digitally connected devices, changing the game for marketers across the globe.

IoT 2018 – the next stage: the IoT of integration, value and action

IoT Will Move From Experimentation To Business Scale - 

5 IoT trends that will define 2018 - In 2018, IoT-based ventures will have greater access to startup capital and be taken more seriously in the market. 

Only one wish for IoT 2018 from my side

In spite, I am not in this list of 17 Experts Tell The Most Exciting IoT Trends to Watch for in 2018, I have a wish for 2018: 

“I hope that in 2018, all proofs of concept become successful projects and that the most innovative startups resist the temptation to be acquired." 

Thanks, in advance for your Likes and Shares.

 

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The phrase, “the future is here,” is overused and has evolved into a catchphrase for companies struggling to position themselves in times of technological or digital transformations. Still, the sentiment is understood, especially in times like today, where the Internet of Things is quite literally changing the way we think about hardware and software. We’d like to offer an addendum to the phrase: “The future is here more quickly than we thought it would be.”

Digital transformation, increased computing ability, smart hardware and the growth of connectivity capabilities created a perfect storm of accelerated industry, and many were left scrambling to sift through the large amounts of information and solutions available. With that in mind, we wanted to provide some advice for companies across the industrial sector for the best ways to optimize operations for the Industrial IoT.

1) Upgrade your network and throughput capabilities.

Nothing can kill the ROI of automated processes more quickly than the literal inability to function. It’s important to understand that as you upgrade machinery and invest in the software to run it all, those systems demand greater bandwidth in order to effectively utilize the big data and analytics capabilities. Several options exist, but for most companies some combination of industrial-strength broadband (WiFi), narrow-band, cellular and RF communications will create the most effective network for the needs.

2) Invest in smart hardware.

This may seem like a no-brainer, and really, in the not-too-distant future, you may not even have a choice, but the shift toward Fog Computing is gaining momentum and being able to run decentralized computing between hardware and the Cloud can not only create greater operational efficiency, but it can also allow your data transmission to run more smoothly as well. The beauty of a Fog Computing system is that it allows a greater number of devices to transmit smaller data packets, which frees up bandwidth and speeds real-time data analytics. The core of this lies in the smart hardware.

3) Be proactive about application development.

Smart hardware means that it has the ability to host applications designed specifically for your needs. Previously, many companies shied away from app development because it required highly skilled developers and devices capable of hosting those apps – a combination that wasn’t readily available. Today, the scene has changed. With the rise of Node-RED, it is much easier today to create proprietary applications without a computer engineering degree, and any company serious about leveraging IIoT technology needs to be able to to use the full scope of its data.

4) Secure your communications.

There isn’t much more to be said about the importance of cybersecurity. If the last few years of massive data breaches haven’t rung alarm bells, then you aren’t paying attention. Cybersecurity today is a multi-layered need. Most companies building smart hardware are beginning to build encryption directly into the devices. But, since many companies use Cloud applications for computing and analytics, it is important to invest in strong security measures at that level as well. Unfortunately, the sophistication of cyber-attacks are only going to increase, along with the increase in importance of the data needing to be protected. It pays to be paranoid and act accordingly.

Further Reading:

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Embedded systems have become part and parcel of electronic equipment such as mobile phones, routers, modems, washing machines, microwave ovens, remote controls, RFID tags, PDAs, etc. They are low power consumption units that are used to perform some specific function of the device. For example, embedded systems are used in home automation with wired or wireless networking to control or regulate lights, security devices, sensors, audio/visual systems, sense climate change, monitoring etc. They are also used as networked thermostats in HVAC systems i.e. Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems. Furthermore, in the coming years embedded systems will be the mainstay for the deployment of many IoT solutions, especially within Industrial IoT applications. The leading players in embedded systems are engaged in hardware and software development, and are looking forward to bringing these transformations into their products to take advantage of the thriving IoT market.

The chief areas which are going to be transformed are microcontrollers, microprocessors and Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS), followed by networking and memory devices, open source communities and developers. By 2020, humongous growth will be seen in the market for embedded systems. It is predicted that the market will grow with a CAGR of 22.5% to reach $226 billion by then. On the other hand, IoT will bring up a host of challenges for developers of embedded systems, as they need to develop devices which allow flawless and uninterrupted connectivity. To assist them meet the challenges posed by the internet of things, a real-time operating system (RTOS) must be designed that delivers flawless connectivity, scalability, modularity, and safety. 

What does internet of things, IoT mean for an embedded developer?

As the internet of things, IoT solutions are present across several industries, it gives a wonderful opportunity for embedded system developers too. For an embedded developer, it’s not all about linking multiple devices to the internet. There is much more than just connecting devices to the internet. Internet of things (IoT) for embedded systems is more about gathering, monitoring, and analyzing large amounts of disparate data from different sources and summarizing it into useful and actionable information to enhance the way services and devices are being used today.  

Hope you find this post helpful. If you did, share it with your colleagues and friends. For any query related to this post and career in IoT, you can comment down below. 

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The current political events in Barcelona provide us with a barely-needed reminder that we live in changing times.  I was in the city as part of the Trustonic team exhibiting at IoT Solutions World Congress last week and took some time to speak with fellow vendors. I soon saw some fantastic product demonstrations that drew my attention - I wanted to learn more. Frequently though, the response to: “This looks great - how is it secured? How do we know the data is trustworthy?” was a puzzled look and a “It uses our cloud and we secure that” or “It runs on a secure OS”.  Sometimes the response was worse: “It’s a closed network. You couldn’t attack it”.

It didn’t fill me with confidence. Everyone has a secure solution, it seems. But how do we know that it’s secure? Who has validated it? The questions and the perplexed looks continued. I slept uneasily.

I don’t want to criticise the IoT solutions that I saw – they were interesting and point to an exciting future for us all. Unfortunately, securing these solutions isn’t exciting and probably won’t draw a crowd to your stand. It’s rare to see ground-breaking security solutions making the news – consumers just expect it these days. Of course, you can expect a media frenzy if you’re breached. There have been some horrifying examples already and we are still in the early days of this industry. IoT solutions need to be secure by design – or, to put it another way, the components of the solution must already be secure when they are deployed. With the headache (and tedium) of security taken care of, the industry would be free to innovate and dream up even more exciting products.

I was showing an IoT security demo built on a Samsung ARTIK board, which already has Trustonic TEE technology embedded. It showed an IoT device connecting to Amazon Web Services (AWS), cryptographically proving itself to be secure and having a trusted identity, thus enabling it to become automatically registered on the system. Perhaps not as exciting as an IoT boat or sports bike sharing data in real time, but it demonstrated that, by embedding a truly secure OS (one that’s Common Criteria certified and FIPS-140-2 approved) combined with a Root of Trust installed in the factory (think of this like a digital birthmark), an IoT device can be trusted pretty much automatically. Once you have an inherently trusted device, you can be confident that data from its sensors is also trustworthy.

Shakespeare wrote “Love all, trust a few”. So, love all the cool and exciting IoT products – but only trust the few which are truly secure.

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A recent study by Cisco suggests that 75% of IoT initiatives will fail. However, there is growing pressure to invest in IoT. Ensuring the success of enterprise IoT initiatives is definitely not easy given technology immaturity, culture obstacles as well as well as the challenges of traditional organizational structure. So put the odds of success back into your favor using a customer-centric, integrated team (IT) philosophy.
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IoT Use Case - Battery Powered Device

Battery-powered devices are comfortable to use but have also some major issues. Especially during the development, some important aspects must be taken into consideration, unfortunately it is not just replacing the power plug. In the first episode of my new series, "IoT Use Case", I want to focus on the topic of "battery-powered devices" and give you some of my main take aways from the experience I was able to gain in real projects.
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The manufacturing industry is undergoing many changes. Those specializing in traditional manufacturing are finding it difficult to keep up with the changes. Perhaps the biggest change has been how traditional manufacturing has come under pressure to manage vast amounts of data captured from different sources. Here are some of the reasons the Internet of Things (IoT) can help.

1. KEEPING AN EYE ON SUPPLIERS

Quality control has become easier because IoT helps keep an eye on suppliers. This makes for easier manufacturing processes. Keeping an eye on suppliers is all about looking at all the constituents that the supplier offers. Capturing data about these constituents through IoT helps make for faster data processing and better quality control.

2. MORE PRODUCTIVITY

Thanks to IoT, many manufacturers are now building self-correcting systems. Missing parts are replaced and parts are replenished, giving rise to greater productivity. Since manufacturing industries are looking in particular for ways to boost productivity, there is no way for them to overlook what IoT can do for them. In addition to greater productivity, there is also more convenience since the need for human labor reduces.

3. MAINTAINING SUPPLY LINES

The Internet of Things is expected to help manufacturers stick to lean manufacturing while at the same time helping maintain supply lines. Since lean manufacturing often requires smart management of the supply lines – to ensure that components are never in short supply but there is no overstock – IoT is expected to help resolve many problems. It will help ensure that suppliers located in different regions can be kept in the loop and supply lines can be managed smoothly so that there is no shortage. It will also help reduce waste and optimize the use of resources.

4. UNINTERRUPTED MANUFACTURING PROCESS

Usually, manufacturing is divided into many processes, from sourcing of raw materials to production, transportation and reaching the customer. However, with the Internet of Things, experts envision something extra. The entire process will be smooth and effective. The raw materials will be already marked for production, intended to reach a particular buyer. This is how experts see things play out as IoT advances to new levels.

5. REDUCED COST

As IoT gains more efficiency, manufacturers can expect to see lowered costs. This is one of the primary reasons manufacturing experts are enthusiastic about the role of IoT. It will become easier to track information about products and processes and more automation would help bring about greater efficiency, thus eventually reducing costs. Lowered costs are expected to boost profit margins. If your manufacturing plant has not invested in IoT yet, this might be the right time to start.

6. LAUNCH NEW PRODUCTS

With IoT, studying needs and launching new products becomes easier. There is less jostle and inefficiency than traditional systems. Manufacturing is thus one of the key areas where you can expect a lot of improvement, thanks to the Internet of Things.

7. INTEGRATING OFFLINE AND ONLINE PROCESSES

Traditionally data and manufacturing have been treated as separate entities. However, in manufacturing industries where IoT advances, this is expected to change. As products begin to carry information about them, it becomes easier to assign a processing and logistics path to them. This is why it becomes critical to involve IoT in your manufacturing plant.

8. CONNECTED TO THE CONSUMER

Products are, in the end, manufactured to suit the consumer. Thanks to IoT, it becomes easier to stay connected to the consumer and create products that match their requirements. This offers two-way benefits, as the consumer gets the best products and the manufacturing plant is able to manufacture products per exact specification. There are a lot of benefits that manufacturers can expect in the long term, thanks to the Internet of Things.As manufacturing processes undergo change, it becomes imperative for manufacturers to make the most of the coming revolution. Supply chains and logistics will become smoother thanks to the industrial Internet of Things. According to many experts, we are at the cusp of another major revolution that will change not only how things are manufactured but also the market economy. It is a good idea to be prepared for these changes by investing in the right IoT system.

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